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Use Intel HD 4K & Radeon HD 7970


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#16 +Karl L.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 18:52

So if I'm understanding this right, you can use two GPUs at once in Windows, and have been able to since at least Vista, but there is no communication between the GPUs so windows cannot be seamlessly dragged between the two. I stand corrected.


#17 articuno1au

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 18:57

Windows can be seamlessly dragged between.. Kind of.

There's a flicker as memory is transferred from one GPU to the other, but other than that it's seamless >.<

If you drag something like a Windowed game, it might take a second or so to move, but other than that it should be fine :o

#18 limok

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 18:59

With my set up I've set my discrete card as the primary output and the HD4000 as a secondary (set peg in BIOS). When playing games the discrete card is use and when watching movies Intel's Quick Sync is use without me changing any settings. Intel Quick Sync encoding works as well.

#19 threetonesun

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:00

Windows can be seamlessly dragged between.. Kind of.

There's a flicker as memory is transferred from one GPU to the other, but other than that it's seamless >.<

If you drag something like a Windowed game, it might take a second or so to move, but other than that it should be fine :o


Alright, someone get a video of a game running windowed at some monster settings in one monitor, then transfer it over to the HD4000 monitor so we can find out what happens. :laugh:

#20 articuno1au

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:01

I'd do it, but I don't have a chip with integrated graphics :p

Still got my 1366 i7 :p

#21 xendrome

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:03

You have use one GPU to drive one display and another for another display. The GPU's themselves cannot communicate with each other so you won't get some performance improvement out of it if you were expecting that. But if your using more than 2 monitors (or even 3 since AMD have the Eyeinifity setup) then you can use another graphics card to enable more monitors to be connected.


Is it at all possible to use both the GPU for one display and the HD 4K for another display?



#22 Andre S.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:21

So if I'm understanding this right, you can use two GPUs at once in Windows, and have been able to since at least Vista, but there is no communication between the GPUs so windows cannot be seamlessly dragged between the two. I stand corrected.

Yes they can. Sometimes there's a slight hiccup when the windows starts crossing over, but my secondary card is the cheapest quadro in existence so I'm not sure if that's actually Windows' fault.

At least on the desktop, driving each monitor on a separate GPU is exactly the same experience as putting them all on one.

#23 Andre S.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 19:26

The GPU's themselves cannot communicate with each other

Of course they can. There's a cost to that, but two video cards can very well exchange data. D3D and such APIs provide everything needed for that.

What they won't do is automatically split d3d workloads between them as in SLI/XFire; I suppose that's what the quote meant. SLI/XFire is basically a way for multiple video cards to act like a single logical d3d device and internally split the work issued through that device. So if you wanted to use two video cards without SLI you'd simply create two d3d devices, and there are APIs for sharing resources between devices.

Running separate gpus means each monitor uses its own independent graphics resources. This means, for instance, that you could run a different gpu-accelerated movie or video game on each monitor, and each could (optimally) use its own video card.

#24 +Karl L.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 20:07

Is it difficult to setup multiple GPUs? How does it work?

#25 HellboundIRL

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 20:46

Alright, someone get a video of a game running windowed at some monster settings in one monitor, then transfer it over to the HD4000 monitor so we can find out what happens. :laugh:



I just tried this with Battlefield 3. I'm surprised at how well it performed on the monitor hooked up to the motherboard (p8z68v-pro with sandybridge 2700k), still got a decent frame rate of 30 (15fps loss) and there was no flicker when dragging the window from my other monitors powered by a 6870. I was able drag the Battlefield window out to use all monitors but it was too laggy to play at that point, it worked though.

#26 Andre S.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 20:47

Is it difficult to setup multiple GPUs? How does it work?

You plug them in your PC and you start it. Windows does the rest. :)

#27 Andre S.

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 20:56

I just tried this with Battlefield 3. I'm surprised at how well it performed on the monitor hooked up to the motherboard (p8z68v-pro with sandybridge 2700k), still got a decent frame rate of 30 (15fps loss) and there was no flicker when dragging the window from my other monitors powered by a 6870.

What Battlefield 3 probably does is to keep running on the GPU it was spawned on, and let D3D deal with getting the image on the correct monitor. If it's on a different GPU then that means copying each frame over to that GPU. If it's stretched across multiple monitors each on its own GPU, then that means copying the part of the frame that has to be rendered on each monitor to its respective GPU. As you've seen there's quite a lot of overhead to doing that. :)