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Samsung caught optimizing its phones to score higher on benchmarks

 

It can be tricky figuring out which mobile device to buy. Some get longer battery life than the competition, while others offer more storage, memory, or special features like hands-free operation.

But some folks like to get the model with the fastest processor

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Posted

like I said before, he's just arguing for the sake of arguing. smurfs are purple you know...

:laugh:

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You're joking, right?

For the OIS system yes it is.

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according to math, you are wrong, all apps are given only a maximum of 90.2 % with the exception of only benchmarks apps.

 

Nope - evidence shows otherwise

 

it's not a matter of what I "believe", its just a simple matter of it being an industry standard of phones down-clocking to save on battery. There is no need to be rude.  :/  Just saying. I think you may have fallen into the trap of this article's author trying to pull a fast one on the S4's reputation.... I can see the temptation if someone dislikes Samsung. But this is a generally known feature of smart phone hardware 

 

That's a bingo!

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Nope - evidence shows otherwise

 

That's a bingo!

 

Funny thing is,  the OP supposedly is an android user, yet won't admit that facts, we shall call this case:

 

Reverse Fanboyism?   (ala reverse psychology)

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Posted

Hard Drives have been known to cheat on tests for quite sometime.  I know 90s for sure but maybe even 80s.  At least for enterprise grade.

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You can find more details at AnandTech, but in a nutshell, there are two versions of the Galaxy S4. Whether you have a model with a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa processor or a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 chip, the CPU will run at its highest speed while a benchmarking app is open.

 

No, really? Should run at mid speed or low speed while benching, then? Non sense, actually; synthetic benchs are supposed to measure how the hardware would perform when pushed to the limits. And trusting solely on a synthetic bench is dumb; real life work sets a different experience from the synth bench.

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Posted

 

 


You can find more details at AnandTech, but in a nutshell, there are two versions of the Galaxy S4. Whether you have a model with a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa processor or a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 chip, the CPU will run at its highest speed while a benchmarking app is open.

There like 4 versions of the s4  /trollfacehating samsung

 

the S4 octa version

the S4 S600 Lte enabled version

the S4 S800 LTE-A enabled

the S4 Active  Somethingelse

The S4 Zoom Somethingelse again.

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