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#1 Deep_Level_Shark

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:58

I'm trying to write an english sentence better way. Here is the sentence:

He died at his residence on 10-Feb-2011 naturally.

Is this a correct english ?

what I tried to mean is that the person had a natural death on that date.how do I write a better english here ? can you please correct it ? what are other possibilities here in wrting ?

Need help.


#2 Marshall

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:04

He died in 2011, on the 10th of February of natural causes.

#3 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:06

He passed away 10th February 2011, I believe it was natural causes.

#4 Jabneh

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:11

He passed away on the 10th of February, in 2011, of natural causes.

#5 OP Deep_Level_Shark

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:25

Here is so far I have written this paragraph...I am not sure if this can be written in a better way.


I have known Mr.X at address Flat-2,City-Y,Dist-Z,Pin-K for the last 6 yrs with good physical & mental health to my knowledge. He passed away on the 10th of February, in 2011, of natural causes.


Can I write at address ? Is it correct ?

I am not sure....can you please correct it

#6 Gerowen

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:31

It doesn't look too bad. You could just change the word "naturally" to "of natural causes", so that it reads, "He died at his residence on 10-Feb-2011 of natural causes.". Using just the word "naturally" I don't believe is technically improper, but the term used most commonly nowadays when referring to a natural death is "of natural causes".

#7 OP Deep_Level_Shark

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:43

Please look at post #5

Do you see any scope of improvement of wrting the paragraph in better way ?

also ...at address is correct ? or I need to write it some other way ?

#8 +Xinok

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:43

This is how I would write it, though it may be different depending on your location as well as your reason for the writing (letter, article, essay):

He passed away from natural causes at his residence on February 10, 2011.

For professional or formal writing, avoid abbreviations such as Feb or yrs. I'd say there's technically nothing wrong with the way you wrote it; it's merely a matter of convention which is something you learn with time.


I have known Mr. X, whom resided at the address Flat-2, City-Y, Dist-Z, Pin-K, for for the last six years and has always appeared in good physical and mental health.

You should always have a space after punctuation, including in "Mr. X" and the comma-separated list. As well, the bit, "to my knowledge," is implied from the context so I feel it's unnecessary.

Edited by Xinok, 19 May 2013 - 05:50.


#9 OP Deep_Level_Shark

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:57

This is how I would write it, though it may be different depending on your location as well as your reason for the writing (letter, article, essay):

He passed away from natural causes at his residence on February 10, 2011.

For professional or formal writing, avoid abbreviations such as Feb or yrs. I'd say there's technically nothing wrong with the way you wrote it; it's merely a matter of convention which is something you learn with time.


I have known Mr. X, whom resided at the address Flat-2, City-Y, Dist-Z, Pin-K, for for the last six years and has always appeared in good physical and mental health.

You should always have a space after punctuation, including in "Mr. X" and the comma-separated list. As well, the bit, "to my knowledge," is implied from the context so I feel it's unnecessary.


Thanks Mr Xinok,

I guess you had a typo here ..

I have known Mr. X, whom resided at ....

should have been ....
I have known Mr. X, who resided at ....

is not it ?

Can you please confirm ?

#10 +Medfordite

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 06:58

Out of curiosity, why state the address? This is not relevant unless you are writing a legal report or other documentation which requires such data.

This might help with your who vs whom question:

http://www.prdaily.c...en_to_8964.aspx

#11 jakem1

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:50

He passed away 10th February 2011, I believe it was natural causes.


:rolleyes: This is a pathetic euphemism, not correct English.

#12 Nick H.

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:02

Thanks Mr Xinok,

I guess you had a typo here ..

Nope, "whom" would be correct I believe. I can never get it right, myself, but here is the rule

#13 Barney T.

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:18

:rolleyes: This is a pathetic euphemism, not correct English.


It is accepted and is correct English, except it is better to say that he died.

#14 jakem1

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:19

Nope, "whom" would be correct I believe. I can never get it right, myself, but here is the rule


Who is correct, not whom. Who relates to he/she and whom relates to them. If you were to rewrite the sentence accordingly you would say:

have known Mr. X. He resided at ....

Either way, the original sentence is a bit awkward.

#15 Nick H.

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:21

Who is correct, not whom.

Told you I could never get it right. :laugh: