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How Much Power Does a 600W PSU Use?

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#16 +Phouchg

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 18:20

I'm currently using 82W on a 1200W PSU and the efficiency rating is 91%.

 

I suppose it's because Titans actually *provide* power rather than consume it :p




#17 Enron

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 20:06

I suppose it's because Titans actually *provide* power rather than consume it :p

 

Yes, but if I put both Titans on IRQ5, then we have a Clash of the Titans.



#18 +Phouchg

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 20:39

Yes, but if I put both Titans on IRQ5, then we have a Clash of the Titans.

 

Do your Titans also work as line printers? O the wonders shall never cease! :woot:



#19 ShadowMajestic

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:57

Depends on the PSU. If you look at the 80+ certifications, they all are supposed to be most efficient at 50% usage. You'd have to do a lot of testing to figure out what efficiency they actually get at each level of usage. 

 

However, if you need 500 Watts, a 1000-Watt which is anything above base 80+ would be 3% more efficient than a 500 Watt. So, not much. And it's possible a 600 running at 83% load could be just as efficient.

 

Long story short, buy a good PSU, give yourself some overhead.

Ah thanks, I was under the impression most ran most efficient at 80-90%. At least those I've owned do :)



#20 +zhiVago

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 11:21

When in doubt, Just get a 1000 Watt and be done with it :D

 

And at full load, this would be equal to exactly one kilowatt-hour! 

 

So, if you look at your electricity bill, it should give you the rate and from there it'll be possible to estimate how much a PC actually costs to run.



#21 vetthe evn show

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 20:10

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