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NSA cracked most on-line encryption

usa britain encryption technology internet users propublica code-breaking documents leaked

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#31 +Zag L.

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:29

<<< waits for the "if you've nothing to hide you've nothing to fear" crowd

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

Why wait? We have heard it plenty. How about wait for something like why that sentiment is not correct? Nothing I do online is illegal so why do I care that they are wasting their time reading my email, facebook, etc. Nobody has every given a legitimate response without resorting to slippery slope logic.

 

I do not/have not conducted illegal activity online and I while I have nothing to fear, I have plenty to be outraged about. Its called a reasonable expectation of privacy and we are all losing more and more of it. Maybe you do not care that your personal affairs are becoming less and less 'personal'. For me, this latest revelation is just another way to remove my ability to NOT be seen/monitored unless I choose to be.  Do I fear the NSA is clearing out my bank account, of course not. What I do consider troublesome however is if there is some other guy like Snowden that isn't as honest (wow, that was hard to actually say since I'm not sure if I'd rather him go to jail or give him a hero's parade) that now has the ability to pick and choose to see whatever they want and the money involved in selling identities can be a big motivator to become dishonest. I'm not saying this has happened, just that it can. 

 

I shred all my documents so that no one can easily get them - and I mean anyone. Now we find out there are plenty of people whose intentions we assume are just have access to that data, encrypted or otherwise and that make me uncomfortable.

 

Bottom line, if I came up with an algorithm to to crack 256 bit AES encryption and used that to break your secure communications without your permission (or even knowledge of), you'd want me arrested.  Not because you are doing anything wrong but because I did something wrong.  That is what the NSA is doing here. Breaking my encrypted secure communications without my consent or a warrant is just plain wrong.  




#32 LaP

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:31

The TSA no fly lists are one such area where this is shown to affect everyday Americans, even young children.

 

Got to stop those 6 years old terrorists i guess ...

 

:huh:



#33 KingCracker

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:31

I mean really it doesn't matter if they're not looking at mine, they could be looking at some elses bank account illegally and to think that these people are so ethical that they would  want to pry into someones personal finances is complete bullcrap. 



#34 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:32

I do not/have not conducted illegal activity online and I while I have nothing to fear, I have plenty to be outraged about. Its called a reasonable expectation of privacy and we are all losing more and more of it.

You can't lose something you never had. This is the problem with the majority of people. They actually think that if they do something in public, they still have the right to privacy. When you send it over the internet, OVER PUBLIC LINES OF COMMUNICATION, you have lost that right to privacy regarding that.



#35 KingCracker

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:34

You can't lose something you never had. This is the problem with the majority of people. They actually think that if they do something in public, they still have the right to privacy. When you send it over the internet, OVER PUBLIC LINES OF COMMUNICATION, you have lost that right to privacy regarding that.

When you have a bank account or something similar that is not public information. You do not have the right to see it. So yes there is places on the internet that demand privacy. 



#36 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:35

Got to stop those 6 years old terrorists i guess ...

 

:huh:

Or 90 year old grandmas. Those are the ones you really have to watch out for.



#37 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:36

When you have a bank account or something similar that is not public information. You do not have the right to see it. So yes there is places on the internet that demand privacy. 

That information is not private at all. How do you think the IRS can see that without every asking you? I get my tax return directly deposited into my bank account and I have never given them that account.



#38 AJerman

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:36

Right back to insults. Reported. You can't talk without insulting people and I am the child. Right.

You reported someone because they called you a child? :laugh:



#39 KingCracker

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:37

Or 90 year old grandmas. Those are the ones you really have to watch out for.

Don't you know that those that hold power abuse power? Same applies with the NSA sure their goal is to catch terrorists but you don't know what they are doing. 



#40 +LogicalApex

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:37

You can't lose something you never had. This is the problem with the majority of people. They actually think that if they do something in public, they still have the right to privacy. When you send it over the internet, OVER PUBLIC LINES OF COMMUNICATION, you have lost that right to privacy regarding that.

What you're saying has no basis in law. SCOTUS has recognized the right to privacy that exists while in a public space... The classic case is the requirement that the police obtain a warrant to bug a public pay telephone. Even though the phone is in public and you approach it openly you still expect to be in private while communicating on that device. Much like encryption...

 

So, no everything you do in public isn't fair game for the police.



#41 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:38

What you're saying has no basis in law. SCOTUS has recognized the right to privacy that exists while in a public space... The classic case is the requirement that the police obtain a warrant to bug a public pay telephone. Even though the phone is in public and you approach it openly you still expect to be in private while communicating on that device. Much like encryption...

 

So, no everything you do in public isn't fair game for the police.

We are not talking about the police. We are talking about the government, which has its own rules.



#42 KingCracker

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:38

That information is not private at all. How do you think the IRS can see that without every asking you? I get my tax return directly deposited into my bank account and I have never given them that account.

You have to give the IRS that information first. You have to manually input your banking information. The IRS just doesn't put it in. If it was public the IRS would just look your name up and do it automatically. 



#43 LaP

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:39

 

 

Bottom line, if I came up with an algorithm to to crack 256 bit AES encryption and used that to break your secure communications without your permission (or even knowledge of), you'd want me arrested.  Not because you are doing anything wrong but because I did something wrong.  That is what the NSA is doing here. Breaking my encrypted secure communications without my consent or a warrant is just plain wrong.  

 

^ +1000



#44 +LogicalApex

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:39

We are not talking about the police. We are talking about the government, which has its own rules.

:huh: What? I'm not even sure what to make of this...



#45 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 16:39

You reported someone because they called you a child? :laugh:

Reread what was said. There is more than just that.