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Ubuntu 13.04 'Raring Ringtail' released

ubuntu 13.04 raring ringtail

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#46 Original Poster

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 21:13

boot speed has never been a linux forte.


really? i dont get why people say this lol my ubuntu loads fast as hell! (intel pentium and 6gbs ram) it had booted into login before I could even open the disc tray to put in a boot CD... then loging in only takes a few seconds


#47 ViperAFK

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 00:27

Yeah, distros that use systemd or upstart can boot quite fast. Boot speed for modern distros has been excellent for me.

#48 +Karl L.

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 00:36

Yeah, distros that use systemd or upstart can boot quite fast. Boot speed for modern distros has been excellent for me.


The experimental Debian packages for Systemd (in Sid) delivered a significant boot speed improvement on my test system. However, Debian Wheezy still boots faster using SysVInit than Ubuntu 12.04 does using Upstart on the same system. I know that Upstart is supposed to be an improvement over SysVInit, but in retrospect I don't think it actually succeeded. It's certainly usable, but it also doesn't seem to deliver the purported boot speed improvements like Systemd does.

#49 ViperAFK

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 00:45

The experimental Debian packages for Systemd (in Sid) delivered a significant boot speed improvement on my test system. However, Debian Wheezy still boots faster using SysVInit than Ubuntu 12.04 does using Upstart on the same system. I know that Upstart is supposed to be an improvement over SysVInit, but in retrospect I don't think it actually succeeded. It's certainly usable, but it also doesn't seem to deliver the purported boot speed improvements like Systemd does.


Thats probably more to do with debian being lighter-weight than ubuntu than sysvinit vs upstart. Ubuntu starts a lot more services and such, whereas debian has a more minimalistic approach.

I would agree that systemd improves boot speeds better than upstart though, its got a more modern design and better parallelization (socket based vs event based). But I'd also say upstart > sysvinit too.

#50 +Karl L.

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 01:00

Thats probably more to do with debian being lighter-weight than ubuntu than sysvinit vs upstart. Ubuntu starts a lot more services and such, whereas debian has a more minimalistic approach.


I kinda suspected that. I haven't tried removing services or building out a minimal install because I have no interest in running Ubuntu full time; I just like to keep up with its development and try new releases because it is very popular and closely related to the distro I contribute to most heavily.

I would agree that systemd improves boot speeds better than upstart though, its got a more modern design and better parallelization (socket based vs event based). But I'd also say upstart > sysvinit too.


That's interesting. Why would you say that? All throughout the SysVInit vs. Systemd debate in Debian and elsewhere I have not heard anyone offer an argument (not to mention a convincing argument) that Upstart is superior to Systemd. The best justification of Upstart I have heard yet is that it preceded Systemd, so Upstart is justified being in a less advanced state. Even then I have not heard an argument for its adoption outside of Ubuntu, although some argue that it is acceptable for Ubuntu to stick with it by virtue of the fact that it is already in place and migration would be an unnecessary hassle.

#51 ViperAFK

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 01:01

I kinda suspected that. I haven't tried removing services or building out a minimal install because I have no interest in running Ubuntu full time; I just like to keep up with its development and try new releases because it is very popular and closely related to the distro I contribute most heavily to.



That's interesting. Why would you say that? All throughout the SysVInit vs. Systemd debate in Debian and elsewhere I have not heard anyone offer an argument (not to mention a convincing argument) that Upstart is superior to Systemd. The best justification of Upstart I have heard yet is that it preceded Systemd, so Upstart is justified being in a less advanced state. Even then I have not heard an argument for its adoption outside of Ubuntu, although some argue that it is acceptable for Ubuntu to stick with it by virtue of the fact that it is already in place and migration would be an unnecessary hassle.


I think you misunderstood my post (I may have worded it poorly). I didn't say upstart is superior to systemd, I said systemd is indeed better than upstart, but that I do think both of them are much better than sysvinit.

#52 +Karl L.

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 01:03

I didn't say upstart is superior to systemd, I said systemd is indeed better than upstart, but that I do think both of them are much better than sysvinit.


Oops. I misread your post. I thought I was going to get an interesting explanation that I've never heard before. It turns out that I actually agree with your point.

#53 Kreuger

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 12:18

Ive had nothing but problems since upgrading.

#54 Growled

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:33

Ive had nothing but problems since upgrading.


What kind of problems?

#55 Kreuger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:15

What kind of problems?

Well when I rebooted after updating, I was greeted with the lxde login manager. Put in my credentials and got nothing. It won't boot to the GUI no matter what desktop I pick. So finally, I hit ctrl+alt+f2 for a terminal and ran startlxde but it gives me an error about connecting to the display. So I ran startx instead and it required me to install gnome. So now Im stuck running gnome-shell (which I can't stand) because nothing else will work. And this is the only way I can get it to login, too. Now I run lxpanel after booting so that I can have some sort of comfort of normalcy, and the menu has no icons.

#56 ViperAFK

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:16

Well when I rebooted after updating, I was greeted with the lxde login manager. Put in my credentials and got nothing. It won't boot to the GUI no matter what desktop I pick. So finally, I hit ctrl+alt+f2 for a terminal and ran startlxde but it gives me an error about connecting to the display. So I ran startx instead and it required me to install gnome. So now Im stuck running gnome-shell (which I can't stand) because nothing else will work. And this is the only way I can get it to login, too. Now I run lxpanel after booting so that I can have some sort of comfort of normalcy, and the menu has no icons.


Sounds like your upgrade is b0rked, I'd try a clean install...

#57 68k

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:27

Good, although it tuns like crap on my daughters PC


Give Lubuntu a go (or, install LXDE and log into that). GNOME and KDE are pretty resource intensive.

boot speed has never been a linux forte.


I once had my Linux boot time down to 10 seconds (but I wasn't using GNOME or KDE)...


Many people have forgot that Linux is all about customization - it gives you so many more options than other OSs. You probably couldn't tell what distro I am using if I were to post a screenshot.

#58 HawkMan

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:54

Many people have forgot that Linux is all about customization - it gives you so many more options than other OSs. You probably couldn't tell what distro I am using if I were to post a screenshot.


Geeks tend to forget that most people don't want to spend hours and days "customizing" their computers or phones, they just want them to work. heck It's starting to annoy me as well when I can't just install and get going.

#59 Kreuger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 15:39

Sounds like your upgrade is b0rked, I'd try a clean install...

I was hoping to avoid that so I dont lose 200gb+ of torrents.

#60 n_K

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 16:27

I was hoping to avoid that so I dont lose 200gb+ of torrents.

Why would you lose all your data?
Remove all folders but /home/ and /root/ (assuming you only store stuff there) and then do a normal install without formatted = no lost data.