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#31 68k

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:29

An over-engineered solution for an almost non-existent problem that will have a negative impact for the majority of consumers.

I think the fingerprint sensor is a great idea - currently people can easily see what code/swipe patterns are used to unlock a phone; a fingerprint is significantly harder to "see"! (But I don't see a 64-bit sensor framework being any better than a 32-bit version...)




#32 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:33

I think the fingerprint sensor is a great idea - currently people can easily see what code/swipe patterns are used to unlock a phone; a fingerprint is a quite a bit harder to "see". (But I don't see a 64-bit sensor framework being any better than a 32-bit version.)

Yeah, security wise, for enterprises/companies maybe... anyone who wants to steel pr0n from my phone is more than welcome :laugh:



#33 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:38

An over-engineered solution for an almost non-existent problem that will have a negative impact for the majority of consumers.

Non-existent problem?  I think it's a pretty big problem that few people setup security on their phones.  Their non-intrusive scanner could possibly remedy that problem.

 

And please explain why it will have a negative impact?  Nobody is forcing them to use it...



#34 OP #Michael

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:57

Yeah, security wise, for enterprises/companies maybe... anyone who wants to steel pr0n from my phone is more than welcome :laugh:

 

In an enterprise environment it sucks.  Since apple won't open the api for it at this point we won't allow the 5s on our network or for enrollment on our mdm server.  Our eas policy mandates a 7 character passcode on devices.  If someone uses a fingerprint instead then the device becomes non-compliant and won't sync.  IT Sec is already preparing for the headaches this will cause.  So we are basically not allowing this until apple changes the api policy.



#35 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:58

Non-existent problem?  I think it's a pretty big problem that few people setup security on their phones.  Their non-intrusive scanner could possibly remedy that problem.

 

And please explain why it will have a negative impact?  Nobody is forcing them to use it...

But how many really NEED/care for security? It's an added bonus i'll agree.



#36 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:59

In an enterprise environment it sucks.  Since apple won't open the api for it at this point we won't allow the 5s on our network or for enrollment on our mdm server.  Our eas policy mandates a 7 character passcode on devices.  If someone uses a fingerprint instead then the device becomes non-compliant and won't sync.  IT Sec is already preparing for the headaches this will cause.  So we are basically not allowing this until apple changes the api policy.

But when they open the API it will be compliant?

 

So basically without an open API, for strict companies, the finger scanner is useless ?



#37 +fusi0n

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 14:59

About time that phones caught up with my 64 bits Atari Jaguar gaming machine.

I know right! I just got one last weekend :D

IMG_20130909_062105.jpg



#38 Growled

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:00

Non-existent problem?  I think it's a pretty big problem that few people setup security on their phones.  Their non-intrusive scanner could possibly remedy that problem.

 

 

Maybe, but can it be turned off? If it can a lot of people will do it because they don't want to be inconvenienced. 



#39 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:08

Maybe, but can it be turned off? If it can a lot of people will do it because they don't want to be inconvenienced. 

Yeah probably.  Just like you can choose to not setup a passcode.  But it seems like the fingerprint scanner doesn't require any extra effort from the user, so there's not much of a reason to not set it up.  That's all assuming that the scan is quick and accurate every time you put your finger on the home button.  Well shall see.



#40 McKay

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:09

Samsung will need 64-bit Processors because by next year they'll probably be putting 4GB of RAM in their phones :rofl:



#41 farmeunit

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:18

I think we've gotten to the point where no one is actually bringing anything new to the game, it's moarrr specs, moarrrr useless features ( Though I see how the fingerprint unlock is usefull), :/ Man when I first saw the iPhone 4 I was like "what an awesome design"... Every other phone has just been meh... ( I got a galaxy s4, because my 4 was beat up...)

 

The way the companies are merging OSes between mobile and desktop, they're creating an ecosystem so that they'll only need one architecture instead of two.  Sure they're mostly 32-bit now, but even forgetting about memory, why develop for two forever.  64-bit is the future, why is everyone bitching about it so much?  "Let's not advance technology just because we can't use it right now".  Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.



#42 DarkNet

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:21

It's no secret that the industry as a whole has been working on this. Samsung is not doing it because Apple did it. They are doing it because it has been in development.



#43 Julius Caro

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:22

Ugh. People still spreading complete ignorant remarks towards 64-bit. All those things about "32-bit apps will have to be recompiled, wont be compatible" "the emulation layer that will make then run slower", maybe be applied to windows and x86_64 but may not be the case for the ARM 64bit architecture. Which apparently is more than just an extension and changes other things as well. 

 

On the particular case of x86_64 processors, 32-bit binaries STILL run natively, x86_64 is just a superset that includes the older instructions. So, per se, there is no reduction in performance. When interacting with the OS, apps that run in 32-bit will need the OS to provide resources this way as well, and that-s the whole point of WoW64. Still that doesn't imply impacted performance, it means more stuff from the OS will have to be loaded in memory. So it only impacts performance when memory is limited. But since most people agree that the whole point of 64-bit is for "more RAM" (I dont agree with this), then be rest assured that it is not that much of a problem. 

 

 

 

As for ARMv8 in 64-bit, read this http://www.realworldtech.com/arm64/ , then have an opinion.

 

 

There's also implications on how the OS works. Most android apps are developed in Java, which runs on a virtual machine (I said most because portions of an app can be developed in native code).  And these Java apps? They're compiled on the spot. So if the people behind android transition to 64-bit on ARM, if they do it right, most apps will still run and not a "compatibility" layer, but on 64-bits. Java itself is already an extra layer anyway. That's why you can have android on x86 systems and still run the same apps, without developers having to do much at all.



#44 OP #Michael

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:27

But when they open the API it will be compliant?

 

So basically without an open API, for strict companies, the finger scanner is useless ?

 

Not useless but without an open api for the mdm to be able to manage it then we cannot allow it.  We have to be able to manage security settings within an enterprise environment.  Our IT Sec department mandates at least a 7 character passcode on mobile devices.  A fingerprint doesn't conform to that so the mobile device isn't compliant with IT Security requirements and thus won't sync.  Until an api is available to control the scanner and allows us to force a passcode and turn off the scanner then the device cannot be considered compliant.  Simple as that.



#45 +TruckWEB

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 15:31

Is Android available in 64bit??

 

It's one thing to have a 64bit CPU but if the OS can't do anything with it... it's useless.

 

At least Apple made sure that iOS 7 is available in 32/64bit.





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