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crazzy88ss

Can't delete random boot.efi file

12 posts in this topic

Some weird file remained in my trash after deleting my Aperture library back up file from an external hard drive.

 

I can't get rid of it.

 

I've tried:

1.) Restarting finder, multiple times.

2.) Rebooting, multiple times.

3.) A basic Sharing & Permissions adjustment (which you can see does not work in the video)

4.) Changing permissions using CHMOD 777 in Terminal.

 

Uhh... any other ideas?

 

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I would love to help on the OSX front, but I can't :(

 

An idea would mount the disk in another OS/boot CD and try that way?

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I don't have another one available.

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No other ideas huh?  I've googled and can't seem to find anybody else w/ this issue.

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Curious if you've tried secure delete. Finder > Secure Empty Trash. 

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What about the Terminal command

sudo rm -rf ~/Desktop/boot.efi

But what puzzles me is how a file only found inside the OS X System folder comes into play with Aperture.

 

Also try looking at this ling on how to unlock files in OS X using Terminal http://superuser.com/questions/40749/command-to-unlock-locked-files-on-os-x

 

Your computer is a Hackintosh? I get some videos on Hackintoshes after viewing your video. If it is then it's mysterious because is it not needed for Chameleon?

Just asking - you can safely ignore this comment about Hackintoshes - I have one stashed away myself so I'm not holy about it :)

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Unlocking the file is a good suggestion. It would also be helpful if you try removing it from Terminal like allan.nyholm suggested; then if it fails you can at least get a specific error message.

 

Troubleshooting this issue should be easier for you with a complete understanding of the OS X permissions system. Unfortunately Apple developed more than one. The first answer to this superuser.com question provides a good overview of permissions in OS X.

 

 

Mac files can be protected in four three different ways that I'm aware of:

  1. Standard Unix ownerships and permissions like r/w/x for user/group/others that you see with ls -l and fix with chown(1) and chmod(1).
  2. File flags like uchg and schg that you see with ls -lO and fix with chflags(1).
  3. The old Finder metadata "Lock bit" that you see with GetFileInfo filename. You can also see the presence of the Finder metadata, but not its meaning, with ls -l@. You can fix it with SetFile(1). Never mind, this is mapped to the uchg flag now.
  4. Access Control Lists (ACLs) that you see with ls -le and fix with the ACL-related arguments to chmod(1).

So let's see what's up with your file by combining all those flags to ls:

ls -lO@e main.m

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Have you tried logging is as root and then attempted deleting it. 

 

Also this guy looks like he solved a similar issue

 

http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=14198556&postcount=4

 

No go.

 

Curious if you've tried secure delete. Finder > Secure Empty Trash. 

 

I couldn't even get it into the trash.

 

What about the Terminal command

sudo rm -rf ~/Desktop/boot.efi

But what puzzles me is how a file only found inside the OS X System folder comes into play with Aperture.

 

Also try looking at this ling on how to unlock files in OS X using Terminal http://superuser.com/questions/40749/command-to-unlock-locked-files-on-os-x

 

Your computer is a Hackintosh? I get some videos on Hackintoshes after viewing your video. If it is then it's mysterious because is it not needed for Chameleon?

Just asking - you can safely ignore this comment about Hackintoshes - I have one stashed away myself so I'm not holy about it :)

 

My sig says "27" iMac".  No hackintosh ;)

 

But the sudo command actually worked!!!  I don't reboot too often, but if it's there next time I boot up, I'll let you know.

 

Since that didn't work, I didn't get to xorangekiller's suggestion.

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Use Onyx, it has an option to clean everything that is in the trash.

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In this instance I would also do a file system check for corruption.

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