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Ideas For Windows 8.2


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#46 Andre S.

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 21:49

And what normal user sets out to use these programs?

Well, let's see: the video game industry, the movie industry, the music industry, research facilities, governments, law enforcement, public services, and just generally every office worker working 8 hours a day at a desk. Hey that's billion dollar industries and hundreds of millions of people!




#47 Andre S.

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 21:51

In fact, virtualization might be the only way to run an older desktop program before long - with the desktop and any remaining Win32 bits existing entirely in a virtualized environment, completely isolated from the new Metro environment. 

 

With WinRT being implemented on top of Win32, I don't see how that's even remotely possible.  :huh:



#48 Dot Matrix

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 23:18

With WinRT being implemented on top of Win32, I don't see how that's even remotely possible.  :huh:


Windows used to be built on top of DOS - It's not anymore. ;)



#49 Andre S.

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 23:25

Windows used to be built on top of DOS - It's not anymore. ;)

Except it wasn't.



#50 Atomic Wanderer Chicken

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 23:35

I wish Microsoft can bring aero glass back in 8.2 only for Windows 8 (not RT)

 

win8_tp_0016.jpg



#51 f0rk_b0mb

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 23:40

I wish Microsoft can bring aero glass back in 8.2 only for Windows 8 (not RT)

 

win8_tp_0016.jpg

 

 

Out of all three OS's, Windows, Linux, And Mac OS X, Windows has some really kick ass transparency effects, and the whole idea of being able to switch the colors is awesome. When I first saw Vista, the first thing out of my mouth was "Wow."



#52 trooper11

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 00:01

I'm not sure what the obsession is to bring desktop apps to windows rt/arm.

 

Windows on arm is not meant to be a productivity OS.  Who in their right mind is going to sit down and try to use a windows desktop app on an 8 or 10" tablet?

 

Sure, I can see a very small % of power users that would love to bring their favorite apps along, but this does nothing to improve Win tablets for consumers. What is needed is a better app market on Win 8.  Once enough developers are building quality apps for Win 8, then suddenly a Win RT type of tablet makes a lot of sense to most consumers.  Allowing arm desktop apps will not solve that. Besides, why not allow it to remain a walled garden and keep it more secure then a standard windows environment could be thanks to its more open nature.

 

Reading through this thread, it seems clear that some people simply want MS to go back to Windows 7.  They don't want anything to do with Metro and believe MS should not be trying to cater to other markets beyond the traditional desktop OS.  Well if that happened and MS were to get rid of Metro and just focus on evolving the desktop os from 7 (so lets say just take the desktop side of 8), MS would be fairly steadily walked out of the market thanks to the pc decline.  They become the next IBM and you guys can just all move on to the next cool thing out there.

 

Of course, that might not be a smart move for MS.  If they want to be a devices and services company, then they need a strong consumer presence.  That means they have to address the changing landscape when it comes to what people are using.  There is a shift away from a traditional pc and a move to tablets, smartphones, and ultra portable laptops.  We can moan and groan all we want, but the reality is that the vast majority of pc users are finding that they no longer need to buy a pc to get things done.  That is related to the fact that they simply aren't doing complex things with their pcs.  A desktop environment may always be needed, especially in the enterprise sector, but consumer interests are changing and it doesn't seem to be slowing down.  Despite what some might say, the desktop is not going anywhere and MS has made that clear.  They don't intend to remove the desktop, just to create a transition option for those users that are embracing the touch environments of tablets or smartphones.

 

 

A few notes regarding 8.2:

 

 

So that leads us back to Win 8.  No, I don't think the answer is to remove Metro, but rather keep improving it.  I think that 8.2 should bring with it more customizations so that the user can choose to say disable the metro ui outside of the Start Screen.  8.1 already adds much of that, but I'm sure some would appreciate more control.  They should continue to make tweaks to the desktop, although to me, the desktop is so mature at this point, that is not a whole lot they need to do, just work on bug fixes.

 

8.2 also needs to continue to mix the metro ui with the desktop side in smarter ways, such as allowing for pinned shortcuts to metro apps on the desktop, and possibly some kind of windowed mode for apps. They also need to keep improving the multitasking behavior, as far as how the snap modes work.  I like the changes in 8.1 to allow more control over the size of the snapped view, but they could do more.

 

8.2's biggest goal though should be to improve the Metro UI.  That means they need to going over every aspect of it and looking for ways to improve productivity and bring in more desktop-like features where it makes sense.  Again, 8.1 is doing some of this with the inclusion of a file manager and migrating the rest of the system settings, but they still have much more work to do to make the Metro side a mature environment. 

 

They need to build on the app store improvements in 8.1 to make it as easy as possible for developers to get their software pushed into the market.  They also need to keep improving the apis so that developers can make the most of Metro and not feel limited functionality wise.  MS needs to aggressively court developers of a wide range of content, from productivity apps to games.  The bigger their library, the bigger their user base.

 

Finally, they need to finish the job of bringing Windows Phone, the Xbox 1 and Win RT/8 under one OS roof, meaning a shared app marketplace and a shared design/ code base.  That way, all platforms can feed off of each other, with developers suddenly getting access to a much larger audience without much effort, just making the UI tweaks needed for particular devices.

 

Metro is a 1.0 product, something like iOS 1.0 or Android 1.0.  Even MS is unable to avoid that reality, so that means it will take time for the software to mature.  As long as MS is really focused on improving it, I don't see why it can't mature and become a fine platform going forward. The desktop environment can happily remain in Windows even as Metro matures.  Again, this isn't about MS trying to kill the desktop.  They will keep that around as long as there is demand for it, and there is plenty of demand. 



#53 Dot Matrix

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:52

 

Windows 1.0 - 3.1x were DOS based systems, before Windows 95, 98, and ME freed Windows from its reliance on the DOS sub-system.

 

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Windows_3.1x



#54 OP Pulagatha

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:01

The more I read dotmatrix's posts, the more I think this -> some people liked MS so much and was so desperate for changes to occur, they can't wait to hop onto the W8 bandwagon before even using their head to what's going on. So far the argument of change must occur from the legacy desktop to 'modern' UI is the weakest stance so far. No it doesn't add value, no old code isn't magically taken out, its transformed into something else, and no modern UI cannot accomplish or tackle some of the everyday usages of mobiles, servers or traditional mouse desktops. It was a leap of confidence that wasn't carefully enough thought out, and in the end caused W8 to be received abysmally. Are MS polishing to the Modern UI? yes. Are they doing enough to be proactive? No. Not by a long shot. They still think consumers are idiots, and adding a "start button" will magically make everyone accept the mess that is Modern UI now tacked onto the desktop mode.

 

ideas for windows 8.2

 

1. start maturing quality apps. Get a team dedicated to churning out quality apps, I mean QUALITY apps. Not frames that loads a website in the metro interface, that is 90% of all Metro apps right now in the store. Most are plain ugly, filled with ads, and do not really add much 'value' as some would claim. Why would I for example snap a weather or mail metro app to a 3rd of my screen, if i can simply have a tab open in any browser which does the job better? They haven't thought about that.

2. start pushing more web programming languages for the Metro apps, open it up like firefox and Ubuntu OS are doing.

3. START FIXING BUGS THAT WERE THERE SINCE VISTA. Omg, come on.

 

 

I think they should also think about combining some of these apps. It seems redundant that there is a music app, a movie app, and a games app when it could all be just one. Or a clock app, an alarm app, a calender app, when there could be just one.



#55 OP Pulagatha

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:07

Another thing that Apple doesn't seem willing to do is "Customization." I think this is very much a strong point for Microsoft. One of my favorite things about Windows is the RegEdit file and all the various tweaks I find out about on the internet. Especially, anything that makes the File Explorer more customizable. I wish they would put a little more thought into the auto correct for misspelled words too.



#56 Jollibee

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:19

If there's something that I really want to see if ever there's another update for Windows 8, it's the option toggle the transparency on the Taskbar. The transparent taskbar totally looks out of place compared to the opaque Windows.



#57 Atomic Wanderer Chicken

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:24

I think they should also think about combining some of these apps. It seems redundant that there is a music app, a movie app, and a games app when it could all be just one. Or a clock app, an alarm app, a calender app, when there could be just one.

That's why I think Microsoft should add Windows Media Player to Windows RT as optional for those who'd like to use it. At least Microsoft didn't remove Windows Photo Viewer in RT.



#58 Andre S.

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:15

Windows 1.0 - 3.1x were DOS based systems, before Windows 95, 98, and ME freed Windows from its reliance on the DOS sub-system.

 

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Windows_3.1x

Yes. So I suppose you think that new Windows 8.1 features like booting to desktop, using the desktop wallpaper as start screen background, bringing back the start button, disabling charms on the desktop, and comments like this from Microsoft:

 

"We started talking about the desktop as an app. But in reality, for PC buyers, the desktop is important." source

are all indicative of Microsoft's hidden master plan to deprecate the desktop. Also Windows 8 itself having added support for multi-monitor taskbar, completely redoing the task manager, overhauling file move dialogs and many such desktop improvements are all signs that Microsoft doesn't intend to evolve this technology anymore.

 

We must live in different worlds. In my world, Microsoft is acknowledging customer feedback that a great desktop experience remains essential to its users, and quickly acting upon it. In your world, that must be just them putting up a show.



#59 ians18

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:26

... are all signs that Microsoft doesn't intend to evolve this technology anymore.

 

 

Microsoft isn't dropping the desktop UI (yet) but they are depreciating it. Adding more features (like multiple desktops, proxy icons, new icons, etc)  are all changes needed to be done before  completely dumping the desktop UI.



#60 Andre S.

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:43

Microsoft isn't dropping the desktop UI (yet) but they are depreciating it. Adding more features (like multiple desktops, proxy icons, new icons, etc)  are all changes needed to be done before  completely dumping the desktop UI.


With Microsoft 8.1, my personal feeling is that Microsoft continues to de-emphasize the desktop, but Guggenheimer actually argues the opposite. In his view, Microsoft de-emphasized the desktop a bit too much when it first started talking about Windows 8. “We tried to dial it up again a bit at Build,” he said. Today, 700,000 apps run in the Windows desktop mode and “some of the fidelity of mouse and keyboard will never go away.” Excel spreadsheets, AutoCAD and similar tools still need these old-school input methods, after all.
 
In Guggenheimer’s view, there is “this weird balance between [the desktop] ending up being less critical over time, but it probably never goes away completely. Or if it does, it’s hard to predict when.” 
http://techcrunch.co...of-imagine-cup/