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is 64-bit is give more battery life  and Android more stable ? .. no ? ... useless....

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is 64-bit is give more battery life  and Android more stable ? .. no ? ... useless....

On a day to day usage, you probably won't notice.

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Where's the announcement for their fingerprint scanner?  The GS5 will undoubtedly have it along with an 8-core CPU...

 

Yes, because using biometric identification is such a revolutionary concept!

 

Worse, it will actually be a detriment!

 

You only need a 64bit processor if you're going to be addressing more than 4gb of RAM. No phone has that much RAM, and won't for a couple of years yet, if then.

 

Also, currently all mobile apps are 32bit apps. That means they're going to have to either be recompiled, or run via some kind of emulation layer (like the WoW64 library in Windows) to run, and that's going to be slower than running them on a 32bit processor.

 

Not true for Android, Android applications are compiled as java bytecode rather than machine code, and as such as long as they are parsed by a 64 bit VM no emulation will be necessary, in fact they will probably continue to work without even needing to be recompiled.

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What if the fingerprint works so that the users can set a 7 character passcode, but the fingerprint automatically enters the passcode ? and wouldn't the user be able to choose whether he wants to use a non compliant finger print, or to use a 7 character passcode and be compliant ? 

 

Then again, what are you allowing them to do with their phones that require 7 character passcode to be allowed in on your enterprise ? must be more than the fear of their phonebooks being stolen... If I had to use a 7 digit passcode to unlock my phone, I would demand a plain old dumb phone as my work phone and just use my smart phone disconnected form the company network. 

 

We are a fortune 100 company and consider something like a fingerprint to be too easy to unlock a device.  Until apple opens the api and allows for greater customization...not going to happen and we won't allow it.

 

How is a passcode considered safer than a fingerprint scanner?  ( Serious question, not trolling)

 

We enforced passcodes to change every 90 days.  Cannot do that with a fingerprint.  Passcodes work 100% of the time (pending user compliance).  Look at apples press statement on the limitations on the scanner: http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2013/09/11/apple-new-iphone-not-storing-fingerprints-doesnt-like-sweat/

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We are a fortune 100 company 

Were can I send my CV :D

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Yes, because using biometric identification is such a revolutionary concept!

Umm... who is saying that it is?

Enough with the irrational assumptions, please...

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We are a fortune 100 company and consider something like a fingerprint to be too easy to unlock a device.  Until apple opens the api and allows for greater customization...not going to happen and we won't allow it.

 

 

We enforced passcodes to change every 90 days.  Cannot do that with a fingerprint.  Passcodes work 100% of the time (pending user compliance).  Look at apples press statement on the limitations on the scanner: http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2013/09/11/apple-new-iphone-not-storing-fingerprints-doesnt-like-sweat/

 

So not only do your users need to enter a 7 character passcode every time they unlock their phone(several times an hour, imagine the time sucked up to do this) but they need to remember a new passcode ever 3 months... Despite the fact it's proven that changing passcodes at time intervals doesn't increase security, but in fact reduces security at worst and at best has no impact. 

 

And if Apple has a proper finger print reader that isn't fooled by "fake" fingers, but requires "live" fingers. it's more secure than any 56 digit passcode you could enforce on them. Seems like your security policies are made by either inept security engineers, or non it/non security people. 

 

even if you are a fortune 100 company, people aren't storing state secrets on the phone that requires such security on them. I would suspect very few of your users chose to connect their phones to the company network with these requirements. 

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So not only do your users need to enter a 7 character passcode every time they unlock their phone(several times an hour, imagine the time sucked up to do this) but they need to remember a new passcode ever 3 months... Despite the fact it's proven that changing passcodes at time intervals doesn't increase security, but in fact reduces security at worst and at best has no impact. 

 

And if Apple has a proper finger print reader that isn't fooled by "fake" fingers, but requires "live" fingers. it's more secure than any 56 digit passcode you could enforce on them. Seems like your security policies are made by either inept security engineers, or non it/non security people. 

 

even if you are a fortune 100 company, people aren't storing state secrets on the phone that requires such security on them. I would suspect very few of your users chose to connect their phones to the company network with these requirements. 

Your posts are always entertaining to read, you go into so much detail :)  (Sometimes kinda trollish though ). Out of curiosity, what sort of security do you use on your phone?  

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Umm... who is saying that it is?

Enough with the irrational assumptions, please...

 

Well knowing your history it seems you were implying it as some great Apple innovation that Samsung will be rushing to copy.

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Well knowing your history it seems you were implying it as some great Apple innovation that Samsung will be rushing to copy.

Sorry, but no.  Those are your assumptions...  Don't try to make words appear that aren't there...

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Your posts are always entertaining to read, you go into so much detail :)  (Sometimes kinda trollish though ). Out of curiosity, what sort of security do you use on your phone?  

 

On my phone, since it's my personal phone and I don't keep anything secret on it I don't use any security. I Tried but it annoyed me that if I chose a ecurity system on android I lose the lock screen with handy information, like how many calls, messages and mails I have. 

 

Well actually the IT dept of the company I work for has this silly requirement that the be allowed to remote wipe my phone in order for me to get my mail on it, which is kinda funny. But those guys are all kinda messed up, they switched from our well working terminal server system to the horrible citrix solution which even when it actually works keep not allowing us to connect because it can't properly disconnect your sessions and is much slower with lower quality. why did they switch ? because the office rats in admin thought it was cool that they could make remote desktop apps look like they where running natively on your desktop :facepalm:

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Uhh... this isn't news. This isn't Samsung copying or following or trying to keep up with Apple. Anyone who knows anything about mobile phone hardware knew they were moving to the 64 bit Cortex A50 series chips towards the beginning of next year after the A15s that they are currently using.

 

You guys really need to get over the stupid Apple vs Android vs Windows Phone and who is copying who stuff. They have ALL copied each other at one point or another, just like every other industry since the beginning of time.

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Yes, because using biometric identification is such a revolutionary concept!

 

 

Not true for Android, Android applications are compiled as java bytecode rather than machine code, and as such as long as they are parsed by a 64 bit VM no emulation will be necessary, in fact they will probably continue to work without even needing to be recompiled.

 

I don't think that applies to games written using the NDK, which is pretty much all the high end ones.

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So not only do your users need to enter a 7 character passcode every time they unlock their phone(several times an hour, imagine the time sucked up to do this) but they need to remember a new passcode ever 3 months... Despite the fact it's proven that changing passcodes at time intervals doesn't increase security, but in fact reduces security at worst and at best has no impact. 

 

And if Apple has a proper finger print reader that isn't fooled by "fake" fingers, but requires "live" fingers. it's more secure than any 56 digit passcode you could enforce on them. Seems like your security policies are made by either inept security engineers, or non it/non security people. 

 

even if you are a fortune 100 company, people aren't storing state secrets on the phone that requires such security on them. I would suspect very few of your users chose to connect their phones to the company network with these requirements. 

 

At current in our mdm system we have exactly 55,256 devices enrolled.  Of those 45,986 are iOS devices.  The average checkin time on the iOS device is approx 5 hours.  So, yes we have plenty of employees that use iOS devices on our network.  Now, let's say for argument sake that apple has designed a finger print scanner that can't be fooled by silicon copies, or xerox paper copies, or by other similar easy means.  Then and only then when apple opens the api and allows our mdm provider to provide us with proper control over it will we allow it.  It is that simple.  Do our employees like the 7 character passcode requirement, hell no, we get complaints all the time.  But they have to live with it if they want to be connected 24/7.  Should they choose not to want to accept the 7 character passcode, then they cannot get company info on their device.  Again, simple as that.  As time goes on, apple's touch id may make passcodes useless.  But until then we use what we can control.

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Uhh... this isn't news. This isn't Samsung copying or following or trying to keep up with Apple. Anyone who knows anything about mobile phone hardware knew they were moving to the 64 bit Cortex A50 series chips towards the beginning of next year after the A15s that they are currently using.

 

You guys really need to get over the stupid Apple vs Android vs Windows Phone and who is copying who stuff. They have ALL copied each other at one point or another, just like every other industry since the beginning of time.

I didn't want to bring it up, but there are several roadmaps and releases by samsung themselves, they just had to make this statement to rain on apples parade :) But again, let's not feed teh troll!

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What is the point? There are no 64bit apps and there's very likely not going to be any for a long time, it's pointless putting a 64bit CPU in a phone. It's also a waste of what little memory there is in a phone too

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Right .. but ... but average consumers think they do have a phone with 16/32/64GB of memory :) ...

Just ask them how much memory their phone has, they will let u know :) ...

 

Basically, yeah. I don't see a 64-bit CPU as that big of a deal for my phone.

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What is the point? There are no 64bit apps and there's very likely not going to be any for a long time, it's pointless putting a 64bit CPU in a phone. It's also a waste of what little memory there is in a phone too

 

It's there for 2 reasons:

 

1)  Engineers at these companies know much more than the average forum poster and know what's in the future for their platforms.

 

2)  To make sure those that know NOTHING about this can get their post count up by complaining how it's useless.

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What is the point? There are no 64bit apps and there's very likely not going to be any for a long time, it's pointless putting a 64bit CPU in a phone. It's also a waste of what little memory there is in a phone too

with that attitude we wouldn't be running 64bit on PCs or even 32bit for that matter. heck with that attitude we wouldn't even have smart phones

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It's no secret that the industry as a whole has been working on this. Samsung is not doing it because Apple did it. They are doing it because it has been in development.

The problem is that people want to get all up in arms against Apple because... well, Apple's Apple. They can't announce anything without people immediately dismissing it, whether it's updating their specs, updating their OS, or even giving people options. Apple is damned if they do, damned if they don't. People will never be happy, that much I'm certain on. :ermm:

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Memory allocation isn't the only use for 64-bit processing.

I believe they are using the 64-bit architecture with the fingerprint scanner and probably other things.  

Higher security potential with x64.

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You have no clue how 64 bit works. I thought by now people would know it's not just about memory. Go visit our great friend Google and educate yourself on the matter....please:)

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I don't think that applies to games written using the NDK, which is pretty much all the high end ones.

 

Fair point, can't imagine those being that hard to recompile though

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I'll repeat myself....  Is Android 64bit ??

 

Having a 64bit CPU but only having a 32bit OS is pointless....

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You seem to be confused and spreadign FUD about Windows x86_64 yourself though ... which is weird cause then you go on and say it correctly. 

 

Your whole first paragraph there is just one confusing mess. and as you say x64 is an extension on top ox x86, so if ARM changes more than that, contrary to your claims, that would make compatibility harder, not easier than x64 which is just a superset instruction and not only runs just as fast, but sometimes even allows 32 bit apps to run faster on a 64 bit os with WoW

 

yeah I worded the first part weirdly. my bad. 

 

apparently ARMv8 does have a new set of 64 bit instructions, and changes things related to interrupts and load/stores or something. the instructions themselves are still 32-bit. but the 32-bit instructions remain for compatibility, but I think they're two different sets of instructions rather than just a subset. they also allow a 32bit O/S run a 64-bit hypervisor (whatever that means, but I think apple made use of this on OS X snow leopard IIRC, having a 32bit kernel running 64-bit apps) . and arm already had PAE even in 32-bit, and the new 64-bit model retains compatibility with PAE. 

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