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Posted

Starting a new thread because of major new info, images, and the upcoming maiden flight of the new Falcon 9 v1.1, the basis for F9-R - a reusable rocket.

Thread 1: http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/991330-spacex-updates-grasshopper-rlv/

Thread 2: http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1068372-spacex-updates-thread-2/

Thread 3: http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1122124-spacex-updates-thread-3/

New image dump and FH payload numbers

Falcon Heavy Payload to GTO: 21,200 kg ($135M)
Falcon Heavy Payload to Mars: 13,200 kg

Octaweb: F9 v1.1/F9R (9 engine cluster)
octaweb1.jpg
octaweb2.jpg

Octaweb FH/FHR (Falcon Heavy 27 engine cluster layout)
octawebfh.jpg

M1VacD (upper stage engine)
m1vacd.jpg

F9R landing leg
f9rleg1.jpg

Vandenberg SLC-4E F9/FH pad & landing site
vandy1.jpg
vandy2.jpg
vandy3.jpg

F9R (Falcon 9 Reusable) - Dragon config
f9r.jpg

FHR (Falcon Heavy Reusable) - cargo config
fhr.jpg
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Posted

Full list of FH payload numbers -

Falcon Heavy Payload to LEO: 53,000 kg
(Shuttle did 24,000 kg to LEO)

Falcon Heavy Payload to GTO: 21,200 kg
(Delta IV Heavy = 13,130 kg, Ariane 5 ECA = 10,500 kg)

Falcon Heavy Payload to Mars: 13,200 kg
(Curiosity's total = 3,893 kg)

Comparison of FH to world launchers
fhgraphic.jpg

First F9 v1.1/F9R core. Look close and you can see the lower landing leg attachments. These won't be used right away, but once the Grasshopper 2 project evolves to land landings they'll be ready to use them.
F9v1.1-1.jpg

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Posted

The F9R is the sexiest rocket ive ever seen

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Posted

You aren't the only one who thinks so, though in the expendable trim the legs aren't used, and the feature list just keeps climbing.

The first F9 v1.1/F9R has been shipped to Vandenberg where it'll be integrated, do some pad tests, then launch the CASSIOPE satellite for Canada.. Provisional date is Sept. 5th.

During that first flight SpaceX intends to try and "land" the first at sea (safer for a first try.) A new Grasshopper 2 based on F9 v1.1 will fly from SpacePort America in New Mexico, purpose being perfecting the land landing tech & software. Once done they can (hopefully) upload it into the operational rockets, attach the legs and go.

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Posted

So doc, the Grasshopper 2.0 config, when they fly that off new mexico, is that going to be an actual flight, or just the first stage going up to its targeted height and then coming back down to land?

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Posted

The latter - flights scaling up to 300,000 ft first stage profile simulations. Real launches of F9 will test that part of the profile from stage separation through the turnaround and return. The September 5 launch will try to do the deceleration & reentry without turning back with a legless water landing - a hail Mary. If it works it could shorten the F9R development.

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Posted

Good to hear, I hope it works for them, that way the world can see the F9R in service sooner, and thus reduce the cost of flights

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I think the attendance and webcast audience for the first land landing is going to be huge - like seeing a Robert A. Heinlein story come to life. Geekgasm.

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Posted

Does anybody know when we can expect the new Dragon to be revealed? I read in a previous topic there is supposed to be a drop test of Dragon this month, was hoping somebody had more info on this :)

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Posted

Does anybody know when we can expect the new Dragon to be revealed? I read in a previous topic there is supposed to be a drop test of Dragon this month, was hoping somebody had more info on this :)


There is a drop test of the SNC Dream Chaser spaceplane later this month. This will be a robotic flight, with the drop from 14,000 ft. After that altitudes and conditions get ramped up and sometime in 2014 crews will fly her in the atmosphere - very like the recent SpaceShipTwo tests. Once they're sure of her handling they'll light those 2 big honkin' hybrid rockets for power-on tests.

The pad abprt test of the crew Dragon's advanced SuperDraco based launch abort system (LAS) is set for December 2013 or early 2014. This test simulates escaping a disaster on the pad, something that was unsurvivable with the Shuttle. The reveal should be just before this test.

In mid-2014 another test of Dragon's LAS will be done during a full-up launch at Max-Q, the point of highest physical stress, to make sure it'll work under the harshest conditions. This was about when Challenger exploded.

An emergency in the first 3 minutes of a Shuttle launch was pretty much unsurvivable. SpaceX is designing Dragon the survive emergencies from the pad all the way to orbit
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Posted

We should have these threads pinned.

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Posted

Another big contract, this time with the German Ministry of Defense for recon satellites. This really has to irk Arianespace and Russia.

SPACEX IS AWARDED LAUNCH OF GERMAN RADAR RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITE SYSTEM

Falcon 9 rocket will deliver three-satellite SARah Constellation that will serve German Ministry of Defense

Hawthorne, CA

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Posted

I wonder how many of these SpaceX will end up with, for a security stand point not just cost. 

 

Since these are Government satellites maybe they didn't want the Russians to look at them... 

 

Since SpaceX is private the dont really have any interest in spying on what is going up.

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A lot of it is because the US Air Force is qualifying SpaceX to launch its national security payloads, including the big National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) spy satellites (bigger than Hubble.) Germany is a NATO partner so....

Fact is, SpaceX has built a big complex almost across the street from the NRO headquarters so they can work together easier.

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SpaceX's Dragon has passed a MAJOR design review for carrying NASA / ISS crews


NASA Commercial Crew Partner SpaceX Completes Orbit and Entry Review

RELEASE 13-255

NASA Commercial Crew Partner SpaceX Completes Orbit and Entry Review

NASA Commercial Crew Program (CCP) partner Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) recently reviewed the systems critical to sustaining crews in orbit and returning them safely to Earth aboard the company's Dragon spacecraft.

SpaceX is one of three commercial space companies working under NASA's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) initiative to develop spaceflight capabilities that eventually could provide launch services to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. soil.

During the preliminary design review at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif., company engineers presented NASA representatives and aerospace industry experts detailed analyses of Dragon systems critical to keeping crews safe in orbit and during re-entry operations. From basic life support functions, including pressurizing Dragon with breathable air, to stocking the capsule with enough food and water for as many as seven crew members, the spacecraft must be designed to protect humans in the harsh conditions of space. Company designers and NASA engineers dissected the plans carefully to make sure no details were overlooked.

"NASA has learned a lot about keeping our astronaut crews safe throughout a mission, and we don't want those lessons to be forgotten," said Ed Mango, NASA's CCP manager. "So, we're sharing a lot of what we already know, and the company is adding its own innovations to suit its needs and meet its challenges."

The review detailed equipment and software aboard Dragon that would help guide crews to the International Space Station for rendezvous and docking operations. This included discussion on SpaceX

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Posted

1) F9 v1.1 / CASSIOPE WDR (wet dress rehearsal) set for the last week of August. Hotfire a few days before launch, which is still set for NET Sept. 5th.

2) the recent Grasshopper "divert" test may have been the last one for McGregor. Not confirmed, but strongly rumored. If true later tests will be at SpacePort America.

3) CRS-3 to ISS is set for January 17, 2014.

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Posted

I wonder if SpaceX CRS-3 would get the december timeslot in case the Antares/Cygnus mission next month fails. SpaceX does have their pad abort test comming up in december, so their pad might not even be free for a CRS mission in case NASA should ask them to move back?!?

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CRS-3 is up for January 17 because Orbital's Cygnus got the earlier VV (visiting vehicle) slot. It's up to Orbital to make that slot or slip to one after SpaceX.

OTOH, SpaceX has several commercial paunches with stages already completed and in testing. CASSIOPE is F9 #6 and on the pad at Vandenberg, stage 7 (SES8) is at McGregor undergoing hotfire acceptance tests and stages 8, 9 and 10 prepping for shipment.

The production line is HUMMING.

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Posted

I know the CRS-3 is in the january slot because Cygnus is slated for december. What I mean is that in case next months COTS2/3 demo fails for Cygnus then they are obviously not going to get a december launch! In which case i wonder if NASA would open up that december slot to SpaceX again.

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Posted

No - if Cygnus slips SpaceX would not get the CRS-3 cargo in time to do a fast turnaround in time. Too many logistical issues now that the plan is January, plus they're moving commercial launches into the earlier timeframe.

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Posted

 

WASHINGTON

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Posted

The $20m is to pay for the govts share of the new parachute systems tests.

Recapping -

In Oct/Nov there will be a test of a new Dragon parachute system. The deployment mortar and drogue systems were modded to allow the faster deployment. This mod allows it to deploy faster and at lower altitudes after a launch pad abort, or in case the SuperDraco landing thrusters fail during a land touchdown (later Dragon will land using thrusters only - no chutes.)

Around December there will be a launch pad abort test of the SuperDraco's and the parachute systems - a Dragon will be mounted atop a simulated 2nd stage at their KSC pad. The SD's will fire as they would to pull Dragon away from a failing Falcon 9 booster and the parachutes will bring it down in the Atlantic just off the coast.

Another SuperDraco abort test will happen in early 2014 - a fully equipped Falcon 9 will launch a Dragon at KSC then suffer a simulated "failure" at MAX-Q (maximum dynamic pressure - about where Challenger failed), at which time the SuperDraco's will fire and pull the Dragon to safety. The parachutes will then bring it down in the Atlantic.

Pretty extensive tests of a highly advanced and redundant escape system, something the shuttle never had.

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Posted

Pretty extensive tests of a highly advanced snd redundant escape system, something the shuttle never had.

 

Was gonna say. They seem to be doing WAY more escape tests than NASA did...  Or is it more a case of there being more reporting these days?

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Was gonna say. They seem to be doing WAY more escape tests than NASA did... Or is it more a case of there being more reporting these days?

You cannot report on something Shuttle never had.

The only pad escape system Shuttle had was a zip-line from the launch tower to a bunker some distance away. The crew had to blow the hatch, crawl out and take turns sliding down the zip-line. Useless in a fast moving event.

After launch there were no launch abort options for the first 3 minutes of flight - basically until the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) separated. Before then any malfunction resulted in a loss of mission and crew (LOM & LOC.)

Early in the Shuttles development there were proposals for ejection seats (these were actually installed in the Enterprise testbed) and a parachute system that would eject the entire pressure vessel-capsule from the orbiter, but both were cut to maximize payload capacity and cut costs.

"Nothing can go wrong....wrong....wro...."

The capsule parachute system would have saved the Challenger crew as they survived the explosion, not dying until their crew capsule hit the water at 300 mph.

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