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Need IOS and Android Developers for a project

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#1 M_Lyons10

M_Lyons10

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 21-October 08
  • Location: Pennsylvania

Posted 03 July 2013 - 16:16

Hi everyone.

 

I am working on a mobile application for Windows Phone and wanted to have it ported to IOS and Android.  So, I am asking on here to see if any developers might be interested in the project and what they would be looking for for this work.  I can discuss the app in more detail, but it is essentially an app that will backup specific information to online services (Select pictures, data, etc.).  I would like to support all the major services, such as SkyDrive, Box, etc.

 

I would like someone that has had experience getting apps approved through the IOS and Android stores, as knowledge in doing so would be much needed.

 

Any questions or interest, please feel free to message me or comment here.

 

Thanks Everyone,

-Matt-




#2 SirEvan

SirEvan

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  • Joined: 17-April 03
  • Location: Santa Clara, CA
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: HTC One (AT&T)

Posted 03 July 2013 - 16:22

As a fledgling Android developer, I can tell you that "getting things approved through the app store" for Android apps is cake.  Register as a developer, upload your apk, post icons, banners, text, etc... set a price, and it's up within an hour or two usually.



#3 OP M_Lyons10

M_Lyons10

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 21-October 08
  • Location: Pennsylvania

Posted 03 July 2013 - 16:45

As a fledgling Android developer, I can tell you that "getting things approved through the app store" for Android apps is cake.  Register as a developer, upload your apk, post icons, banners, text, etc... set a price, and it's up within an hour or two usually.

What do you use to develop for Android?  Is targeting all the different Android versions as frustrating as I've heard it is?



#4 SlimShady

SlimShady

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 17:00

I'm interested to hear how you deal with older versions of Android.



#5 firey

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 17:34

I'm interested to hear how you deal with older versions of Android.

 

 

What do you use to develop for Android?  Is targeting all the different Android versions as frustrating as I've heard it is?


I've done a little bit of android development.   I use the android SDK eclipse install.  Comes with everything you need.   Also, when creating a project you specify the minimum API Version.  I opted to go with 2.3.4 minimum, and the app I wrote works fine on my phone (4.1.2).   I have issues with layouts, but they seem wonky as it is (things disappear for no reason, layouts crash for no reason)  but once I refresh the layout in code and recompile all works fine.



#6 SirEvan

SirEvan

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  • Joined: 17-April 03
  • Location: Santa Clara, CA
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: HTC One (AT&T)

Posted 03 July 2013 - 17:39

What do you use to develop for Android?  Is targeting all the different Android versions as frustrating as I've heard it is?

  I use Eclipse, however I've started dabling with Android Studio, it's complex though because the app i'm working on relies on libraries, and to get a project from eclipse into Android Studio (based on IntelliJ) requires the libraries also be imported...which involves a few extra steps.  The next app I work on I'll do in Android Studio though.

 

Targeting different versions isn't too hard.  There are a few things to keep in mind:

 

  1. Most people are on either 2.2-2.3, or 4.x  Unless you wanted to target tablets or SUPER old devices, focus on 4.x and 2.3.  See this graph http://developer.and...ards/index.html
  2. Even though google deprecates some functions in later versions in favor of new versions, they have YET to actually remove it, so if you code for a 2.x feature, even if eclipse/android dev kit tells you "Hey warning! this is deprecated" it will still work.  This of course could always change at a later date, but you should be safe.
  3. Along the lines of #2, say you want to add a newer feature in, that never existed in 2.x.  That's where googles Support library comes in.  Many things, such as fragments, were made into a support library, so if you wanted to use a fragment say on a 2.x device, you can include the support library
  4. The google SDK docs will tell you when a feature was added, so you can see if it will work in old versions.  It's extremely helpful in learning to structure your class/commands.
  5. If you don't want to target a certain device, say you don't want large screens, or you don't want phones below or above a certain SDK level (I don't want to target eclair devices or tablets), you can set this easily in a file called "Android Manifest.xml" and it will never show as available in the market.
  6. If you want the best experience possible, you have to create graphics for different resolutions. This isn't hard, there are some tools that help you do it, but if you don't, android will still scale up or down, which works 85-95% of the time well.  You have the option of also defining different layouts (screens) for different orientations, so you could create a different layout for when a device is horizontal vs. vertical, for example.  Not required, but it's there if you want it.  You can always force the app to only run in portrait or landscape mode for example.

 

That should get you started, feel free to PM if you have any questions.  I've been doing android developement for over a year now, so I've learned a few things.

 

Stack overflow is a great resource if you have questions.