Jump to content



Photo

Did cisco rip me off?


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#1 capr

capr

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 01-July 05

Posted 29 August 2013 - 16:54

I have the E4200 On the router's website they clearly advertise 4xGigabit Ethernet ports. Today I found out that this is crap.... (could it be that the internet plugin port isn't gigabit but the other ports are?)

 

I am on a Gigabit internet line. the technician's laptop got much higher speeds than my computer is getting with and without the router (his numbers were in the 700s with a macbook pro). But that's another story. Think my mobo manufacturer also ripped me off?

 

 

Without the router 

2932013334.png

 

With the Router

 

 

2932028220.png




#2 ChuckFinley

ChuckFinley

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 14-May 03

Posted 29 August 2013 - 16:56

Well if the techs laptop was getting much faster laptop with the equipment they installed and provided to you. Logic dictates its your equipment i.e Laptop!



#3 tsupersonic

tsupersonic

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 30-September 06
  • Location: New York
  • OS: Win. 8.1 Pro. x64
  • Phone: Nexus 5 16 GB

Posted 29 August 2013 - 16:58

Are your networking settings in the OS setup properly? I'd check that first. If the technician got good speeds with and without the router, then it's your computer, and not the router...



#4 TheExperiment

TheExperiment

    Starry

  • Joined: 11-October 03
  • Location: Elsewhere
  • OS: 8.1 x64

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:04

I have the E4200 On the router's website they clearly advertise 4xGigabit Ethernet ports. Today I found out that this is crap.... (could it be that the internet plugin port isn't gigabit but the other ports are?)

Wouldn't it make more sense to ask the manufacturer?  Most people aren't going to have your exact equipment to test with.

 

Note that it advertises a gigabit switch not gigabit routing, so no...you got what you paid for.



#5 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 21
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:07

Well they advertise 4xGigabit Ethernet ports.  4x = 4, ie. 4 lan ports.  They do not advertise what the internet port is, but what I have seen looks also to possibly be Gigabit Ethernet.  If the tech was able to produce similar speeds on both the modem and the router, then the issue is your computer not the router (could be drivers or firmware..could be that you need to replace the nic). 



#6 grunger106

grunger106

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 02-August 03
  • Location: London

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:09

That router has 4x Gb/E ports on the switch and a single Gb/E port for the WAN

 

Looking at the speed I'd say you had the WAN port fixed at 100Mbit

 

Also - that might have Cisco written on it, but that's not a Cisco in my book... That's a Linksys.



#7 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 21
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:10

That router has 4x Gb/E ports on the switch and a single Gb/E port for the WAN

 

Looking at the speed I'd say you had the WAN port fixed at 100Mbit

 

Also - that might have Cisco written on it, but that's not a Cisco in my book... That's a Linksys.

Belkin bought linksys...it isn't cisco anymore. 

http://www.engadget....quires-linksys/



#8 francescob

francescob

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 04-November 08

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:12

Just because the ports are gigabit it doesn't mean the router can actually ROUTE at a gigabit speed. Buy a switch instead or set the router to not act as a gateway, if it allows you to.



#9 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 21
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:14

Just because the ports are gigabit it doesn't mean the router can actually ROUTE at a gigabit speed. Buy a switch instead or set the router to not act as a gateway, if it allows you to.

huh?   the business answer would be to buy a firewall to be able to route to the internet at speed.  buying a switch would only support the internal network, and on a home network you wouldn't be routing on your local lan other than out to the internet.  You would need a very expensive switch to be able to route to the internet and provide firewall capabilities such as nat, not something that you would go to a brick and mortar store to buy and certainly not something a home user would be able to configure.

 

please understand the difference between firewall, router, and switch before making a recommendation of such equipment (in simple terms, it is best to not confuse people more than they already are).



#10 grunger106

grunger106

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 02-August 03
  • Location: London

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:16

Belkin bought linksys...it isn't cisco anymore. 

http://www.engadget....quires-linksys/

Indeed they did - but this particular model was a Linksys developed unit as I recall.

 

However proper Cisco gear is a different matter - this is a Cisco router ;) (Although admittedly an older one now)

 

cisco-1841.jpg

 

 

There is clearly something wrong with something at the OPs place - I wonder if the WAN port has had it's speed fixed, that said I very much doubt you'll get much more than 150- 200Mbp/s through a cheap consumer router regardless of port speeds as it just won't have the grunt.

 

The one pure 1Gb leased line I've configured here in the UK required a £2200 router (or more correctly in this case a firewall - Zyxel's USG 2000) to get anywhere near that, and even that tops out at 750Mbp/s IMIX
 



#11 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 21
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:21

Yes it is, and they are rock solid compared to their linksys counterparts.



#12 Top Qat

Top Qat

    Neowinian

  • Tech Issues Solved: 5
  • Joined: 09-July 04
  • Location: London, UK
  • OS: Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy S 3

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:25

Linksys E4200 is capable of routing at higher than 100Mb/s speed.

 

Check out this http://www.smallnetb...howall=&start=2

 

Looks to me like the Ethernet port auto negotiation is setting 100Mb instead of 1000Mb.

Did you check for more up-to-date network drivers?



#13 grunger106

grunger106

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 02-August 03
  • Location: London

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:29

Yes it is, and they are rock solid compared to their linksys counterparts.

Damn right - got an Cisco 861 ISR for my home router (overkill - but rock solid, highly flexible) and a load of 1841s on sites I manage.

 

(As an aside - you can pickup 1841's with WICs for under £100 on ebay now - bargain!)



#14 Mando

Mando

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 05-April 02
  • Location: Scotland, Dundee
  • OS: Win 7 Ultimate x64/Pro x64/Home prem x64
  • Phone: Samsung Note ICS

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:36

grunger106, on 29 Aug 2013 - 18:16, said:

Indeed they did - but this particular model was a Linksys developed unit as I recall.

 

However proper Cisco gear is a different matter - this is a Cisco router ;) (Although admittedly an older one now)

 

cisco-1841.jpg

 

 

There is clearly something wrong with something at the OPs place - I wonder if the WAN port has had it's speed fixed, that said I very much doubt you'll get much more than 150- 200Mbp/s through a cheap consumer router regardless of port speeds as it just won't have the grunt.

 

The one pure 1Gb leased line I've configured here in the UK required a £2200 router (or more correctly in this case a firewall - Zyxel's USG 2000) to get anywhere near that, and even that tops out at 750Mbp/s IMIX
 

man not seen that model in a while :) spend most of my days configging 1921s now.



#15 francescob

francescob

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 04-November 08

Posted 29 August 2013 - 17:36

huh?   the business answer would be to buy a firewall to be able to route to the internet at speed.  buying a switch would only support the internal network, and on a home network you wouldn't be routing on your local lan other than out to the internet.  You would need a very expensive switch to be able to route to the internet and provide firewall capabilities such as nat, not something that you would go to a brick and mortar store to buy and certainly not something a home user would be able to configure.

 

please understand the difference between firewall, router, and switch before making a recommendation of such equipment (in simple terms, it is best to not confuse people more than they already are).

 

Who said his modem isn't perfectly capable of routing without an additional router? Most SOHO solutions do. Switch + Modem = everything connects through the modem, it's not like he uses PPPoE or other old protocols to connect.





Click here to login or here to register to remove this ad, it's free!