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MAJOR Proton rocket failure (BIG bada boom)


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#1 DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:06



No flight termination charges, Russian launches don't usually use them. They just cut the engines, and here even that's questionable. They may have tried to get it further from the complex First major lower stage failure of Proton since the 80's, though one in '69 was nearly identical to this one.

Something is major broke in the Russian space program :(

http://www.russiansp....com/index.html

Russia's Proton crashes with a trio of navigation satellites

2013 July 2

Russia's Proton rocket crashed less than a minute after its liftoff from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday.

A Proton-M with a Block DM-03 upper stage lifted off as scheduled from Pad No. 24 at Site 81 in Baikonur Cosmodrome on July 2, 2013, at 06:38:22 Moscow Time (on July 1, 10:38 p.m. EDT).

The rocket started veering off course right after leaving the pad, deviating from the vertical path in various directions and then plunged to the ground seconds later nose first. The payload section and the upper stage were sheered off the vehicle moments before it impacted the ground and exploded. The flight lasted no more than 30 seconds.

The Russian space agency's ground processing and launch contractor, TsENKI, was broadcasting the launch live and captured the entire process of the vehicle's disintegration and its crash. Half an hour after the accident, a report on Russian web forums said that a team in the launch control bunker near the launch pad had been in communication with the rest of the space center and apparently had been unharmed. The launch vehicle reportedly crashed near another launch complex for Proton rockets at Site 200.

Since the emergency cutoff of the first stage engines is blocked during the first 42 seconds of the flight to ensure that the rocket clears the launch complex, the vehicle continued flying with its propulsion system firing practically until the impact on the ground.

Around an hour after the accident, a Russian Vesti 24 TV channel reported that Kazakh authorities had considered evacuating population from the area around the crash site due to a possible danger from toxic propellants onboard the rocket. The main residential area of Baikonur Cosmodrome is located 57 kilometers southeast of the Proton launch area.

During the evacuation, some of the personnel at Baikonur took photos of a reddish cloud spanning over the main road to the facility. In Baikonur itself, the city's administration advised residents not to leave their homes, deactivate air conditioners and close tightly all doors and windows due to "a cloud of unburned propellant moving toward towns of Baikonur, Akai and Tyuratam." Fortunately, starting rain apparently helped to dissipate the cloud, Kazakh media reported.
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#2 +zhiVago

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:09

Yeah, the video of the crash is quite epic.

 



#3 Crisp

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:11

Just saw this on the news, pretty bad.



#4 OP DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:18

While the Proton lower stage has had a good record since the 80's this and the other failures may push Congress to get our astronauts off Russian birds ASAP until it gets sorted out. That would require speeding up the US commercial crew program.

Dragon's first crewed flight is set for mid-2015, while Dream Chaser is 2016 and CST-100 soon after. Dragon probably has the best shot at speeding up.

#5 Steven P.

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:26

It's kind of sad we aren't building the ships like you see in Europa Report right now :(



#6 +Anarkii

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:56

After watching that vid I was kinda expecting something a little more devastating than a little explosion - especially after reading the story that brought me here. 
Little badda boom, definitely not a big one.



#7 OP DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 13:57

Are uou joking? That would have taken out several city blocks, not to mention that big brown cloud is HIGHLY toxic hyprrgolic fuel. If done intentionally it would classify as a WMD.

It's kind of sad we aren't building the ships like you see in Europa Report right now :(


Wait til you see SpaceX's MCT architecture.

Officially: MCT = Mars Colony Transport

Amateur video of the Proton failure -



#8 Steven P.

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:00

After watching that vid I was kinda expecting something a little more devastating than a little explosion - especially after reading the story that brought me here. 
Little badda boom, definitely not a big one.

Well the cost was probably astronomical! I noticed the top stage "ejected" with a parachute, hopefully there isn't too much damage to the payload then.



#9 Brandon C.

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:02

You can almost tell right away that the launch doesn't look right.



#10 Steven P.

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:02

Wait til you see SpaceX's MCT architecture.

Officially: MCT = Mars Colony Transport

Amateur video of the Proton failure -

Wow awesome, notice how it took a while for the shock wave to hit? :p



#11 OP DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:12

Well the cost was probably astronomical! I noticed the top stage "ejected" with a parachute, hopefully there isn't too much damage to the payload then.

The cargo fairing just snapped off from the high-G turnover, and even if there were 'chites it was too low for them to open. It's a total loss.

The launcher probably cost $100-150 million, plus another $200m plus for the satellites. Not sure if they are insuring Russian Federal launches like they do commercial ones.

Might be hard to get an affordable rate given the troubles they're having. Normally launch insurance bases out at about $15-$20 million then rises with the cost of the satellite, so it's not a trivial item.

#12 AJerman

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:20

Happy 4th of July!!!!!



#13 OP DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 14:26

It just missed Proton Site 200, so it was a close call as far a losing other pads.

Pravda is reporting a 200 meter crater.

#14 OP DocM

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 15:11

http://rt.com/news/p...eoff-crash-514/

>
There will be no launches from Baikonur for about two-three months, a source in Russia’s space industry told RIA Novosti news agency.

“There will be no launches of Proton-M rockets while the investigation is underway. In two-three days we will know what exactly happened to the rocket. This is a well-known rocket, and the reason for the crash is the human factor and a production failure,” the source said.

“We’ve had similar accidents at Baikonur before. After the area is cleaned up, launches will resume – in two-three months,” the source continued.

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#15 IsItPluggedIn

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 02:41

Doc, the comments on that RT.com site are pretty funny, I got a good laugh out of them. I just looked up the schedule for the ISS, and there was suppose to be supplies going up from Baikonur on the 24th of July. Then new crew on the 25th of September. 

 

Do you know if NASA have a plan since they will not be able to use Baikonur for the next coupe of months.





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