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Mysterious Poop Foam Causes Explosions

iowa gastronomy methane hydrogen sulfide flammable

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#1 Hum

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 17:24

When you hear about foam in the context of food, you might think of molecular gastronomy, the culinary innovations of the Spanish chef Ferran Adrià, who's famous for dishes like apple caviar with banana foam.

But this post is about a much less appetizing kind of foam. You see, starting in about 2009, in the pits that capture manure under factory-scale hog farms, a gray, bubbly substance began appearing at the surface of the fecal soup. The problem is menacing: As manure breaks down, it emits toxic gases like hydrogen sulfide and flammable ones like methane, and trapping these noxious fumes under a layer of foam can lead to sudden, disastrous releases and even explosions. According to a 2012 report from the University of Minnesota, by September 2011, the foam had "caused about a half-dozen explosions in the upper Midwest…one explosion destroyed a barn on a farm in northern Iowa, killing 1,500 pigs and severely burning the worker involved."

And the foam grows to a thickness of up to four feet—check out these images, from a University of Minnesota document published by the Iowa Pork Producers, showing a vile-looking substance seeping up from between the slats that form the floor of a hog barn. Those slats are designed to allow hog waste to drop down into the below-ground pits; it is alarming to see it bubbling back up in the form of a substance the consistency of beaten egg whites.

Jacobson said that surveys show that around 25 percent of operations in the hog-intensive regions of Minnesota, Illinois, and Iowa are experiencing foam—and "the number may be higher, because some operators might not know that they have it."

He added that the practice of feeding hogs distillers grains, the mush leftover from the corn ethanol process, might be one of the triggers. Distillers grains entered hog rations in a major way around the same time that the foam started emerging, and manure from hogs fed distillers grains contains heightened levels of undigested fiber and volatile fatty acids—both of which are emerging as preconditions of foam formation, he said. But he added that distillers grains aren't likely the sole cause, because on some operations, the foam will emerge in some buildings but not others, even when all the hogs are getting the same feed mix.

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#2 Growled

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 18:10

Isn't there any way to dissolve the foam?

#3 LaP

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 18:16

Isn't there any way to dissolve the foam?


Fire ?

#4 Growled

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 18:20

Fire ?


:D

I was thinking of something a little less violent.

#5 The Laughing Man

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 18:24

Why is this all of a sudden a recent issue?, Have poop collection methods changed?

#6 vetneufuse

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 20:49

methane issues eh?

#7 episode

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 20:54

Why is this all of a sudden a recent issue?, Have poop collection methods changed?


As it says in the article, they changed what they are feeding them.



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