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Xbox One Reverses DRM! Angry Rant

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#16 spacer

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 12:33

That's weird. Maybe it's just been all the hype recently, but I have been led to believe the Xbox One is an entirely new console.

 

I'm not saying disks are obsolete, but there certainly are better delivery methods other than driving to your nearest game store handing over cash to bring home a physical medium containing your new game. There aren't nearly as many Video/DVD rental stores around anymore because movies are now being delivered digitally. Why should gaming consoles be left out of this digital revolution?

 

If something is inevitable, why wait around dragging your feet to implement it. I don't understand how people can't be "ready for it now" but they will be in 2020. People are just scared of change. Those same people should take a look at Darwin's theory of evolution.

 

I for one will never buy a disc based game again provided their is a digital copy available. Why run the risk of the losing the disk, the disk being damaged, or having to rummage through mountains of disks trying to find the one game you want to play when it is there ready to go at the press of a button.

 

Stupid dinosaurs should just die out already and let the rest of us enjoy what technology can provide us.

 

There is a difference between a true digital future where we still have ownership, and the digital future that Microsoft was trying to push with the One. I am totally ready for an all digital future. As long as it means I still own the copy of the software that I buy. I DON'T want a digital future that amounts to a glorified rental business.




#17 BajiRav

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 14:44

I have no idea who this guy is but I couldn't watch the video after I saw that thumbnail.

:p

who the ###### is he anyway and why should I care? :laugh:



#18 +FiB3R

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 14:46

There is a difference between a true digital future where we still have ownership, and the digital future that Microsoft was trying to push with the One. I am totally ready for an all digital future. As long as it means I still own the copy of the software that I buy. I DON'T want a digital future that amounts to a glorified rental business.

 

^ This



#19 slapfacemcdougal

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 14:55

:p

who the **** is he anyway and why should I care? :laugh:

 

 

You don't have to care, but putting your fingers in your ears and saying "Oh he's just someone on youtube, who cares", makes you seem childish.



#20 LaP

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 15:33

I dont understand why people think that when a technology becomes old (Disc), makes it obsolete. 

 

I don't really think people think discs are obsolete.

 

The thing is many XBox and Microsoft fans touted the DRM features as a good thing and something that would "revolutionise Apple style" the industry. Personally i never understood how treating discs as digital downloads was revolutionary and we did not know enough about the family sharing thing to consider it this way either.

 

When Microsoft decided to do a 180 those people had to justifiy what they said before hence this Youtube video.

 

I think everyone agree that one day everything will be digital stored on flash memory. We are heading this way no doubt about it. But right now lack of storage space, download cap and download speed make this scheme not viable. The HD in the One will be what? 500GB. At 20GB per game you can have only 25 games installed. And this is not  counting the space required by OS, music, video, downloadable content and such which means you can realistically install probably something like 20 games at most. While it's enough for me lot of people own more games than that.

 

I think it's better to consider discs as discs and have a market place to let people buy digital if they want to. Yes the restrictions on digital downloads are bad but nothing prevent Microsoft from building an infrastructure to remove some of them. The family thingy could easily apply to digital downloads while not working for offline disc gaming. Microsoft could also build a market to resell and buy digital rights and give a cut to the publishers.

 

We will probably go fully digital one day. Unlike music or movies you don't need to keep your games for ages. But we are not there yet and the scheme designed by Microsoft was confusing and had potential disasters waiting to happen like the 24 hours phome home and the participating retailers.



#21 LaP

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 15:43

They changed their mind after seeing this:

 
;)
 
I think what happened on Jimmy Fallon show had probably more to do with the 180.
 
When Jimmy Fallon said the PS4 was the only console supporting used games (which was no true) people started to applause.
 

Oh, the big story that everyone is talking about is this system <PS4> is the only one where you can still play used games


http://arstechnica.c...ith-used-games/

#22 TheAncientOne

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 15:48

"People were just not  ready for a fully digital console yet, and was the reason for the Xbox One backlash. The Xbox One was like a 2020 console being released in 2013. Making a console fully digital is a nice idea, but it gives the publishers/Microsoft total control over the games which is unsettling."

 

I really don't think it's a matter of people not being ready for a fully digital console--as much as it was people revolting against what they thought were restrictions for things they will pay for.

 

I actually prefer the digital model, because it's very convenient, however, I am against the kind of power it gives to Microsoft and the publishers to dictate how I can use the contents bought.

 

It may not matter if it's 2020 or 2050; people don't like to be told what they can and can't do with what they paid for.  It's a fundamental human belief (legal or not) to feel entitled to what you paid for.



#23 Dutchie64

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 16:29

For everybody who thinks buying software means ownership, should have a good look again.

 

Especially games are still not in the so called "First buy" zone, like books, cars etc.

 

In Europe the court favoured the buyer a while ago, but this is still under debate for all of Europe.

In the US software still is owned by the creator, and you're paying for a license to use it.

 

In that light, reselling a game is very much in a gray area, as are the stores who do this.

 

Is the above fair? I have no idea, but I am used to it after using software for a long time. You're not allowed to resell any software atm, as you cannot resell a license for usage.



#24 Dashel

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 16:57

Love that guy.  ###### and ###### yea.



#25 Trent Devers

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 04:40

For everybody who thinks buying software means ownership, should have a good look again.

 

Especially games are still not in the so called "First buy" zone, like books, cars etc.

 

In Europe the court favoured the buyer a while ago, but this is still under debate for all of Europe.

In the US software still is owned by the creator, and you're paying for a license to use it.

 

In that light, reselling a game is very much in a gray area, as are the stores who do this.

 

Is the above fair? I have no idea, but I am used to it after using software for a long time. You're not allowed to resell any software atm, as you cannot resell a license for usage.

 

I may be biased as a software developer, however I create enterprise software not games. Ultimately as a consumer of software regardless how you obtained the software, you are essentially using a brand new product. Unlike a car, you wouldn't know if the software was purchased second hand, new from a store or as a digital download when you are using it. Sure the box it came in may have crumpled edges, but that doesn't affect the 0's and 1's of the binaries stored on the disk. This applies to all forms of software whether it be MS Office, an operating system, PC or console games. The same can be said for music & videos.

 

In the digital age (opposed to the analogue days where music and video were stored in an analogue format on tapes) there is never any degradation of quality. An audio CD (unless scratched) will sound exactly the same 5 years after you purchased it and a movie on a DVD disc will play like new every time you watch it.

 

A car on the other hand is a physical product that degrades with age. Regular servicing can keep it running top notch, but that dent on your door and worn tyres show right away that it hasn't just rolled off the factory floor. If you sell your car second hand, what you are selling isn't quite what you purchased. As much as I hate the anti-pirating slogan "you wouldn't steal a car"... I kind of have to agree. If you could buy a car, then somehow with out any effort create identical duplicates why would anyone spend time and money creating one in the first place? Wouldn't someone just come along, make a copy of it then sell it cheaper? After all they didn't have to spend any time and money developing it so they have less to recoup with regards to manufacturing costs.

 

Movies, music, games etc. are a different kettle of fish. Someone, somewhere had to sit down for some length of time to come up with a crappy story line and pitch it to a studio for development. The studio then throws mountains of money at Tom Cruise to "act" out a character within the story and a movie is born. All this time and money is stored on a DVD which one person pays $20 for. He then sells it to someone who gets to watch this movie at "second hand" prices. The second hand guy isn't getting a second hand movie. As far as the picture on the screen and quality of sound, it may as well be brand new. Same with music and games. This isn't the same as a buying a second hand car with 100,000kms on the clock. Taking this in to account, there is no such thing as second hand digital media. The end product is no different in quality than a brand new one.



#26 dead.cell

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:08

Love Angry Joe. The 2:18 mark was pretty hilarious, and I love his rant around the 5 minute bit.

 

This whole finger pointing by gamers at other gamers was rather silly, as if we took anything away from them. Never understood that bit...



#27 LaP

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:29

 

 

 This isn't the same as a buying a second hand car with 100,000kms on the clock. Taking this in to account, there is no such thing as second hand digital media. The end product is no different in quality than a brand new one.

 

No it's not.

 

But at the same time why should you still make money out of a work you did 5 years ago ?

 

Normal people don't. The guys who did your house in the past are not paid today for it. They need to build new houses to keep making money. They can't resell the same house over and over again like you can with digital media. Same for the guys who made your car. Same for the guy who cook your bread. If he's not making any more breads tomorrow he's out of luck.

 

Everyone got to work in a day to make money. Why should it be different in the digital world ? Why should i still make money from softwares/music/games i made 5 years ago ?



#28 compl3x

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:13

They changed their mind after seeing this:

 

 

 

Gee. I wonder how that stereotype of gamers being overweight, man-children survives?



#29 dead.cell

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:39

Man... I didn't realize how awful this interview with Major Nelson went. I'm glad Microsoft backpedaled, as his standpoint makes me very uneasy. :/

 



#30 illage3

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:44

There is a difference between a true digital future where we still have ownership, and the digital future that Microsoft was trying to push with the One. I am totally ready for an all digital future. As long as it means I still own the copy of the software that I buy. I DON'T want a digital future that amounts to a glorified rental business.

Agreed 100%  I think the laws should be changed to favour the consumer.