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Job site Glassdoor.com provided Bloomberg Businessweek with employee reviews from their site for the 30 largest fast food chains. While protest organizers say workers are walking out of McDonald?s, Burger King, Wendy?s, and KFC, these employers actually received better reviews than other restaurants, according to Glassdoor. In their comments, employees cited complaints ranging from pay, to work atmosphere and management, to the customers.

 

For context, the average rating on Glassdoor.com is 3.2. What does that mean? A 1 rating means ?dissatisfied? and a 3 rating is considered ?okay.? According to Glassdoor spokesman Scott Dobroski, anything between 2.5 and 3.0 means employees are moderately satisfied and the company is still technically in ?okay? territory, but they?re teetering on dissatisfied. If a company receives a 3.6 or 3.7, employees are sufficiently satisfied.

 

Overall, many of the 30 largest chains posted average scores. The two largest fast food chains, Subway and McDonald?s, both had a 3.1. There are even a few companies where workers seem chipper. In-N-Out Burger, for instance, got a 4.1 rating. Chick-fil-A scored 3.7 and Starbucks had a 3.6.

 

That said, here are the lowest scoring fast food restaurants.

 

Carl?s Jr.
Rating: 2.5
Employee comment: ?Long grueling hours for little pay, angry and demanding customers, unreasonable expectations, lots of shift changes, unmotivated coworkers and not very supportive management.?

Little Caesar?s
Rating: 2.7
Employee comment: ?Low pay, no hours, little Caesar pay card deducts money every swipe.?

Jack in the Box
Rating: 2.8
Employee comment: ?Very stressful and very busy during lunch. Under staff[ed] at some shifts. Graveyard can be annoying because it is only the Shift Leader and cook. Rude Customers.?

Hardee?s
Rating: 2.8
Employee comment: ?Stoned coworkers?and managers. Actually, this didn?t matter. In fact, it made some of them much easier to deal with? Everything is covered in a layer of grime and grease, and always working around a hot broiler. A lot of yelling to move faster, and to always be doing something even when there is truly nothing to be done.?

 

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The problem is that these employees aren't expressing themselves. They're not wearing enough pieces of flair. A minimum 37 pieces of flair is required.

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I like the hardees comment: ?Stoned coworkers?and managers. Actually, this didn?t matter. In fact, it made some of them much easier to deal with? Everything is covered in a layer of grime and grease, and always working around a hot broiler. A lot of yelling to move faster, and to always be doing something even when there is truly nothing to be done.?

 

Sounds to me like there is something to be done :P

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When there is 'nothing to be done', you send employees home. :laugh:

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I know a guy who works at Hardees on the weekends. From what he says I would never eat their again.

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I know a guy who works at Hardees on the weekends. From what he says I would never eat their again.

Works that way for any fast food joint.

 

I used to work at Pizza Hut.  The myth of workers spitting in your food if you ###### them off...isn't a myth.

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I know a guy who works at Hardees on the weekends. From what he says I would never eat their again.

Our local Hardee's is kept fairly clean --and employes get a daily free meal, as long as the restaurant passes the monthly inspection.

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That is so interesting news! I will not work at any fast food places!

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I have worked for fast food before... not too bad, but not something that I would really want to do again. I can understand the comments that are being made, and can relate them to my current job as well (not fast food)

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http://detnews.com/opinion/article?a=2013309020006&f=1218

Will robots replace fast food workers?

On Aug. 29th, labor-backed walkouts targeted fast food outlets in over a dozen major American cities from coast to coast, including Detroit. They were demanding a more-than-100 percent increase in the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

The protestors target their rhetoric at restaurant management. But this isn't accurate. In reality, the employees on the picket lines are fighting a war with price-conscious customers. If they get their way with a $15 minimum wage, they will only hasten the service industry's move toward automation and self-service, where the customer (or even a computer) performs a task that used to be part of an employee's job description.

The labor-aligned protesters are butting up against some basic economic realities of the service industry. Fast-food restaurants, along with other labor-intensive businesses such as grocery stores, gas stations, and retail outlets, keep just a few cents in profit from each sales dollar after paying for food, labor and other expenses. In other words, a $15 wage mandate -- which would add over $15,000 a year to the cost of each full-time minimum-wage employee -- can't just be absorbed.

This leaves employers with one of two unpleasant options: Raise prices, or reduce costs. But higher prices to offset a wage hike of this magnitude aren't realistic -- imagine how you'd respond if the 99-cent menu became the $2.99 menu. Instead, restaurant operators have to provide the same service with fewer employees.

This means that customers end up serving themselves instead of being served by an employee. For example: Today, we might bag our own groceries at a supermarket checkout or pump our own gas at the station (except in New Jersey and Oregon, where it's against the law). Even self-service soda refills at fast-food restaurants were developed as a labor-saving device.

In other cases, a robot can be "hired" to do the job instead of an employee. The technology is already here. San Francisco-based Momentum Machines recently announced a new robotic burger-flipper that does the work equivalent of three full-time kitchen employees. That's 360 burgers per hour, with no strikes, benefits or wage demands.

At current labor costs, Momentum's burger-flipper pays for itself within the first year. But at $15 an hour for an employee, the investment would pay off in a matter of months.

This trend toward automation doesn't just affect the kitchen. In 2011, McDonald's announced it was installing touch-screen ordering terminals at 7,000 European locations, where the minimum wage is higher -- making the cashier position effectively obsolete. California Pizza Kitchen, Chevys Fresh Mex and other table-service chains are experimenting with computer terminals that let customers order and pay at the table, with minimal service from a server required.

These changes don't become inevitable until the cost of service gets trumped by customers' desire for low prices. But once the jobs are automated, that's one less entry-level position for a less-skilled employee to work his or her way up the career ladder -- no small concern given that teen unemployment has been above 20 percent for the past five years.

Those teens, along with other entry-level employees, will be the first to feel the unintended consequences of a $15 minimum wage. However well-meaning the striking employees in Detroit and elsewhere are, the fact is that they're only fighting the laws of economics -- and that's a fight they can't win.

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to be honest id rather have a robot cook my food and serve it to me, that way i wont have to worry about spit or thing else weird getting in my burger.  Ive worked fast food places before, I think it should be a right of passage into the job market lol. Give you a little motivation to better yourself and get out of those hell holes, that being said flipping burgers is one of the easiest jobs on the planet but the  pay sucks. I'd never work at a fast food place again.

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