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HTC found to be using Nokia’s proprietary microphones in HTC One

nokia htc lawsuit lumia htc one

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#31 adrynalyne

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 21:31

Never mind the fact that HTC had to put all that increased CPU, GPU and RAM in there to try to match the performance of the lumia, and the Lumie 610 with WP7.0 still outperforms it.


Your comparison is irrelevant unless they both run the same OS. The One running WP7.0 would smoke the Lumia 610.


#32 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 21:35

Your comparison is irrelevant unless they both run the same OS. IThe One running WP7.0 would smoke the Lumia 610.

I got lost, the lumia 610 is equivalent to the HTC one?

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#33 adrynalyne

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 21:36

I got lost, the lumia 610 is equivalent to the HTC one?

Posted Image



I dunno, ask HawkMan. I built off his example.

#34 siah1214

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 21:43

Exactly.. but god forbid Microsoft/Nokia apologists to actually read the point.



Right.. it's super easy.. engineering piece of equipment around new processors, heat requirements and many other things is super easy.. jesus


http://redwing.hutma...rtfuldodger.htm

#35 thealexweb

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 21:51

HTC never made the best phones. well during the WinMo era they sort of did, mostly by being the only major OEM. but their phones never had good build quality or industrial design as for as quality went. their cameras have universally sucked their screens have been mediocre at best...


The HD2 was a frankly awesome phone for when it was released.

#36 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:08

HTC is pratically boasting about it: http://blog.htc.com/...free-recording/

Nokia said the technology in question is "high amplitude audio capture" and enables high-quality recording of music from mobile phones. Nokia said it took apart the HTC One to confirm the microphone, which HTC called "dual membrane HDR", was the same as its own.


Reading the article apparently STE was unauthorised to sell the microphone to HTC, as it was developed by Nokia. It would seem HTC believed STE was authorised to sell the microphones, hence why the promotional material openly advertised the technology - there was no deceit. The recent trend of using injunctions to prevent the sale of infringing products is particularly concerning, as it has a much greater economic impact than simply requiring a company to pay the appropriate licencing fee for the patented technology. It is being used to stifle the competition rather than to protect innovation, which is what patents were designed for.

#37 Fahim S.

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:15

Reading the article apparently STE was unauthorised to sell the microphone to HTC, as it was developed by Nokia. It would seem HTC believed STE was authorised to sell the microphones, hence why the promotional material openly advertised the technology - there was no deceit. The recent trend of using injunctions to prevent the sale of infringing products is particularly concerning, as it has a much greater economic impact than simply requiring a company to pay the appropriate licencing fee for the patented technology. It is being used to stifle the competition rather than to protect innovation, which is what patents were designed for.


I don't understand - who said Nokia are even interested in licensing the tech? Hence an injunction seems entirely appropriate here. Or am I missing something?

#38 vcfan

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:24

It is being used to stifle the competition rather than to protect innovation, which is what patents were designed for.


wait what? How do you "protect innovation" if in doing so, its labeled as "stifling competition"? I think some of you sure are drinking that google koolaid. What the hell is the point of a patent then?

#39 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:45

wait what? How do you "protect innovation" if in doing so, its labeled as "stifling competition"? I think some of you sure are drinking that google koolaid. What the hell is the point of a patent then?

I don't understand - who said Nokia are even interested in licensing the tech? Hence an injunction seems entirely appropriate here. Or am I missing something?


The issue is whether HTC acted in good faith in its decision to include the microphone in the HTC One. If that's the case and STE is to blame then it is a disproportionate response to prevent HTC from shipping the phone, as that would create a significant delay and the cost to replace the microphones used would be considerable. The more appropriate remedy would be for Nokia to sue STE for the breach of contract and the economic damage it caused (or to simply licence the technology to HTC). This would only apply to the phones already manufactured, as any future phones would use a non-offending part.

As I said, patents are designed to protect innovation. If STE is at fault then it should be the company held to account. HTC shouldn't have to incur a substantial cost and significant delay for something it wasn't responsible for, as that would vastly exceed the harm to Nokia. It's about proportionality. Nokia has every right to protect its intellectual property but it shouldn't be able to abuse the system to disproportionately disadvantage one of its major competitors. However, if HTC knowingly designed a phone that infringed on Nokia's patents then the injunction is completely justified.

#40 Boz

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:52

I don't understand - who said Nokia are even interested in licensing the tech? Hence an injunction seems entirely appropriate here. Or am I missing something?


Injuction is not warranted because HTC didn't infringe on anything... they bought it from STE.. Nokia can sue STE and ask for money they lost because of them selling it..

Nokia is actively trying to prevent HTC because HTC makes better phones and sells more phones than Nokia's pathetic attempts in selling that Windows Phone failure. They are sad.. When you can't compete try everything you can to prevent competitors.

#41 zeke009

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 22:57

Injuction is not warranted because HTC didn't infringe on anything... they bought it from STE.. Nokia can sue STE and ask for money they lost because of them selling it..

Nokia is actively trying to prevent HTC because HTC makes better phones and sells more phones than Nokia's pathetic attempts in selling that Windows Phone failure. They are sad.. When you can't compete try everything you can to prevent competitors.

That's a lot of ridiculousness in one post. No company should be allowed to sell a product that contains components that they do not have a license for. Insert any name in place of Nokia here because any company in their situation would do the exact same thing.

HTC and Nokia could very well team up to beat STE senseless here for their major part in the whole thing, but that doesn't change the fact that HTC has a product on the market with proprietary Nokia components they are not licensed to use. Expect a licensing deal so they can shift their focus to beating STE.

#42 +fusi0n

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 23:00

Naughty Naughty..

#43 -Razorfold

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 23:00

Nokia is actively trying to prevent HTC because HTC makes better phones and sells more phones than Nokia's pathetic attempts in selling that Windows Phone failure. They are sad.. When you can't compete try everything you can to prevent competitors.

Actively trying to prevent HTC? They asked for an injunction to stop the supply of microphones to HTC NOT to stop HTC selling the One.

So essentially what Nokia did was correct, and as usual you're just full of ****. I'm sure if someone stole your work and then claimed it as their own you'll be totally happy with it and not do anything about it.

And as for can't compete? LOL. Sorry HTC hasn't been able to compete in the Android marketplace for quite a while now, Samsung has completely destroyed them.

#44 pickypg

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 23:02

Well, if HTC has no knowledge of what STM did, then HTC should sue STM.

I believe that Nokia is within its rights to sue HTC over this infraction, just as I could sue another company for accidentally stealing the code that I write through a middleman. None of this is to say that you disagree.

Additionally, I think that Nokia should also sue STM for breach of contract, and HTC should sue STM for losses as a result of STM's breach of contract. Of course that assumes that HTC had no knowledge that the chip was Nokia's.

#45 Athernar

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 23:02

Injuction is not warranted because HTC didn't infringe on anything... they bought it from STE.. Nokia can sue STE and ask for money they lost because of them selling it..

Nokia is actively trying to prevent HTC because HTC makes better phones and sells more phones than Nokia's pathetic attempts in selling that Windows Phone failure. They are sad.. When you can't compete try everything you can to prevent competitors.


This is clearly all part of a Google-funded plan to extinguish all competition, and create an Android monopoly.

The infringement was wilful and should be fined.



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