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Steve Ballmer’s ‘failure’ illustrated in a single chart


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#46 Enron

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 11:49

You mean to tell me more smartphones are sold than PCs and that this is all Windows 8's fault?!

 

I get it. Windows 8 is so bad that people run far away from their PC and realize they still need some kind of computer, so they get a smartphone instead.




#47 Mr Nom Nom's

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:13

Were that true, then Apple's laptop and desktop sales should be skyrocketing.

 

Of course, they aren't, are they?  No...people are moving to more mobile and portable devices: tablets and smartphones.  I am sure it is easier to place blame on Microsoft though than look at the bigger picture.  Laptops and desktops have been "good enough" for a while and have not inspired people to upgrade.  That alone will cause PC sales to drop.

 

You're assuming that you can just drop in a Mac and replace what you have with minimum drama which simply isn't the case.



#48 Sandor

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:22

And once again Windows 8 is the root cause of Microsoft's downfall, the MS fanboy defense patrol and apologists will certainly deny this but worldwide statistics prove it. The Windows 8 adoption rate has been a disaster, not to mention the lackluster WP platform which barely took off after 3 years. Microsoft cannot simply compete with Apple, they will only fail by doing so. Ballmer shot himself in the foot when he alienated the whole PC with all this unwanted touchscreen garbage which the average joe considers to be cumbersome, inappropriate, meaningless and totally fugly on a traditional PC.

top comedy.

 

You know Win8 will pass OSX usage any day now right? Less than a year after release?

 

You'll find WP8 doing rather well in a lot of countries around the world too. It's not an overnight thing to just become top dog.



#49 adrynalyne

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:58

You're assuming that you can just drop in a Mac and replace what you have with minimum drama which simply isn't the case.

Not really.

 

As I mentioned before, most consumers upgrade due to need, not want of a new OS.  So, if they must upgrade, and Windows 8 is their choice, and they hate it...OS X is the logical answer.

If they don't choose OS X (and sales make that clear), then the answer must logically fall upon the lack of need to upgrade (vs. Windows 8 being the cause).



#50 LaP

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:11

lol at making a separate line for consumer vs corporate pcs.

 

Why lol ???

 

Corporate and consumer are 2 very very different beasts.



#51 LaP

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:16

I agree with that. I also agree that you probably should separate them. But I think it's more important to see consumer Windows licenses vs. Corporate Windows licenses vs OEM licenses as opposed to PC sales.

 

Yeah you are right they should separate the licenses instead of the hardware.

 

I've seen many nany many times a computer in the corporate world having a windows 7 license but having XP or even linux installed on it. I've never ever seen a blackberry or windows phone with android on it ;)



#52 LaP

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:26

I think you are exactly right. Windows has gotten too reliable. If it's working, and working fine, people don't see a need to upgrade.

 

So basically Gates strategy to make Windows 9x bad was a good one ;)

 

it's a joke



#53 jake1eye

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:35

I like the Surface Pro it a well design piece of hardware, but I still went out

and bought an Nexus 7 with android because I hate Windows 8 that much.



#54 +warwagon

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:43

I agree, Windows 8 has been a disaster for Microsoft.

 

Whether or not the the bad press of Windows 8 has been spread by people who have used it or people who haven't , the bad press is there. I was at a customers house a few days ago and she was talking about a new computer, she asked about windows 8, she said "I've heard such horrible things about it, everyone hates it". Now the MS fanboys can deny the bad press is out there, but I can tell you first hand (as someone who deals with the average person) I hear this every time the word "Windows 8" is mentioned.

 

Then I got a call from an older couple who got a new computer with windows 8, they called me because they were "Sooooo confused", they said "we are about ready to take this computer back".

 

Then the neighbor kid who is in 8th grade talked to me about Windows 8, he said, i'm glad I already had a computer with windows 8 because they just got windows 8 at the school and EVERYONE is struggling. They are all so confused.

 

Now to be fair not everyone hates windows 8, a few like it.



#55 Growled

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 18:50

^ It does have bad press. Anyone who denies that is crazy. I have several friends that has either used it at home or at work, and not one of them likes it. In fact, it's completely the opposite. They all hate it and they tell all their friends how awful it is. Word gets around. 



#56 +MikeChipshop

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 18:57

Lol, creative figure management.

#57 typu

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 19:00

reality is way more complex. that line is on a far higher Level than any other consumer product. direct comparison Fails.



#58 Lord Method Man

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 19:08

 

 

Then I got a call from an older couple who got a new computer with windows 8, they called me because they were "Sooooo confused", they said "we are about ready to take this computer back".

 

 

Funny, those are the people that Windows 8 was supposedly going to be made for. Remember the "Why we need Windows 8" thread?

 

I've yet to meet anyone who got a new Windows 8 system who didn't hate the Modern UI, most tell me they want Windows 7 on it instead.



#59 PGHammer

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 19:36

^ It does have bad press. Anyone who denies that is crazy. I have several friends that has either used it at home or at work, and not one of them likes it. In fact, it's completely the opposite. They all hate it and they tell all their friends how awful it is. Word gets around. 

Yes - it has bad press.  However, the issue isn't the bad press, but whether the bad press (be it of Windows 8, or Steve Ballmer, or even Microsoft as a whole) is justified.

 

A little tidbit from yesterday's monstrous and wide-ranging stock selloff - out of the entire five hundred companies in the Standard and Poor's Major Corporation Index (known as the S&P 500 all over the planet) just two of the five hundred gained over the previous day's close - Microsoft and Alcoa.  Going merely by the numbers, Windows 8, or even Surface, can't be but so much of a problem. (While Google isn't part of the S&P, Apple is - and Apple followed the herd; the direction opposite of Microsoft.)  Unlike Alcoa (aluminum is a :"conflict metal" - in the sense that it has uses in warfighting), how would Microsoft be affected by the conflict in Syria, either directly or indirectly?

 

Another part of the bad press is the plethora of utilities that put back the semblance of a Start menu - that has been used by critics to bash Microsoft.  However, there are users of Windows 8 that don't use ANY of these third-party utilities - and they don''t have touch support on their PCs, either. I get the Start menu being excised causing consternation - after all, it's been around seventeen years.  Still, applications from the Start menu era are still usable - in their intended manner - despite Windows 8's lack of Start menu.  I have asked the Start menu's defenders to find so much as a SINGLE application - from Microsoft OR a third-party - that utterly relies on the Start menu, and is thus incompatible with Windows 8 or 8.1.  So far, I've had no data, evidence, or anything else from the bashers and critics.  I'm not saying that the issue itself is false; I did predict the issue.  However, because applications from the Start menu era work just fine without it, it does in fact, prove that they are not dependent on it.  And if the applications - desktop applications, mind - aren't dependent on it, and Windows as an OS isn't dependent on it, that means that any dependence is user-specific.  Didn't say it (the user dependence) was either good OR bad - merely that it was there.  However, pointing that out got ME in for a lot of attacks - as though I had pointed out a flaw in them.



#60 PGHammer

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 19:51

Funny, those are the people that Windows 8 was supposedly going to be made for. Remember the "Why we need Windows 8" thread?

 

I've yet to meet anyone who got a new Windows 8 system who didn't hate the Modern UI, most tell me they want Windows 7 on it instead.

LMM, without meaning to, you uncovered a major part of the consternation over Windows 8 from established users - it's UI/UX is not absolutely identical to that of Windows 7.

 

How much has the UI/UX changed merely between 9x/NT4 and Windows 7?  Very little - despite taskbar pinning, the Superbar, etc.

 

The Start menu being gone (and the addition of the StartScreen) is a major change in both UI and UX - the largest since the introduction OF the Start menu.

 

The immediate reaction to a major change is "Put it back the way it was!"  Doesn't matter what the change is in; it doesn't even matter whether the change has greater benefits (examples - changes in the NHS in the UK and the Affordable Care Act, and the changes it is bringing, in the US) - we as societies hate, despise, and LOATHE major change.