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Erin Milligan has to surrender her cell phone to school officials before going back to college this year.

Milligan isn?t being punished for violating any rules. She?s just following Wyoming Catholic College?s technology policy, which bans cell phones at the small liberal arts school.

And even more surprising, as someone who grew up in a generation that has never known a world without the Internet, Milligan says she likes it.

?It?s a release, really, not having a cell phone,? said Milligan, a 20-year-old junior from New Hampshire. ?When you are no longer captivated by technology, you find your true and real self.?

Also banned at Milligan?s school are televisions and access to most websites in dorm rooms. Administrators allow only limited Internet connectivity throughout the campus, so students can do online research.

Before the start of each school year, Milligan and her 111 classmates at the college relinquish the devices most of their peers elsewhere use to stay constantly connected to friends, family and classmates. Student leaders lock the phones in a box in each dorm room.

Students can check them out for emergencies or if they leave campus for travel.

?We are so tech savvy these days,? Milligan said. ?But something that is really prevalent is our inability to genuinely communicate at a human-to-human, face-to-face level.?

 

?We?ve all have the experience where you are talking to someone and their phone goes off, or their text goes off, and they stop talking to you and begin talking someone who is not there,? Tonkowich said. ?I?m worried about that direction in our society, where people you aren?t with are more important than the people you are with.?

Milligan said the students actually appreciate the freedom of being disconnected and become accustomed to the unusual policy after a few weeks at the school.

?We realize that spending too much time on a computer prohibits us from doing something that we should be doing or something that is fun,? the college sophomore said. ?I don?t want to be someone who is just texting friends and not talking to them, and have a Facebook profile to define who I am.?

 

?Technology is a mask and can be a deception in this world," said Milligan, who is studying to become a teacher but is also considering a life with the church. ?I don?t think I will be behind other people, because I will be developing something that will be dying ? the ability to communicate.?

 

The penalty for violating the technology policy is performing community service.

 

?We don?t see this as thumbing our nose at tech and modern culture,? Tonkowich said. ?We?re allowing a freedom and a vacation from all that so that students can work on something different: true friendship, true virtue, true study.

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I assume they have at least telephones in the rooms and such where they can be reached in case of emergencies...

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I assume they have at least telephones in the rooms and such where they can be reached in case of emergencies...

Always thinking about how to take care of people.. :) We shall call her, Mother Charisma 

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It?s a release, really, not having a cell phone,? said Milligan, a 20-year-old junior from New Hampshire. ?When you are no longer captivated by technology, you find your true and real self.?

 

At least a couple times a year, I will go hiking/camping for a couple weeks and leave all tech behind, or turned off and only turned on for an emergency.  I like to unplug once in a while and actually see the world around me.

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At least a couple times a year, I will go hiking/camping for a couple weeks and leave all tech behind, or turned off and only turned on for an emergency.  I like to unplug once in a while and actually see the world around me.

I definitely believe in putting away the phones often and actually learning to communicate with people. We have a whole generation growing up who don't learn the art of being comfortable talking to people face-to-face, recognising facial cues and body language, and realising there are consequences to certain behaviours and things that are said. Being forced to acknowledge that people (even someone you only know via text) is a real, flesh-and-blood human is a very good thing.

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?It?s a release, really, not having a cell phone,? said Milligan, a 20-year-old junior from New Hampshire. ?When you are no longer captivated by technology, you find your true and real self.?

 

That's the biggest line of BS that I've ever heard in my life. 

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I definitely believe in putting away the phones often and actually learning to communicate with people. We have a whole generation growing up who don't learn the art of being comfortable talking to people face-to-face, recognising facial cues and body language, and realising there are consequences to certain behaviours and things that are said. Being forced to acknowledge that people (even someone you only know via text) is a real, flesh-and-blood human is a very good thing.

(Y)

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That's the biggest line of BS that I've ever heard in my life. 

 

I am not sure about finding your real self...but it is a release, and a stress reliever, not having to be tied to a piece of equipment.

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what if your "true and real self" is a technologist?....

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I assume they have at least telephones in the rooms and such where they can be reached in case of emergencies...

 

I'm assuming they have pay phones that are now making them lots of money.

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I definitely believe in putting away the phones often and actually learning to communicate with people. We have a whole generation growing up who don't learn the art of being comfortable talking to people face-to-face, recognising facial cues and body language, and realising there are consequences to certain behaviours and things that are said. Being forced to acknowledge that people (even someone you only know via text) is a real, flesh-and-blood human is a very good thing.

Wait... are you telling me you're a real person?! JUST LIKE ME?? :O Wait till I tell my friends on Facebook about this!

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How will they arrange dirty nasty sex ?

 

No texting !

 

My god -- they'll have to actually talk to another human being.

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That's the biggest line of BS that I've ever heard in my life. 

 

why? :huh:

 

Anyway, I recommend all of the present to read Walden, by Henry David Thouraeu.

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why? :huh:

 

It sounds like something out of their college brochure. Technology is just a tool, and you don't need to drop a hammer to find yourself. You just have to use it properly, for what it was intended for. People who are addicted to their cell phones are addicts just like any other addict. Put the blame were it belongs. 

 

I guess it might be a because I'm a wee bit older, but I am not tied to my phone, or to any piece of tech. In fact, I turn my phone off at night same as my computer. I walk in the park every day, sometimes with my phone listening to music, but many times not. Sometimes I walk with other people and talk with them. But I do keep my phone close by in case I do need to use it for what it was intended for.

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I guess it might be a because I'm a wee bit older, but I am not tied to my phone

 

This is the key. We're part of the last generation not raised by hyper communication. For us is easier.

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I assume they have at least telephones in the rooms and such where they can be reached in case of emergencies...

why would they need telephones for that, they just pray to the guy in the sky that everything will be would itself out

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I guess it might be a because I'm a wee bit older, but I am not tied to my phone, or to any piece of tech. In fact, I turn my phone off at night same as my computer. I walk in the park every day, sometimes with my phone listening to music, but many times not. Sometimes I walk with other people and talk with them. But I do keep my phone close by in case I do need to use it for what it was intended for.

Oh really ... :shifty:

 

All my important friends and family have my personal cellphone number. They can get me any time day or night if they need me.

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what if your "true and real self" is a technologist?....

Then you will figure that out when its taken away from you. Most people assume they are something for no other reason than because they never knew anything else. This would force the issue.

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I don't care about cellphones..  I am not addicted to the phones...  I can live without it if I want to cut off the phone. 

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^ I feel that way many times.  My cell phone is often more of an annoyance than a help.

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why would they need telephones for that, they just pray to the guy in the sky that everything will be would itself out

One of the dumber things I have read all day. Are you implying that having a cellphone is the only logical option? If so, you are more closed minded than the people you seem to be trying to make fun of.

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Hum, on 05 Sept 2013 - 08:56, said:

Erin Milligan has to surrender her cell phone to school officials before going back to college this year.

Milligan isn?t being punished for violating any rules. She?s just following Wyoming Catholic College?s technology policy, which bans cell phones at the small liberal arts school.

And even more surprising, as someone who grew up in a generation that has never known a world without the Internet, Milligan says she likes it.

?It?s a release, really, not having a cell phone,? said Milligan, a 20-year-old junior from New Hampshire. ?When you are no longer captivated by technology, you find your true and real self.?

Also banned at Milligan?s school are televisions and access to most websites in dorm rooms. Administrators allow only limited Internet connectivity throughout the campus, so students can do online research.

Before the start of each school year, Milligan and her 111 classmates at the college relinquish the devices most of their peers elsewhere use to stay constantly connected to friends, family and classmates. Student leaders lock the phones in a box in each dorm room.

Students can check them out for emergencies or if they leave campus for travel.

?We are so tech savvy these days,? Milligan said. ?But something that is really prevalent is our inability to genuinely communicate at a human-to-human, face-to-face level.?

 

?We?ve all have the experience where you are talking to someone and their phone goes off, or their text goes off, and they stop talking to you and begin talking someone who is not there,? Tonkowich said. ?I?m worried about that direction in our society, where people you aren?t with are more important than the people you are with.?

Milligan said the students actually appreciate the freedom of being disconnected and become accustomed to the unusual policy after a few weeks at the school.

?We realize that spending too much time on a computer prohibits us from doing something that we should be doing or something that is fun,? the college sophomore said. ?I don?t want to be someone who is just texting friends and not talking to them, and have a Facebook profile to define who I am.?

 

?Technology is a mask and can be a deception in this world," said Milligan, who is studying to become a teacher but is also considering a life with the church. ?I don?t think I will be behind other people, because I will be developing something that will be dying ? the ability to communicate.?

 

The penalty for violating the technology policy is performing community service.

 

?We don?t see this as thumbing our nose at tech and modern culture,? Tonkowich said. ?We?re allowing a freedom and a vacation from all that so that students can work on something different: true friendship, true virtue, true study.

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Wow this one of the biggest load of crap I have read in a long time! Is this coming from the same group that doesn't mind being probed and groped by the TSA as long as it makes others feel safe?

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Oh really ... :shifty:

They know to call my wife at night. Or our house phone. Or my phone if I forget to cut it off, like I do sometimes. It sucks getting old. :D

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They know to call my wife at night. Or our house phone. Or my phone if I forget to cut it off, like I do sometimes. It sucks getting old. :D

 

Sure sure... lol

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Truth will set u free

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