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Ballmer to Retire

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#121 MorganX

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 23:06

Well, I started to write a response but I'm sure we could both discuss this all day and we're already going off topic. It all comes down to, as always, using whatever works best for you. I was a long time iTunes user that hasn't used it for the last couple of years because I don't like it as much as the alternatives anymore. If you like it, then there's nothing wrong with it.

 

It's long in the tooth, but it's quickest and easiest for me, and does what I want. I'm hopeful Microsoft will get its act together.




#122 PGHammer

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 23:41

I don't see it as a flop. I did until I installed 8.1 Preview. I think timing sucked, and the software sucked, and the dearth of meaningful Modern UI apps sucked(s).

 

But the concept and the hardware were and are excellent with negligible flaws. I definitely things as the software matures and materializes, it has a big upside. Just going to take a while. I'm not sure it was the economy. I think the economy did affect PC Sales among other factors. Still with the decline, it's a decline of perennial massive growth.

Also known as a hiccup, or a pause.

 

Hiccups and pauses are known to happen during periods of otherwise-steady growth - in fact, look at automobiles sales (in the United States alone) from 1947 until the first OPEC embargo (simultaneous with the second Mideast War).

 

It's even happened in PCs before - specifically, 2004 AND 2005; 2005 was the biggest lull in terms of desktops (the form-factor, that is) until 2011.  (What saved the PC industry as a whole?  The shift to portable computers - specifically, notebooks and lighter laptops.)

 

Note this was ALSO during the Great XP Overhang (2002-2006).

 

2004 and 2005 were pretty good in terms of the economy - the Great Recession had not begun anywhere.

 

The first iteration of what would become Vista (Longhorn) was not only still based on XP (desktop) code, it was still in early alpha testing.  (What even the Steves - Ballmer AND Sinofsky - would bemoan as the Great Longhorn Code Reboot - was two years down the road.)  Two hedge bets based on XP - Tablet PC Edition and Media Center Edition - would launch in  mid-2005.  XP Professional x64 Edition would come in limited release in late 2005.



#123 PGHammer

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 00:09

It's long in the tooth, but it's quickest and easiest for me, and does what I want. I'm hopeful Microsoft will get its act together.

Microsoft has likely had to wait until it was less encumbered by regulatory compliance - how much in terms of encumbering ran out either during the initial beta-test period of Windows 8 or (in the case of EU litigation) after the launch of Windows 8?  I mentioned (in a previous post in this thread) the encumbering foisted on Microsoft over IE's inclusion;  the majority of said encumbrance was by result of the EU litigation - not the consent decree in the United States.  There have been attempts on renewed litigation since over mere supposition of violations of that consent decree - unfortunately, due to how quickly some companies are to sic lawyers on Microsoft, had the various ModernUI teams actually gotten their act together, lawyers would even now be arguing that Microsoft violated those same encumbrances.  Yes; some lawyers actually DO think that way.  (I saw a recent interview with one such lawyer - by John Stossel - that proves out the nickname "shark" given to some types of trial lawyers.  If he went swimming, all except the least self-respecting shark would not touch him due to fear of indigestion.)

 

The Law of Unintended Consequences comes very much into play, as does what I call "Spock's Proverb" (what Spock said to Stonn after T'Pring told her reason for basically sicking Spock on his own CO during "Amok Time") - "You may yet learn that having is not necessarily as good as wanting."



#124 shozilla

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 00:20

Each company has ups and downs.  No one is perfect. We make mistakes sometimes.



#125 PGHammer

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 00:38

Each company has ups and downs.  No one is perfect. We make mistakes sometimes.

Precisely.  However, that tends not to matter to lawyers.



#126 Growled

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 00:48

 I'm hopeful Microsoft will get its act together.

I suspect they may in time, but it is going to take some time. Major corporations move slowly and I figure we'll be several CEO's down the road before they get things straightened out.



#127 Shiranui

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 00:49

Retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement,

retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement, retirement .... yes! 



#128 PGHammer

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 08:15

Well, I started to write a response but I'm sure we could both discuss this all day and we're already going off topic. It all comes down to, as always, using whatever works best for you. I was a long time iTunes user that hasn't used it for the last couple of years because I don't like it as much as the alternatives anymore. If you like it, then there's nothing wrong with it.

AJerman, that is the point I have been, in fact, been TRYING to make since the Developer Preview of Windows 8.

 

I have, in point of fact, been pointing out that the choice of what sort of applications to use - Win32, Win64, or ModernUI - is up to the user (and the developer).  Not Microsoft.  Naturally, there is no real choice if a developer only makes applications or apps for one choice - however, that is not Microsoft's fault.  (It's not the user's fault, either.)

 

Number of my Windows 7 applications and games that have failed to migrate to Windows 8 OR Windows 8.1 Preview - zero.  That's right - every application and game that Ii ran in Windows 7 that was NOT mooted by an OS-included feature I still use in Windows 8.1 Preview today - without exception.  (Virtual Clone Drive doesn't count for the understandable and sensible reason that it WAS mooted by a now-included OS feature - disc-image mounting.  Diskeeper?  Mooted by Disk Optimizer - I mentioned this in another thread.)

 

Are there Windows Vista or 7-based features that I use more in Windows 8 or 8.1?  Yes - Quick Launch in particular is one I use a lot more than I did in Windows 7 OR Vista; however, Taskbar pinning AND the SuperBar (both of which also carry over) are second and third, respectively.

 

Missing feature I wish for?  One missing feature I still wish for - a PowerShell CLI prompt from QuickTask.  (Server 2012R2 DOES have that feature from its version of QuickTask, as does Server 2012 itself - both have the feature in the Explorer ribbon; however, Windows 8 and 8.1 both lack it in QuickTask, while both include it in the Explorer ribbon.)  That really makes no sense, especially since PowerShell is a scripting language across both client and server versions of Windows alike.