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Samsung caught cheating on phone specs


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#46 Clirion

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 16:45

from that same article:

 

GPUclk_575px.png

 

Isn't this normal behavior (for the camera?) eg. throttle up when needed, throttle down when not?

 

It very much is.  It looks like only the camera app can do that at this point in time.  So we have the Benchmark app and the Camera App(in spurts).  This is neither good nor bad, it simply is.  Now, as long as all of that is known while ranking the "Fastest Cell Phone" and write up and comparison between phones,  I see no real problem with it. 




#47 HawkMan

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 16:46

We did read, we are trying to point out to you how that same article is being sensationalist, as the phones operation won't probably be affected in average day to day use.

 

Wait... so my GPU clocks up ( es per the driver) when I play dead space, so that's cheating? Ok.  What anandtech MIGHT have a point is that this should be user toggled, however, how many average joes care about such an issue?

 

The issue here is that the GPU DOESN'T clock up when you play games or do anythingm the max it clocks up to is 480Mhz, the only time it clocks up to 530Mhz, is when it detects a benchmark app. 

 

Basically whenever the phone detects benchmarking it overclocks, because it can't sustain that clock speed during normal operations. and all the reviewers will use the benchmark numbers, that they are not aware are fake to show how the phone is over 10% faster than the competition. 



#48 .Markus

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 16:49

Not shocking that it occurs, however something definitely to keep in mind next time benchmarks are being posted comparing model x to model y....



#49 majortom1981

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 16:59

I thought they all did it? Nokia was caught out promoting their stabilizer while filming on the move too :p

Nokis problem was that the 920 was just as good as the dslrs they used .



#50 Buttus

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:14

LOL at the people who think the CPU and GPU should be going 100% full speed while reading email or something...

 

i want the thing blasting fast when i'm doing something that needs it!



#51 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:16

Nokis problem was that the 920 was just as good as the dslrs they used .

You're joking, right?



#52 +techbeck

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:23

from what i am reading, more then just the artical posted, this is indeed what they are doing...
and about the idevice loyalty? you sir are one blind dumbass...


Maybe it is just me, but I find that people who have to toss out insults to prove their point not worth listening to.

People need to relax. This is a discussion...we are all adults, at least I hope so. I wouldnt be surprised if more phone companies do things like this. Samsung is just a hot target since they are the largest and probably looked at the closest.

#53 dead.cell

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:26

LOL at the people who think the CPU and GPU should be going 100% full speed while reading email or something...

 

i want the thing blasting fast when i'm doing something that needs it!

 

That's not the problem here at all. People are glancing over the article and thinking this is just the equivalent of what Intel does with their TurboBoost. (to be fair, the OP didn't explain this well either)

 

The problem is that... say you had a processor that ran at 2.4GHz, with TurboBoost that could spot you up to 3.2GHz when you needed it. Fantastic, right? Now imagine if it ONLY jumped up to 3.2GHz when you were running benchmark software; hitting only up to 2.8GHz with any other demanding program.

 

That's the problem here, at least as best as I've understood it out to be. Why would they bother advertising beyond what is actually tangible? (rhetorical question, we all know the answer)



#54 Lord Method Man

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:32

That's not the problem here at all. People are glancing over the article and thinking this is just the equivalent of what Intel does with their TurboBoost. (to be fair, the OP didn't explain this well either)

 

The problem is that... say you had a processor that ran at 2.4GHz, with TurboBoost that could spot you up to 3.2GHz when you needed it. Fantastic, right? Now imagine if it ONLY jumped up to 3.2GHz when you were running benchmark software; hitting only up to 2.8GHz with any other demanding program.

 

That's the problem here, at least as best as I've understood it out to be. Why would they bother advertising beyond what is actually tangible? (rhetorical question, we all know the answer)

 

Except its already been shown that real applications DO in fact hit the 533 MHz mark.



#55 +-T-

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:33

Sounds very similar to what AMD and Nvidia do when their drivers detect benchmarks being run. Nothing new here really, it's hardly even a story

#56 dead.cell

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:34

Except its already been shown that real applications DO in fact hit the 533 MHz mark.

 

I'm not arguing either side, I'm merely trying to explain the situation. :ermm:



#57 Yusuf M.

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:59

That's not the problem here at all. People are glancing over the article and thinking this is just the equivalent of what Intel does with their TurboBoost. (to be fair, the OP didn't explain this well either)

 

The problem is that... say you had a processor that ran at 2.4GHz, with TurboBoost that could spot you up to 3.2GHz when you needed it. Fantastic, right? Now imagine if it ONLY jumped up to 3.2GHz when you were running benchmark software; hitting only up to 2.8GHz with any other demanding program.

 

That's the problem here, at least as best as I've understood it out to be. Why would they bother advertising beyond what is actually tangible? (rhetorical question, we all know the answer)

It's not entirely the same. The limiting factor with smartphones is battery life. If that wasn't a limiting factor, then Samsung would have no issues with running the CPU or GPU at full speed. It's possible but it isn't feasible.



#58 vcfan

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 18:08

Sounds very similar to what AMD and Nvidia do when their drivers detect benchmarks being run. Nothing new here really, it's hardly even a story

 

right, everybody cheats. nvidia,apple,intel,amd,sony,samsung, etc... you know for example when nvidia is pimping their latest mobile gpu,how they say its 2x the performance? it may be true that you can get 2x the performance, but what they dont tell you is,at what power envelope? in the real world, the gpu is not running full on blast,because that would just destroy the battery,therefore real world performance is not 2x,not even close.



#59 dead.cell

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 18:16

It's not entirely the same. The limiting factor with smartphones is battery life. If that wasn't a limiting factor, then Samsung would have no issues with running the CPU or GPU at full speed. It's possible but it isn't feasible.

 

Except that's not the argument. Again, (and please correct me if I'm wrong) it's that the full speed is not tangible unless the program being used is benchmarking software...



#60 +-T-

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 18:26

Except that's not the argument. Again, (and please correct me if I'm wrong) it's that the full speed is not tangible unless the program being used is benchmarking software...


I believe it has been shown other apps can utilise the full speed. Making this a completely pointless, non-issue