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Reviews from Hi-Fi 3D technology Motherboard?


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#1 Aljynx

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 14:18

hello I am new here and i need your personal advice.. I am hearing this Hi-Fi 3D motherboards from "Asrock, Biostar and Gigabyte.". its really attracting how it sounds especially Biostar that they focus on gaming towards high end audio quality and when it comes to system performance they are talking about Asrock..

 

can you please tell me more about this kind of Motherboard? how much is it buying from the market?

 

what is the advantages and disadvantages of this. if this Hi-fi motherboard focuses generally for gaming, then its really perfect from my future needs as now i am starting to play Battlefield and Crysis. =P

 

by the way right now I am only  using Intel® Core™ i5 LGA 1150 Processor.

 

Thanks a lot!




#2 John2walk

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 13:06

the advantage is clearly the good audio feature like smart ear 3d! it gives great sound on any stereo headset! for more details it really depends on your preferences. for your games you should focus more on a good graphics card!



#3 Tony.

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 13:08

I would just get a cheaper motherboard, a better GPU and a dedicated sound card like something from the Xonar series.



#4 John2walk

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 23:29

i would disagree with that. I dont see any use of a discrete soundcard. There is sound on every motherboard these days. Why should you pay extra for that? its just about to finde those having a good quality.



#5 Mindovermaster

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 00:10

I'm guessiong you're not a DJ. There are large differences between normal motherboards and discrete sound cards. 9/10, the cards give better quality. But if you're not into all that jazz, yea, a motherboard sound card will do.

 

Same difference for video cards, why waste $200 on a discrete video card? You have one in your motherboard. Same thing. You want more quality.



#6 Arceles

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 00:20

i would disagree with that. I dont see any use of a discrete soundcard. There is sound on every motherboard these days. Why should you pay extra for that? its just about to finde those having a good quality.

Oh my... the differences are extreme between onboard audio and a dedicated sound card, beginning with the SNR, which is very low on onboard audio AND they are perceptible even on not so much high en devices, of course if you don't care about good quality in audio... well, it doesn't matter.



#7 The_Decryptor

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 00:20

These days there's barely any difference between the sound card on motherboard and standalone sound card, it's not like the old days when the motherboard could basically just run the PC speaker.

#8 OP Aljynx

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 18:18

Thank you for your advice. I understand that audio is generally not too bad anymore, but from what i learned from the last days is that the biostar seems to add some extra features to enhance audio in many cases. For example the Amp to support higher Ohm headphones sounds quite good as many good headphones profit from that.

 

I am just wondering if there is anything else that i need to know? i am planning to set up my system by this coming week. For now, it does not sound like i will do a mistake with my selection :)



#9 HawkMan

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 19:07

These days there's barely any difference between the sound card on motherboard and standalone sound card, it's not like the old days when the motherboard could basically just run the PC speaker.

 

Dunno. onboard sound card still have significant noise induced from all the other motherboard components. still I don't use one right now. 



#10 Mrgel

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 14:49

I also prefer having good audio especially for gaming I have heard this 3D motherboard is from Biostar, if im not mistaken. I dont know if the others has, sounds cool to me... though it sound not cheap.



#11 +Nik L

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 15:02

I dont see any use of a discrete soundcard.

 

As a DJ, you gave me quite the chuckle.

 

As a gamer, I've heard the argument that it offloads the processing?  Not sure what weight this holds.



#12 Innuendo

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 15:13

I'll post my audio solution since it hasn't been mentioned. I'm using the standard Realtek ALC889 chipset on my motherboard, but it's using the S/PDIF-Out optical connection to go to a high-end Denon A/V receiver I bought for a song off of eBay (owner was getting rid of it because it has no HDMI connectors - no big deal for my use) that uses Brown/Burr DACs.

 

Most add-on soundcards can't match the sound quality, but of course, you have to have room in your PC area for the receiver.

 

As for increased noise from onboard sound, it depends on the way your motherboard manufacturer implemented the chipset on your mobo. My Gigabyte motherboard didn't have any discernible noise at all when I was using it with the standard audio connectors before I went to the optical connection. However, I have a friend who had an older Gigabyte board & it sounded awful so I guess it's the luck of the draw.



#13 John2walk

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 11:31

Oh my... the differences are extreme between onboard audio and a dedicated sound card, beginning with the SNR, which is very low on onboard audio AND they are perceptible even on not so much high en devices, of course if you don't care about good quality in audio... well, it doesn't matter.

 

regarding that SNR and quality things i just found a recent review about the HiFi Z87X from Biostar (http://www.overclock...ar-hifi-z87X-3D).

 

 

 

BIOSTAR has chosen to focus a lot on audio with this board, the Hi-Fi Z87X 3D. They covered the Realtek chip to prevent EMI, separated the audio section from the rest of the board, use different and purportedly better hardware in the Hi-V caps to boot.

 

So they take very much care of the separation of audio signals and other elecrical signals, as far as i understand. For most of the people on the plant it should be a great compromise though.



#14 Aergan

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 16:01

I'll post my audio solution since it hasn't been mentioned. I'm using the standard Realtek ALC889 chipset on my motherboard, but it's using the S/PDIF-Out optical connection to go to a high-end Denon A/V receiver I bought for a song off of eBay (owner was getting rid of it because it has no HDMI connectors - no big deal for my use) that uses Brown/Burr DACs.

 

Most add-on soundcards can't match the sound quality, but of course, you have to have room in your PC area for the receiver.

 

As for increased noise from onboard sound, it depends on the way your motherboard manufacturer implemented the chipset on your mobo. My Gigabyte motherboard didn't have any discernible noise at all when I was using it with the standard audio connectors before I went to the optical connection. However, I have a friend who had an older Gigabyte board & it sounded awful so I guess it's the luck of the draw.

 

I have a Yamaha RX-V361, similar situation.

 

For the cost of a dedicated sound card, get a 5.1/7.1 receiver off of eBay.



#15 LaP

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 16:38

i would disagree with that. I dont see any use of a discrete soundcard. There is sound on every motherboard these days. Why should you pay extra for that? its just about to finde those having a good quality.

 

Maybe if you have an expensive sound system and use your PC to listen to lossless audio on it. I don't know about current mb but i swear my Auzentech sound card is giving me better sound quality than onboard sound cards from 3 years ago.

 

Of course for gaming or anything on pc speakers you wont hear any difference.