37 posts in this topic

Intel processors don't downclock until it passes the TJunction, 100-105 degrees I believe? If it increases a further 5 degrees the PC is shutdown.

 

Actually it throttles at 1C past Tjunction (honestly not sure of the precision) - you could in theory run your computer right at Tjunction and if your CPU dies it would be warrantied by Intel.

 

Obviously I wouldn't recommend this.

 

As far as the OP is concerned -- if it is "instantly" heating up to 100C that's almost always bad heatsink contact with the assumption that you've applied the correct amount of thermal compound.

 

I would probably also check your vcore but for 90% of the people running Intel CPU's just slapping it into the socket and running it based on default settings is adequate.

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Please people stay on topic and recommend me some CPU coolers.

And the stock cooler is not good for me because some leg mount are damaged/broken and they are not tight enough with the heatsink

Also I live in Greece and we've got hot weather not warm weather..

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Heck afaik the processor shouldn't even go to 100... around 70-80 it should just slow down to a crawl.... unless you're using an AMD cpu?

OT but FYI, AMD implemented automatic clock down at high heat before intel and back int he day intel cpu's could burn out if you removed the cooler while AMD's would just slow down and eventually shut down. 

Well, you might want to do a bit of research because the way I specified is much more effective and it's how I and many others are tought throughout college. The purpose of thermal paste is to transfer the heat from the processor to the heatsink. So, if you are going to apply a dap of paste in the middle and slap the heatsink on then how effective do you think it will be? Not so effective because the second purpose of the paste is to fill in grooves and holes on the entire surface so there is a complete surface contact. The paste does not cover the entire surface if it was applied your way. The heatsink plate needs to have complete contact with the entire surface of the processor. Your way would create uneven contact, especially on the outer area of the processor. Heat will buld up in any areas where the 2 plates don't have a throurogh contact.

 

 

Actually the sole purpose of the paste is to fill in the grooves. though modern paste is so effective it will have very little effect if you have a super thin layer or a slightly thicker layer.

 

the absolutely most effective is however a fully ground down and polished CPU and cooler metal to metal with no paste. But then it needs to be perfectly polished flat. 

Please people stay on topic and recommend me some CPU coolers.

And the stock cooler is not good for me because some leg mount are damaged/broken and they are not tight enough with the heatsink

Also I live in Greece and we've got hot weather not warm weather..

 

I would reccomend one of those fully enclosed water coolers. like the H60/H70/H90. if you want to OC and run heavy computing, get the biggest H90 if you can fit the radiator. 

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My FX-8350 runs at 24 C.  Highest I think it has hit might be 60.  :/

 

So something cannot be right.  I would consider investing in a liquid CPU cooler, they work nicely for me, tho' it might be overkill.  Someone mentioned voltage... that could have something to do with it.  Boot into your bios and look at the voltage levels that are being delivered by your power supply.

 

[edit]

 

I use an H60 (I think it was, might be a little larger), btw.

 

And actually, according to Core Temp, my high has only been 34 C.  (And I've played Skyrim and VTMB since the last reboot).  I live in Phoenix, AZ, but my office/closet is air conditioned and I keep it fairly cool compared to the rest of the house.

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I won't continue to state the obvious. Clearly it's running too hot and not just under load. The observation of dramatic temperature increases so quickly is only indicative of a problem in the installation of the cooling system. If the heatsink and fan were properly installed, you would not have the immediate rise in temperature upon load. You would at least see it take a few seconds to a minute to rise to 100C. With it being so immediate, it's clearly not installed properly, at least that's what makes sense to me.

 

As for a cooler recommendation: http://www.corsair.com/us/cpu-cooling-kits/hydro-series-water-cooling-cpu-cooler/hydro-series-h60-high-performance-liquid-cpu-cooler.html

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Too many possibilities...

 

First regarding thermal paste, take a look at this link:  http://innovationcooling.com/applicationinstructions.htm  (Doesn't matter if you use their paste, but shows you the impact of different application methods).

 

As long as the cooler is getting coverage/pressure, the stock cooler should suffice (but there are much better alternatives)... I can't comment on the Scythe cooler you have listed since it doesn't mention LGA1155, but most of them work so long as there is a universal adapter to make it work.  You do need sufficient pressure at the contact point, so yes it has to be "tight" otherwise you are essentially running without a cooler.

 

Assuming cooler is making appropriate contact/thermal paste is okay, then disable any fan controls in the BIOS (there should be a setting that forces the PWM fan to run at full speed).  Make sure you case is routing air as intended by the manufacturer (fan direction etc.).

 

Beyond that (assuming you don't have some crazy ambient temperatures) the 3770K runs hot to begin with, and standard BIOS settings are not always optimal (even if you are not overclocking).  I had a i7-920 that ran 10-15C hotter with "stock" settings then it did overclocked to 3.8Ghz (from 2.66)... go figure.  For the newer generation Intel processors, the biggest adjustments seem to come from the appropriate mix of under-volting + overclocking.

 

Anyway, just running out and buying a new cooler may leave you right where you started... the temperature difference between quality aftermarket coolers isn't huge, so you could end up wasting money and still have the same problem. 

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i've been eyeing the Corsair liquid coolers - the H90, H100i and the H110.

 

something tells me, though, that you have another issue - perhaps the case isnt providing enough airflow, you have too much cable clutter, or the CPU's IHS is detached...

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edit: ninja'd by JJ....  :shiftyninja:

 

Heh, I had to remove the IHS on my 3570k to replace Intel's 'chewing gum' paste so there Mr Google Guru.

 

If you have the balls, get a water cooling kit otherwise go for this:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Noctua-Heatsink-Cooling-Dual-NH-D14/dp/B002VKVZ1A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373377164&sr=8-1&keywords=noctua+dh-14

 

My CPU is overclocked to 4.3 GHz and temps never rise above 60c under full load: However I suspect the grease under your IHS has turned to gunk so you should look into that too.

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i've been eyeing the Corsair liquid coolers - the H90, H100i and the H110.

 

something tells me, though, that you have another issue - perhaps the case isnt providing enough airflow, you have too much cable clutter, or the CPU's IHS is detached...

 

As has been stated before, the idle temp and the rapid increase doesn't indicate any fault with his cooler or the case, it indicates the cooler isn't properly attached to the CPU at all. HE did mention something about a broken leg on the cooler, 3 properly attached legs "should" still have managed to keep it lower than it is though.

 

 

But as I said before, I to reccomend the corsair enclosed liquid coolers, not sure he needs the 90+ models though. he needs to make sure he can fit the radiator then, and he actually needs it. he'll also need to make sure the CPU is fully cleaned of old paste before replacing the cooler and make sure the attachment points on the mobo/case fr the cooler also isn't damaged to he gets a proper god tight attachment. 

Heh, I had to remove the IHS on my 3570k to replace Intel's 'chewing gum' paste so there Mr Google Guru.

 

If you have the balls, get a water cooling kit otherwise go for this:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Noctua-Heatsink-Cooling-Dual-NH-D14/dp/B002VKVZ1A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373377164&sr=8-1&keywords=noctua+dh-14

 

My CPU is overclocked to 4.3 GHz and temps never rise above 60c under full load: However I suspect the grease under your IHS has turned to gunk so you should look into that too.

there's no need for balls with the fully enclosed water cooling kits like the H60/90/100 series. they're as plug and play as a regular fan 

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By "balls" I meant the potential for a water cooling solution to leak and fry his mobo/CPU :)

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Yeah, even the enclosed ones can break as easily as a self made one. You're never safe from a spillage.

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They can break, but nowhere near as easily as a self made one no.

 

the corsairs, you can swing around like a flail and not damage the tubes or connections on them. 

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