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SpaceX reusable launcher (Grasshopper) thread 2


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#106 PaulRocket

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 15:48

Can we expect the first dev 2 flight in August?


#107 OP DocM

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 17:33

No word yet on when SSA tests begin but the pad is ready. The drop-dead date for F9R tests in Texas ending is Feb. 26 2015, and they so far finish a test series well before the FAA permit runs out.

#108 PaulRocket

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 18:18

Still no info on possible next f9r launch? Those videos always get me excited for days and I can't wait...

#109 OP DocM

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 19:08

Should be soon as recent images shot by a local pilot show them working on it. The grid fins are still there.

His images also show what is being interpreted as the new DragonFly (Dragon V2 landing testbed) launch pad, and for dead certain the Falcon Heavy test stand and it's flame trench under construction.

The DragonFly pad pics are labeled sx_deer_stand1.jpg and sx_deer_stand2.jpg

Gallery link....

#110 PaulRocket

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 20:11



Landing of the Orbcomm mission f9 1st stage.

#111 OP DocM

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 20:48

YESSssss ....

FALCON 9 ROCKET FIRST STAGE

Following last week's successful launch of six ORBCOMM satellites, the Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage reentered Earth’s atmosphere and soft landed in the Atlantic Ocean. This test confirms that the Falcon 9 booster is able consistently to reenter from space at hypersonic velocity, restart main engines twice, deploy landing legs and touch down at near zero velocity.

After landing, the vehicle tipped sideways as planned to its final water safing state in a nearly horizontal position. The water impact caused loss of hull integrity, but we received all the necessary data to achieve a successful landing on a future flight. Going forward, we are taking steps to minimize the build up of ice and spots on the camera housing in order to gather improved video on future launches.

At this point, we are highly confident of being able to land successfully on a floating launch pad or back at the launch site and refly the rocket with no required refurbishment. However, our next couple launches are for very high velocity geostationary satellite missions, which don’t allow enough residual propellant for landing. In the longer term, missions like that will fly on Falcon Heavy, but until then Falcon 9 will need to fly in expendable mode.

We will attempt our next water landing on flight 13 [CRS-4] of Falcon 9, but with a low probability of success. Flights 14 and 15 will attempt to land on a solid surface with an improved probability of success.





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