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#16 +jamesyfx

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 21:42

What, are you mounting them in your roof or something.


No, but just knowing that tilting too far can damage the tv is enough for me to want to avoid them completely. :p It's an expensive item to accidentally damage!


#17 HawkMan

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 21:45

For a room with controlled light, plasma was pretty much the hands down winner for movies... some of them also have significantly better response times then LED/LCD for gaming, but personally I've never found that to be an issue for anything but fighting games. As other have said, the downside for gaming on a plasma is burn-in... in my own experience (Panasonic), ghosting can happen even after a short period of time (especially when the set is first turned on), but generally goes away quickly so long as you don't have static content for long periods of time.


Plasma TV's do have a Burn int/run in time(unfortunate crash of terms). generally the manual suggest that for the first not sure what it ids on new tv's, but it used to be 50 hours you shouldn't have much static images on the screen. after that however they are much harder to get image retention on.

No, but just knowing that tilting too far can damage the tv is enough for me to want to avoid them completely. :p It's an expensive item to accidentally damage!


It's not entirely true though. the rule is generally there for long transport hauls. and the reason is due to how the TV's are packed. generally they're supported on the sides and Plasma's tend to be heavier. This means that if they're laid flat during long transport hauls. the middle of the TV will start to sag under the weight, slightly deforming the TV and potentially damaging it. Same rule applies to large and heavier LCD's to now that 50+ is so common.

Never seen anything about tilting limits on Plasma's though, and I know they have been mounted at 90 degree angle in roofs without issues before.

#18 shozilla

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 21:50

I have a 50" plasma TV... I usually watch movies/shows and play Xbox games... No burn-in images on my screen.

Plasma TVs use lot of watts... charge you lot on your bill... depends on how much TV you use.

LCD/LED TVs use less watts.... not a problem.

Like others say... do not play still images on your screen too long... otherwise you get burn-in images...

Good luck with TV purchase.

I've had Samsung, LG, Panasonic and Sony HDTV's, and through personal experience, I feel that Sony are the best all-rounder when it comes to features, interface speed, audio and picture quality. Although if you're connecting to external audio equipment then I would probably buy a Panasonic.

I would personally not buy a Plasma because of the restrictions on tilting the tv vertically, but that's a personal preference.. A lot of people will never tilt their tv's that far. :p


I have no problems with that... I have swivel/tilt-mount on my wall for my TV.

#19 Lamp0

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 22:29

I have a 40" Samsung LED & it's great!!

The only thing that bothers me about it is a subtle flicker on the screen from the backlight (I don't know what the technical term is).

It's really obvious when the backlight is set low. But it can still be visible when it's all the way up. It depends whats on the screen. It can be really prominent when using menus in games for example.

I generally get around it by using the LED Motion Plus. It removes the flicker, But it also dims the screen. I don't really notice any other difference with it.

#20 HawkMan

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 22:43

Plasma TVs use lot of watts... charge you lot on your bill... depends on how much TV you use.

LCD/LED TVs use less watts.... not a problem.


The reality is that the power usage isn't that different. a large plasma will use between 180-220 Watts, a large LCD will use around 120-140. the difference is about a single old lightbulb and won't really affect your power bill much. your heater and AC has a much bigger effect in a single day than this has the whole year.

#21 OP The Teej

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 08:13

Many thanks for all of your advice guys, I've definitely learned some extra stuff here! I have decided to go with this model:

http://www.hughesdir...50st50b/product

I've seen it in store and it looks absolutely amazing. Once again, thanks for all of your advice!

#22 HawkMan

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:22

You should be very happy with that.

#23 +virtorio

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:33

That's a fantastic TV.

#24 68k

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:48

What makes me most upset about modern TVs is their rubbish sound.

My old (30" or whatever it was) Sony Trinitron CRT TV had true hi-fi sound. I used to listen to CDs on it because it sounded so good. Today, even on a high-end LCD, you get average sound. You're expected to spend and extra $300 to $1,000 on a sound bar/hi-fi system.

Once again, manufactures are focusing on form instead of function.

I know what you mean - it's so damn hard to find a "good" TV these days.

#25 HawkMan

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:57

What makes me most upset about modern TVs is their rubbish sound.

My old (30" or whatever it was) Sony Trinitron CRT TV had true hi-fi sound. I used to listen to CDs on it because it sounded so good. Today, even on a high-end LCD, you get average sound. You're expected to spend and extra $300 to $1,000 on a sound bar/hi-fi system.

Once again, manufactures are focusing on form instead of function.

I know what you mean - it's so damn hard to find a "good" TV these days.


HiFi Sound, not so much, but older TV's did have better sound yes(the only TV's that could claim HiFi sound was B&O). however you're not going to get good speakers in a flat TV, Grundig actually has decent sound on theirs though.
Just get a soundbar or a pair of PC speakers if you need good sound though. that high def flat screen that's far better than your old sony, remember in pure price and especially if you calculate inflation in there to, costs a fraction of your old Trinitron. so you can afford to buy a decent soundbar with it.

#26 compl3x

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 21:00

What you should be considering next is some surround sound or a sound bar if a proper home theatre isn't possible. That Panasonic plasma is a good TV, but I can guarantee you the speakers will be ****-poor. Generally all TV speakers are of below average quality. I think manufacturers only put them in because consumers wouldn't accept buying a TV without inbuilt speakers.



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