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Is it IT's job to babysit or teach?


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#1 expphoto

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:19

First, let me start with my definitions.

 

Babysit: Do everything for them, presume they know absolutely nothing. Making little to no effort to be proactive in making sure they know basic functions

Teach: Do the hard stuff for them, expect them to have a common knowledge of how to use their computers (in which they work on everyday). Be proactive in making sure they know how to perform basic functions.

Common Knowledge: Ability to navigate a Windows Machine, such as accessing programs from the start menu, using USB drives, copy and paste, moving files, etc. Also being able to follow directions. 

 

My co-worker and I have a different view on this. I think people should be forced to know the basic functions, he says people don't care and that it's our job to do it for them. 

 

What are your opinions on this overall? 


Edited by jeston, 31 July 2013 - 23:28. Reason: Edited per OP request.



#2 +techbeck

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:33

If you need to use a computer to do your job, you should know how to do your job yourself and know the basics. Now, if something more technical comes along, but all means...ask for assistance. However, I would expect that person to take notes or retain that info for future use. I have my own job...I am not going to do someone elses.

#3 _dandy_

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:33

What are your opinions on this overall? 

 

I've been in a situation where, after having to fix something (the same thing) for a user a number of times, I've offered to show said user the steps.

 

To which said user got mad and I was told, "I don't care, JUST MAKE IT WORK".

 

That's what I get for prompt service.  What I've found is that the longer a user has to wait for someone to show up for a fix, the more they're willing to learn how to fix something themselves.

 

No more Mr. Nice Guy.



#4 Som

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:34

I've found that the more ignorant they are, the more they yell, some people are just jerks

 

 

First, let me start with my definitions.

 

Babysit: Do everything for them, presume they know absolutely nothing. Making little to no effort to be proactive in making sure they know basic functions

Teach: Do the hard stuff for them, expect them to have a common knowledge of how to use their computers (in which they work on everyday). Be proactive in making sure they know how to perform basic functions.

Common Knowledge: Ability to navigate a Windows Machine, such as accessing programs from the start menu, using USB drives, copy and paste, moving files, etc. Also being able to follow directions. 

 

My co-worker and I have a different view on this. I think people should be forced to know the basic functions, he says people don't care and that it's our job to do it for them. 

 

An example. I swapped a computer out last night before I left. Data transferring overnight onto an external. Our computers are imaged the same way, the only differences are a few shortcuts we create. I left a note how to get going in the am. IE. Do this to login. To access your email, open outlook and click continue until you see your mail, and if you need your files before I get in, feel free to grab them off the USB drive sitting on your laptop. So I get yelled at for not doing everything for them because she didn't know the basic functions. 

 

What are your opinions on this overall? 



#5 +techbeck

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:34

That's what I get for prompt service.  What I've found is that the longer a user has to wait for someone to show up for a fix, the more they're willing to learn how to fix something themselves.


I will purposely delay service at times. At least 1/2 the time (give or take), the user will figure it out themselves.

#6 McKay

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:35

If you babysit, you'll have the same problems over and over again. If you teach, people will learn how to solve some of their own problems.



#7 Som

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:40

I will purposely delay service at times. At least 1/2 the time (give or take), the user will figure it out themselves.

oh I also use the "scotty" technique (from star trek)... tell people it will take twice as long as you know it takes, then when it's done fast they think your great :p



#8 +Bryan R.

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:40

Babysitting people is what will burn you out. People need to have some self reliance. It's absolutely unacceptable to have to babysit people through navigating the start menu. With that said, from time to time, I do end up helping with basic stuff like this because the people really are that stupid sometimes.



#9 +techbeck

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:41

oh I also use the "scotty" technique (from star trek)... tell people it will take twice as long as you know it takes, then when it's done fast they think your great :p


I do to, but it also depends. If the person I am helping is cute, I will take a longer time or give them a quicker response to their problem. haha

I always over estimate anyway since sometimes something unexpected happens and you need the extra time.

#10 Geoffrey B.

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:42

i am not certain of many other places however, i have taken it upon myself at each of the locations i have worked to not just fix problems but educate as to what caused the problem and steps to take to prevent it from happening.

 

Since i have been working at my current company (19 months now) I have been able to create an entire section on SharePoint for self help as well as education on how to do certain tasks. And in conjunction with our training department we have started doing basic how to classes for things once a month.



#11 Pam14160

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:48

. . .Both.

 

That is really their job. . .as a former IT director (IFS - Information Systems) my people were there to do training, help desk, and repairs (covers a large area) along with whatever other task may apply.



#12 majortom1981

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:49

First, let me start with my definitions.

 

Babysit: Do everything for them, presume they know absolutely nothing. Making little to no effort to be proactive in making sure they know basic functions

Teach: Do the hard stuff for them, expect them to have a common knowledge of how to use their computers (in which they work on everyday). Be proactive in making sure they know how to perform basic functions.

Common Knowledge: Ability to navigate a Windows Machine, such as accessing programs from the start menu, using USB drives, copy and paste, moving files, etc. Also being able to follow directions. 

 

My co-worker and I have a different view on this. I think people should be forced to know the basic functions, he says people don't care and that it's our job to do it for them. 

 

An example. I swapped a computer out last night before I left. Data transferring overnight onto an external. Our computers are imaged the same way, the only differences are a few shortcuts we create. I left a note how to get going in the am. IE. Do this to login. To access your email, open outlook and click continue until you see your mail, and if you need your files before I get in, feel free to grab them off the USB drive sitting on your laptop. So I get yelled at for not doing everything for them because she didn't know the basic functions. 

 

What are your opinions on this overall? 

You must not be in IT very long. IT is the first dept to get people laid off. They see you not doing anything they will lay you off. teaching people how to use programs gets you seen. Which means job security.

 

I got laid off from my very first IT job because I did it so well That I had free time. Instantly laid off .



#13 +Frank B.

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:50

I consider being the 'IT guy' a service. I will do as required: Some users are more computer literate than others, so I will explain/teach for some, babysit for others. There is no use forcing someone who just wants to use his/her PC to learn technical details other users will be interested in.

 

tl;dr: Both are an option, depending on who you deal with.



#14 OP expphoto

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:53

You must not be in IT very long. IT is the first dept to get people laid off. They see you not doing anything they will lay you off. teaching people how to use programs gets you seen. Which means job security.

 

I got laid off from my very first IT job because I did it so well That I had free time. Instantly laid off .

 

Wait, so are you saying to teach them or not? 



#15 +Bryan R.

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 17:54

After reading other replies here, it should be understood that specific job titles and business sizes will differ on this. For a Systems Admin or Network Admin, it is a huge waste of time and resources to have to train idiots on an every day basis. For help desk roles, it will probably be an inevitable part of the job.