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'Fake' service dog & veteran kicked out of restaurant

massachusetts emotional support post-traumatic stress disorder certification paperwork

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#16 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:00

What an ignorant comment.  Since when are service dogs restricted to sight impaired individuals?

No joke. I want a server dog for my diabetes. Type 1's get them because a dog can smell a low sugar level coming on long before a human can feel it or before tests can detect it. Since I have to give myself insulin every time I eat, every time I run the risk of passing out from an accidental overdose. A dog would be needed mostly in a restaurant environment. Thinking service dogs are just for blind people is just showing his ignorance towards the subject.




#17 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:04

Just no need of a dog to eat in a restaurant.

 

He isn't blind.

 

Wow, I considered you a respected member of this forum, but with that one ignorant comment you undermine yourself.  Dogs are used for many forms of support, not only the blind.  Deaf people are assigned dogs, who are trained to gesture in certain ways to certain noises.  People with emotional issues are assigned dogs because they have a specific reaction when the owner becomes anxious that in turn relaxes the owner.

 

Either way, again - not your call is it.  It's the call of the medical professional who's job it is to assign against such needs.  And legally you are not in a position to question this.



#18 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:23

As I said, Maybe i need a special dog to help me deal with being ignorant then.

 

Not until you've been assigned one by someone much more educated on the matter than either you or I.  But at least now you accept their role, so you're growing as a person.  Congratulations :)

 

Lets all take our special dogs everywhere with us, and just be some special happy feeling world.

 

Being happy and having respect for feelings is a bad thing to you?  I suggest you definitely need to talk to someone about this.



#19 +Vykranth

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:29

There are plenty of programs for veterans with PTSD that provide them with dogs to help them cope with basic life.

- The Veterans Service Dog Program http://theveteransse....com/index.html

- Paws for Purple Hearts http://www.pawsforpurplehearts.org/

 

It is not because these dogs are not German shepherds or golden retrievers that they are not as valuable and as helping to these people who suffer greatly.

 

There are answers in this thread so inhumane that want me want to puke. If you want to continue, next time you see a veteran, kick him in the balls, that will be the same thing.



#20 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:34

There are answers in this thread so inhumane that want me want to puke. If you want to continue, next time you see a veteran, kick him in the balls, that will be the same thing.

 

I think it's just ignorant people who don't understand something so they attack it.  And let's be honest, a lot of people refuse to even try to understand mental or emotional issues, because it's seen as a weakness (generally by the weak).



#21 Zidane

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:36

Gotta say Hum, I am shocked. I read all the news threads you make because you make whitty or "right on the mark" remarks.

 

This time, you seriously are way off base. It doesn't matter if I or you or anyone else on this thread feel having the service dog is silly. He was officially granted the service dog to help him cope with PTSD and we are not qualified to question who should and shouldn't have one.

 

Don't like it? Write up a letter to the appropriate organizations and voice your concerns.



#22 Charisma

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:39

"Ignorant" not even being inherently negative here--although I dislike human tendency to attack something they do not understand. Simply not understanding is not bad, though, it's an opportunity to learn. So let's not attack each other here either, let's just discuss and learn :p

 

I have often wondered how the need for service dogs collides with the need to keep animals out of certain places for sanitary/allergy reasons. Not really the same situation but last time I was on a plane (couple of weeks ago) I was sat next to a lady who had a cat with her, in a carrier under the seat. The cat was sedated and sleeping and I actually didn't even know she was there until near the end when we had a rough landing and she woke up. But had I been allergic to cats, this could have been a problem. I guess these things are dealt with on a case-by-case basis.

 

At any rate, the owner didn't have to be rude about this. Perhaps they could have reached some compromise, like letting the dog stay outside and the man sitting at a table near the window where they could see each other. Or the man just going someplace where his business was more appreciated. It's what I would have done.



#23 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:42

I have often wondered how the need for service dogs collides with the need to keep animals out of certain places for sanitary/allergy reasons.

 

Generally dog breeds are chosen that don't shed so as to mitigate the issue.  Eg: Some breeds are cross-bred with poodle genes to remove the shedding.  See, being educated on a matter leads to reasoned debate.  Being blind and acting like jerk leads towards, well, staying blind and acting like a jerk.  The owner = the latter.



#24 Charisma

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:50

Generally dog breeds are chosen that don't shed so as to mitigate the issue.  Eg: Some breeds are cross-bred with poodle genes to remove the shedding.  See, being educated on a matter leads to reasoned debate.  Being blind and acting like jerk leads towards, well, staying blind and acting like a jerk.  The owner = the latter.

Aha, see, that makes sense. Hypoallergenic dogs :)

 

Also, service dogs often have a little "jacket" on that asks people not to pet the dog or engage him/her, because the dog is working and needs to focus on other things. I'm sure it wouldn't have been a problem for anyone else in the restaurant, the owner should have seriously chilled out. It's basically discrimination at that point.



#25 tytytucke

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:51

NO Dogs Allowed.

 

Some people just don't like animals and eating around them.

They can find them disgusting and everyone needs to be taken into consideration. 

especially the majority of the people in the restaurant over the guy who brought the dog.

A dog is a dog no matter how well bread, dressed and trained it is.



#26 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:58

I have a friend who's job it is to train service-dogs.  She has to take them EVERYWHERE - literally (watching a dog and a penguin eye each other up and realise they couldn't be bothered was awesome). 

The absolutely retarded crap she gets from people is astounding.  It's jacket says "In training" and yet people walk up and tell her she's not blind and doesn't need a dog.  She attempts to explain and is met with absolutely ignorant nonsense about germs, hair and fleas (the dogs are kept astoundingly clean and don't shed).  People grasp at straws to find reasons to be so negative about something so positive.  Some people are so full of hate, fear and ignorance that it just makes a mockery of being a human.  She has leaflets that explain (sad that these are even necessary because so many times this issue comes up) but they refuse to even look at them - so set into their argument of "It's just a joke".  Such sad, lonely, insecure people :(

 

One day they will need support of some form, that another person may not understand.  Hopefully our support networks will still be in place to help.  Maybe then they will realise...



#27 Raze

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 15:58

Generally dog breeds are chosen that don't shed so as to mitigate the issue.  Eg: Some breeds are cross-bred with poodle genes to remove the shedding.  See, being educated on a matter leads to reasoned debate.  Being blind and acting like jerk leads towards, well, staying blind and acting like a jerk.  The owner = the latter.

 

 

Shedding hair is not the issue, it is the release of dander, saliva or urine that set off allergies. Also a person with asthma can suffer a severe attack, even life threatening.  A balance of can be very difficult to achieve, as brought up by Charisma.



#28 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:01

NO Dogs Allowed.

 

Always comes with the caveat though - legally unless it's a private residence.  Try again.

 

Some people just don't like animals and eating around them.

 

I don't like being around kids.  I mean, they cry and crap their pants.  Let's ban them from restaurants shall we?  And old people, don't they smell of wee, spit and crap their pants too?  How about Asians?  Blacks? Gays? Jews?  I can invent a whole bunch of BS reasons to "DISLIKE" something.  Whereas there is a diagnosed reason that this man NEEDED his legally and professionally assigned dog.

 

especially the majority of the people in the restaurant over the guy who brought the dog.

 

Oh sorry, I missed the part where they took a head count and presented this as a pie chart of how many people cared/didn't care.  Please quote it so I don't miss it again!?



#29 Denis W.

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:04

^ It seems to me, that if you have emotional difficulties, you would avoid going out in public.

 

Flat out disagree with this. As someone who has suffered from anxiety problems recently (and still do) the last thing you would want to do is keep yourself shut in at home or keep yourself stuck in whatever small comfort zone you're in. That only validates the reason for the anxiety to exist and does not give you the opportunity to fight your fears. If this man needs a service dog to help him cope, he 100% should have it.



#30 +Nik L

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 16:04

Shedding hair is not the issue, it is the release of dander, saliva or urine that set off allergies.

 

This issue does get raised.  And once again, these dogs are well trained not to pee in public places.  They are not slobbering hounds.  Believe it or not, such things ARE taken into account by the agencies that train and select the dogs.

 

Also a person with asthma can suffer a severe attack, even life threatening.

 

And a person with a nut allergy can die from a bag of peanuts being opened in the same room.  Do we ban peanuts?