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USB Flash Drive Dilemma


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#16 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 02:42

After almost 5 hours...

Checking for bad blocks in non-destructive read-write mode
From block 0 to 30523391
Checking for bad blocks (non-destructive read-write test)
Testing with random pattern: done												
Pass completed, 0 bad blocks found. (0/0/0 errors)

So, it works, but....


#17 cybertimber2008

cybertimber2008

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 02:54

You really want to use something like dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/dev bs=512k
I've found that having a block size really shows the speed better.

#18 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 03:07

It looks like there is nothing wrong with your flash drive. The speeds are not particularly great, but they are in line with other modern flash drives. Unfortunately there is nothing you can do about it. Running an OS off of any USB 2.0 device is going to be rather slow, regardless of the memory read/write speed.

If you want to get a good flash drive with fast read/write speeds, I highly recommend the Patriot Supersonic Boost XT. It is a USB 3.0 flash drive with a durable casing and much faster flash memory than most other flash drives. If you plug it in to a USB 2.0 port it will get no better speeds than the Patriot Xporter Boost XT, which is still faster than most generic USB 2.0 flash drives because of its better flash memory. I have owned 5 Patriot Xporter Boost XT's of various sizes and they have all been very fast and reliable. I have 1 Patriot Supersonic Boost XT which is very fast when plugged into a USB 3.0 port. I would only consider running an operating system off of a good USB 3.0 flash drive (plugged into a USB 3.0 port). USB 2.0 drives are just too slow.

Patriot Supersonic Boost XT 8GB
Patriot Supersonic Boost XT 16GB
Patriot Supersonic Boost XT 32GB
Patriot Supersonic Boost XT 64GB

You really want to use something like dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/dev bs=512k
I've found that having a block size really shows the speed better.


The point was not to write the data as fast as possible, it was to test the drive for possible defects.

#19 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 03:38

Yeah, I'll look into those. I'll just use my 8GB one for the now.

Now, don't really want to open a new thread, but I remember in Gnome 3.6, that under File, it had a "connect to server" option. How can I do this in 3.8? Been looking over google for awhile.

#20 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 03:49

I haven't used GNOME 3.8 (or 3.6 for that matter), but I think that you should be able to connect to a server using the location bar. For example, press CTRL+L then type 'smb://your_server_name_or_ip/your_share_name' to map a SAMBA share. The familiar "Connect to Server" dialog will pop up to prompt you for credentials or any other details it needs. That method will work for all protocols Nautilus supports, including SSH, FTP, and WebDAV.