Jump to content



Photo

Would using a desktop PC as wifi repeater slow LAN traffic?


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 moeburn

moeburn

    tracer bullet

  • Joined: 10-March 04
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 24 August 2013 - 19:39

My wireless laptop is pretty far from the router; at least 2 floors and at times even brick walls and in the shed.  But it's usually right next to my wired desktop PC.  I only have one ethernet cable running down here, otherwise I'd wire the laptop too.  Besides, I often need to bring the laptop elsewhere, and I wouldn't want to have my torrents switching networking adapters and losing connections everytime I switch from wired to wifi.

 

I happen to have a 7-year-old Linksys WMP54G PCI Wireless-G card that I don't use, and its got a nice big hefty antenna, which makes me think it has some nice transmit power too.  I was thinking of putting it in the wired desktop PC, and having the desktop PC act as an access point, bridging the wifi with the LAN.  Before I go and figure out how to do all that, would it even be worth it?  I often need to use all of my available network bandwidth, because I use BTSync between the computers, but I only get about 2mB/s between my laptop and desktop, thats only double my WAN speed!  I was hoping that having a wifi repeater would help out the speeds, but would the PC bridge act as a bottle neck and result in not any significant net speed gain?




#2 psionicinversion

psionicinversion

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 16-June 05

Posted 24 August 2013 - 19:55

well im not sure but i think you can only turn routers into access points, a wireless card wont do that i think. If the card has an option to be used as an access point then turn it on and try. if it hasnt it prolly cant be

 

oh and its prolly got a big antenna cus its 7 years old haha



#3 OP moeburn

moeburn

    tracer bullet

  • Joined: 10-March 04
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 24 August 2013 - 19:58

well im not sure but i think you can only turn routers into access points, a wireless card wont do that i think. If the card has an option to be used as an access point then turn it on and try. if it hasnt it prolly cant be

 

oh and its prolly got a big antenna cus its 7 years old haha

 

I'm pretty sure they can, as long as you have another network card to talk to the router, and I'm using my mobo's ethernet for that.  For example, there are many guides on how to do the other way around; use a wireless laptop as a wired access point, because back in the day the Xbox 360 didn't have a built in wifi adapter, and the USB one was like $80 or something ridiculous, so people just used their wifi laptops, wired with a patch ethernet cable to the xbox, as a network bridge.



#4 primexx

primexx

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 6
  • Joined: 24-April 05

Posted 24 August 2013 - 20:26

yea, you can. If your link to the router is gigabit you shouldn't notice any speed issues at all.



#5 OP moeburn

moeburn

    tracer bullet

  • Joined: 10-March 04
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 24 August 2013 - 20:38

yea, you can. If your link to the router is gigabit you shouldn't notice any speed issues at all.

 

The router is gigabit, the network adapter is gigabit, but the cables are only 100mbit. So I only see about 11mBytes/s out of btsync when I'm wired.  But I'm only getting 1-2mB wireless, which is 8-16mbit, but DD-WRT says the wireless laptop is connected at 65mbit TX, 54mbit RX.



#6 +BudMan

BudMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 96
  • Joined: 04-July 02
  • Location: Schaumburg, IL
  • OS: Win7, Vista, 2k3, 2k8, XP, Linux, FreeBSD, OSX, etc. etc.

Posted 24 August 2013 - 23:12

"but the cables are only 100mbit"

What?? And what cables are those? 1000Base-T was designed and in the spec to be able to run over cat5, there really is no such thing as a 100mbit cable.. Unless you got some really old cat 3 using 4 wires?

Dude just go by any ole wireless cheap ass $20 router and use it as an AP.

Here
http://www.pc-canada.../TL-WR740N.html

18.99 CDN, why would you spend time dicking around trying to make your desktop into AP? You think your performance sucks now, bridge in your interface with wireless watch the hit..

I would also look into why your not getting gig?? Any $2 Cat 5 or 5e cable is capable of gig so replace them if you think they are bad.. Its almost hard to buy only cat5 these days they are all 5e.. But walk into your local computer store to get robbed they are only a couple of bucks.

Here is 25 footer.. Which you prob don't need? for whole 5.50 CDN
http://www.cablesale...CNET5E-25B.html

#7 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:12

The router is gigabit, the network adapter is gigabit, but the cables are only 100mbit. So I only see about 11mBytes/s out of btsync when I'm wired.  But I'm only getting 1-2mB wireless, which is 8-16mbit, but DD-WRT says the wireless laptop is connected at 65mbit TX, 54mbit RX.


That's G wireless for you, 54 is closer to 21 in reality, if you're really really lucky.

So yeah, just get a cheap router/AP/repeater

#8 OP moeburn

moeburn

    tracer bullet

  • Joined: 10-March 04
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:13

That's G wireless for you, 54 is closer to 21 in reality, if you're really really lucky.

So yeah, just get a cheap router/AP/repeater

 

Except it's supposed to be N wireless.  Maybe I haven't set it up in the linux laptop right.



#9 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 25 August 2013 - 10:10

I happen to have a 7-year-old Linksys WMP54G PCI Wireless-G card that I don't use

 

Talking about this. 

 

also your wireless speeds now indicate you are running at G, quite possibly you have another G device on the network. in which case if you don't have a more modern router that has a function to separate G devices on the network, it will slow down the whole network to G speeds. 



#10 +BudMan

BudMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 96
  • Joined: 04-July 02
  • Location: Schaumburg, IL
  • OS: Win7, Vista, 2k3, 2k8, XP, Linux, FreeBSD, OSX, etc. etc.

Posted 25 August 2013 - 13:03

"modern router that has a function to separate G devices on the network, it will slow down the whole network to G speeds. "

Only way to do that would be dual band, where N are on 1 and G is on the other.

Wireless is SHARED, its like a highway getting stuck behind a slow driver. If you have Slow talkers then your fast talkers will get slowed down.. Is not as bad as B but G will slow down N just for the fact that they can not talk as fast.

So unless you can put say all your G on the 2.4 and let your N talk on 5 your going to slow down everyone putting G an N together.

But I am more interested in this 100mbit wire thing.

#11 grabageek

grabageek

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 08-November 12
  • Location: Derby
  • OS: Linux, Windows, Android

Posted 25 August 2013 - 13:13

My advice is have a play with the PC acting as a bridge/booster and see what works. I have used PC's as wifi bridges and Boosters and it does work but there is no one size fits all solution so give it a go, you cant hurt anything at the end of the day.



#12 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 25 August 2013 - 15:04

"modern router that has a function to separate G devices on the network, it will slow down the whole network to G speeds. "

Only way to do that would be dual band, where N are on 1 and G is on the other.

Wireless is SHARED, its like a highway getting stuck behind a slow driver. If you have Slow talkers then your fast talkers will get slowed down.. Is not as bad as B but G will slow down N just for the fact that they can not talk as fast.

So unless you can put say all your G on the 2.4 and let your N talk on 5 your going to slow down everyone putting G an N together.

But I am more interested in this 100mbit wire thing.

 

 

Not true. my Asus, as well my my older linksys has an option that's specifically isolates G devices on the network so they don't affect the speed of N devices. 

 

Granted I generally put any device I can on the 5 Ghz network. 

Attached Images

  • bgprotection.jpg


#13 OP moeburn

moeburn

    tracer bullet

  • Joined: 10-March 04
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 25 August 2013 - 15:07

"modern router that has a function to separate G devices on the network, it will slow down the whole network to G speeds. "

Only way to do that would be dual band, where N are on 1 and G is on the other.

Wireless is SHARED, its like a highway getting stuck behind a slow driver. If you have Slow talkers then your fast talkers will get slowed down.. Is not as bad as B but G will slow down N just for the fact that they can not talk as fast.

So unless you can put say all your G on the 2.4 and let your N talk on 5 your going to slow down everyone putting G an N together.

But I am more interested in this 100mbit wire thing.

 

Okay, it was my father who wired this house, and he told me he used "100mbit only" wires.  However, I'm staring at the oldest ethernet wire in the house, and it clearly says "Gigabit CAT5e" on it.  Silly dad.  

 

So I have a gigabit router, and a gigabit ethernet card, and gigabit wires.  Now I gotta figure out why I'm running in 100mbit mode

 

EDIT: Right clicking on my "Marvell Yukon 88E8071 PCI-E Gigabit", clicking properties, configure, advanced, Speed & Duplex, it is set to "auto", but the only other options listed are 10mbit and 100mbit full and half duplex.  Perhaps my drivers aren't using my card properly?

 

As for the wireless speeds; well pretty much every device in this house is running on Wireless-N, except for a printer, and an old laptop.  I have the router set to "NG Mixed", so I would assume those two G-only devices are slowing everyone else to G speeds.

 

But I DO have another, completely unused band in the router!  The router is a dual-band 2.4ghz and 5ghz router.  We disabled the 5ghz band because it didn't have useable range; you had to be in the same room as the router to even see the 5ghz SSID.  Is there any way I could configure the 5ghz band to be a 2.4ghz N access point?  Or do they use fixed-clock crystals, forcing it to be 5ghz no matter what?  



#14 +BudMan

BudMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 96
  • Joined: 04-July 02
  • Location: Schaumburg, IL
  • OS: Win7, Vista, 2k3, 2k8, XP, Linux, FreeBSD, OSX, etc. etc.

Posted 25 August 2013 - 15:15

"Now I gotta figure out why I'm not running in gigabit mode."

So your nic shows 100mbit?

nic1gig.png


edit
as to your drivers not showing option for hard code to 1000, this is quite common. Gig should always be auto negotiated, hard coding breaks stuff in the spec.

driversnic.png

Ir your on auto and its not showing gig.. Then something wrong with the cable as hawkman says below, or the other end is not in gig either.. Sure your router or where that cable goes is gig, what is your router spec, is there a switch between you and the router.. Maybe those wires in the walls all run to a distribution switch in the basement or something that is only 100mbit.

Simple test to see if wire in the walls - take any other patch cable and connect using that known good cable.

Maybe your dad only hooked up 4 of the 8 wires? ;) Yeah never going to work gig then..

#15 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 25 August 2013 - 15:40

the cable quality may in some cases cause the equipment to only allow syncing at 100 though. 

I know I need to redo the cable between the first and second floor in my house since to much pulling and bending of it at to high angle caused it to only allow syncing at 100.