Jump to content



Photo

Powercut, who is liable for damage?


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#16 Hum

Hum

    totally wAcKed

  • 63,471 posts
  • Joined: 05-October 03
  • Location: Odder Space
  • OS: Windows XP, 7

Posted 12 July 2013 - 13:40

What about the emotional damage I may suffer when I can't get on Neowin ... :/




#17 Aheer.R.S.

Aheer.R.S.

    I cannot Teach Him, the Boy has no Patience!

  • 12,031 posts
  • Joined: 15-October 10

Posted 12 July 2013 - 13:44

What about the emotional damage I may suffer when I can't get on Neowin ... :/

You mean the return to normality, right?



#18 roguekiller23231

roguekiller23231

    Neowinian

  • 184 posts
  • Joined: 26-March 11

Posted 12 July 2013 - 15:49

I have a Belkin Surge Protecter

 

If a device gets damaged by a surge etc which would effectively happen in a power cut you can claim back up to a certain limit

 

its a good product though and have never had to use the claim form

 

this is the one i have i bought it about 10 years ago though and it was around £40 then it covers devices up to £175k

 

http://www.amazon.co...surge protector

 

i believe your are no longer covered if you have had it for 10 years, if you check manufacturer websites (which i haven't), surge protectors usually only cover damage costs for a few years after purchase.



#19 Edrick Smith

Edrick Smith

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,210 posts
  • Joined: 14-April 03
  • Location: Boston, MA

Posted 12 July 2013 - 16:22

i believe your are no longer covered if you have had it for 10 years, if you check manufacturer websites (which i haven't), surge protectors usually only cover damage costs for a few years after purchase.

They come with a "lifetime" guarantee usually, although some I feel I've seen 10 year. The one he posted is lifetime however 



#20 jerzdawg

jerzdawg

    Neowinian

  • 5,406 posts
  • Joined: 09-October 02
  • Location: new jersey

Posted 12 July 2013 - 16:41

Warning, **** awful analogy incoming:

The "Einstein" of today would probably sue his own family for letting the apple drop on his head rather than it prompting him to spend time and effort researching something and coming up with a constructive solution.

Did you mean to say Newton instead of Einstein?



#21 roguekiller23231

roguekiller23231

    Neowinian

  • 184 posts
  • Joined: 26-March 11

Posted 12 July 2013 - 18:48

lifetime guarantee on the product, not the coverage should equipment get damaged. 

 

i remember when i registered mine, which most require you to do, registration of the product within a 2 weeks of purchase, and they tell you how long you are covered for, you also have to keep the original proof of purchase to make a claim. 

 

Most equipment will not get damaged anyway unless it's a cheap product. in the event of a power cut, most electronics will not get damaged from the power cut, but sometimes from the surge when it is turned back on. i usually turn off from the socket if there is a power cut.



#22 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • 22,195 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 12 July 2013 - 19:52

They come with a "lifetime" guarantee usually, although some I feel I've seen 10 year. The one he posted is lifetime however


Lifetime rarely if ever means "your" lifetime and is usually a fancy word for more than regulated minimum.

#23 arachnoid

arachnoid

    A day without sunshine is like night.

  • 4,686 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 11

Posted 12 July 2013 - 20:20

You should check your power suppliers small print but they may deny liability when informed of any faulty equipment damaged by the supply.Ergo the small claims court may be your last port of call if your house insurance doesnt cover it.



#24 leesmithg

leesmithg

    The Major!

  • 9,493 posts
  • Joined: 11-August 04
  • Location: Kings Hill, West Malling, Kent, England.

Posted 09 August 2013 - 07:00

I believe in the uk that applies to food kept in fridges/freezers and the power's out for more than 24 hours, and only covers the food
I could be wrong

In the U.K. utility companies don't give a hoot.

They charge far too much to appease their share holders (the rich and wealthy).

When their function goes ######'s up they insist it is your fault and you should have insurance.

My hybrid drive went from 100% to 70% after a power cut where I live for a few hours.

Luckily it was still under warranty and I sent it back for a replacement from amazon.co.uk

Where I live also, they don't give you notice by someone knocking on doors or a circualar giving prior warning lets say:

''on Friday November 1st 2013 at 14:00-15:30 the power will be closed down in your area for a needed repair''

sent a week before.

They just flick the switch.

#25 Richard C.

Richard C.

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,660 posts
  • Joined: 15-April 05
  • Location: Around
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro & Mac OSX
  • Phone: iPhone 5

Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:43

While in theory you can complain to the power companies about poor QoS, as leesmithg says, in practice they don't care and its quickly apparent that any contracts you have apply to you but not to them.



#26 arachnoid

arachnoid

    A day without sunshine is like night.

  • 4,686 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 11

Posted 09 August 2013 - 10:01

What about the emotional damage I may suffer when I can't get on Neowin ... :/

Said "shock" is covered under the all encompassing Neowin terms of service guarantee.In short this covers mandated self induced single digit disconnection techniques and the use of bipedal motion in the direction of the nearest recreational area of interest.



#27 +MikeChipshop

MikeChipshop

    Miniman

  • 7,460 posts
  • Joined: 02-October 06
  • Location: Scotland
  • OS: Windows 8, iOS, Android, WP8
  • Phone: HTC 8X / Nexus 5

Posted 09 August 2013 - 10:13

I successfully claimed back for a fridge freezer full of food once but that was after a 3 day outage. As far as i'm aware they're under no obligation to do that as it was caused by an act of god (Hurricane) and it was merely a gesture of good will.

 

This was UK based btw.



#28 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • 7,790 posts
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:06

If it is in warranty you could get the manufacturer to pay. If it is not you could possibly get your home insurance to pay but you still have to pay your deductible. In all honesty, it isn't worth that much in the grand scheme of things just suck it up if out of warranty and pick up a new one. It isn't a 10k+ loss.

Learn from your mistake and put a good ups that protects your equipment from these types of surges and lightening strikes. A good ups will condition the voltage and amps going to your computer equipment. Businesses do go looking to the government or to the power company for loss when there is a power outage.

#29 leqin

leqin

    Neowinian

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: 30-December 01

Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:37

The "Einstein" of today would probably sue his own family for letting the apple drop on his head rather than it prompting him to spend time and effort researching something and coming up with a constructive solution.
Newton meanwhile would have sued Einstein because Newton had copyright on the old 'Apple drop on his head' trick, but that would have only been after Apple sued Newton for using the word 'Apple' in a effort to describe gravity.


#30 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • 22,195 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:42

If it is in warranty you could get the manufacturer to pay. If it is not you could possibly get your home insurance to pay but you still have to pay your deductible. In all honesty, it isn't worth that much in the grand scheme of things just suck it up if out of warranty and pick up a new one. It isn't a 10k+ loss.

Learn from your mistake and put a good ups that protects your equipment from these types of surges and lightening strikes. A good ups will condition the voltage and amps going to your computer equipment. Businesses do go looking to the government or to the power company for loss when there is a power outage.

 

mixing a few things here though

 

He suffered a power loss, these shouldn't damage the equipment and the power company isn't liable outside of warning you of known power drops and eqipment should handle a power loss. for extended losses, they may be liable for certain things like food and heat.

 

For power surges however, the company is liable for any damages, they are contractually obliged to provide power within certain parameters, if there's a spike due to faulty equipment or lines on their or one of their partners side, they are liable for damage. 

 

for lighting, you should get a proper surge protector in your fuse box, but the power company isn't liable, this is an insurance case if there's damage. Chances are if there's a lighting strike that goes through the power lineS(these would be the big bad ones) a regular power socket surge protector won't help, you need one of these big fuse box ones with some kind of gas separation which instantly refuses to transfer power if it passes above a level, sure it may blow up if there's a good strike, but it'll save the rest of the house and fusebox.