Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Looking for a new 3TB HD

Question

Posted

Hey guys, anyone have tips on how to pick the most reliable HD? Like brand, model and etc. I'm going to be using it for music, pics and movies. I did however found this one on ebay and the feedback appears to be good with this seller but I never bought from that brand before. Any advice would be helpful.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3TB-SATA3-Seagate-Barracuda-Hard-Drive-3-5-7200RPM-ST3000DM001-BIN-QTY-/200914043269?pt=US_Internal_Hard_Disk_Drives&hash=item2ec7690185

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

41 answers to this question

  • 0

Posted

People just don't take care of their drives. With those insane capacities (or rather: densities; there's never enough capacity) drives are destined to fail much faster than they used to as it is, but taking good care (no vibrations, no shocks, sufficient airflow, sufficiently cool airflow at that - anything over 50*C harms the drive - and no useless shutdowns and spin-ups to "save power") is of an utmost importance and will greatly shift towards plain luck (or the lack of it, thereof) for any manufacturer or brand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='freak180' timestamp='1366225868' post='595643340']
What do you mean by that? The figure higher storage HD's are more safer or am I wrong?
[/quote]
The higher density of a 3TB to a 1TB say plus the different number of internal disks (for one HDD) to get that storage with the density the data is then stored for the HDD to read/write too makes things more to less safe. Even if you take all that into account you are still trusting that one HDD for your data meaning any amount of storage on any HDD is never safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='PeterUK' timestamp='1366227470' post='595643380']
The higher density of a 3TB to a 1TB say plus the different number of internal disks (for one HDD) to get that storage with the density the data is then stored for the HDD to read/write too makes things more to less safe. Even if you take all that into account you are still trusting that one HDD for your data meaning any amount of storage on any HDD is never safe.
[/quote]

True, I always try to save everything amongst 3 sources. My PC Storage, My NAS, as well as on my external drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='freak180' timestamp='1366224703' post='595643282']
lol guys...Still need some recommended drives to purchase :rofl: Some links would be nice as well lol
[/quote]

I'd just say go with the WD Green drives. They work well and they are cheap. I have like 4 of them and they serve me well.

[quote name='Mindovermaster' timestamp='1366231125' post='595643546']
True, I always try to save everything amongst 3 sources. My PC Storage, My NAS, as well as on my external drive.
[/quote]

You should also consider an off-site back up. If your PC/NAS/Ext.HDDs are all in one place (e.g. your house or apartment) and a fire happens or you're robbed you'd lose everything in one hit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

B&H had a deal the other on the WD 3TB Red drive which put the price right in line with the Green and Seagates line.($135). If you can find a deal like that...it is pretty much a no brainer (longer warranty .. 3 yrs vs. 2 of the greens and Seagates).

Really, it doesn't matter which brand of 3TB you buy for the purpose you are wanting them for. I have a mix of WD (Red/Green and a Black in the desktop) and Seagates. Future expansion in my HTPC and NAS will be Reds (they run cooler and longer warranty)....but I've never had a hard drive fail on me (aside from a WD Scorpio notebook drive).

....it doesn't matter. Just pick a 3TB that falls within in your price and warranty range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='compl3x' timestamp='1366282677' post='595644538']
You should also consider an off-site back up. If your PC/NAS/Ext.HDDs are all in one place (e.g. your house or apartment) and a fire happens or you're robbed you'd lose everything in one hit.
[/quote]
What, you mean save it on the cloud?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='Mindovermaster' timestamp='1366297132' post='595644840']
What, you mean save it on the cloud?
[/quote]

That is one possibility. I think sites like Carbonite and Crash Plan have unlimited plans that are pretty cheap. ((Crash plan, 1 computer, 1 yr, unlimited, $69.30 AUD)) - If you have a lot of stuff to back-up, it might take awhile at first but after that it is just a matter of letting the software sync the new stuff with the cloud.

Or put an Ext. HDD with your most important things at another location. (E.g. parents house, siblings house, safe deposit box etc.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

I have that disk, I don't like it at all.
Been using WD Black series from a long time an are amazing, didn't like the green series though, actually I hate it as I hate that Seagate disk.

I know WD Black series are more expensive but you don't want those scary sounds that make my seagate drive. If you go to newegg you will see a very highly rate of failure of those disk.

I'm saving for a NAS and some WD red series disks.

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='Mindovermaster' timestamp='1366209209' post='595642680']Seagate is not to blame. I had many WD drives die on me. It's a fact of life. Every drive will die, just a matter of time.[/quote]

Sure, every drive dies, but what I'm saying is that I've had unusually high failure rates with Seagate. The only reason I've ever gotten rid of any WD drive is because it was getting too old and too small stay useful--not because it started developing defects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

Still, stop using it because it is too full is not a good practice. In that sense, you could get rid of your old seagate drives as well, because they're too old and have too much stuff on them...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

Both Seagate & WD have had their ups and downs.
It is known that some of their models have a higher failure rate than others. You can't just lump everything from one brand in one heap.

I try not to buy anything released too recently, without other people trying them out first :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

Most of the stuff I buy are the cheaper WD's, that have been out for awhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

Most reliable mechanical HDD from major brands in my opinion and experience.. get the Western Digital RE 3TB [url="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236354"]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236354[/url]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

[quote name='Mindovermaster' timestamp='1367009974' post='595659992']
Still, stop using it because it is too full is not a good practice.
[/quote]

I'm going to assume this is in reply to what I wrote, seeing as it immediately followed my post.

In that case--this is twisting my words. I wasn't suggesting anyone get rid of a drive that's getting "too full". I wrote:

> getting too old and too small to stay useful

...which has completely different implications than being "too full".

I wouldn't get rid of a 4TB drive that's getting "too full".

I do, however, still have an 8GB hard drive somewhere in a drawer. [I]That[/I]'s the sort of thing I meant by "too small to stay useful". It's not worth putting in a new system, or even offering it for free to someone looking for extra disk space.

Put into this context, your comment doesn't make much sense to me.

Speaking of which, I really need to find someone who'll take that drive (and another other small pile) for recycling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

nevermind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Posted

Regardless of brand, you should always consider your hard drive as something likely to fail immediately and catastrophically. The only way you can get some peace of mind regarding your data is to make backups on other drives located somewhere else, i.e. external drives that you leave unplugged when you're not using them, or cloud storage.

That said, as pure storage drives, I'm partial to WD Greens. They have excellent noise and vibration characteristics and are among the most affordable. It's probably what I'll end up getting for my next computer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.