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#31 Pupik

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 19:35

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

So why use SteamOs and not just Steam on Windows that can already do that?




#32 Athernar

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 19:36

Gaming OS? It will most likely only play Steam games.

 

It won't, simply because as the site indicates the OS is designed for users or developers to replace or modify components, any lockout would just result in an instant fork of the project.

 

If Valve's past talks/presentations are anything to go by, Valve's prime motivation here is opening up the graphics stack so game developers can broadly optimise their titles, rather than make do with the current state of graphics drivers and be confined to internal optimisation.



#33 kaotic

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 19:38

It won't, simply because as the site indicates the OS is designed for users or developers to replace or modify components, any lockout would just result in an instant fork of the project.

 

If Valve's past talks/presentations are anything to go by, Valve's prime motivation here is opening up the graphics stack so game developers can broadly optimise their titles, rather than make do with the current state of graphics drivers and be confined to internal optimisation.

 

Well, let me know when I can play BF4, Titanfall, and Diablo 3 (Path of Exile too) on it. 



#34 Lord Method Man

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 19:44

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

 

Oh great, so one of SteamOS's hardware requirements can be "A completely separate PC with beefy hardware running Windows on your home network"

 

Or I could, you know, connect my Windows PC to my OMG LIVING ROOM TV just as easily I could a box running Steam OS.



#35 Arceles

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:16

Properly coded, switching to OGL would probably be from 50% to even less of the job.

and why would valve with less support and no install base get more support from hardware makers than established and widely used distros? Makes no sense.

And besides that, all other distros would then have the same implementation as SteamOS...

Are you a programmer? Because while I do have programmed not full time in OpenGL, I'm very aware of its current limitations on linux. would you be so kind to tell me your knowledge background?



#36 +Chicane-UK

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:26

I'm amazed at the amount of comments from people writing this off before any details are known beyond the facts that it runs Linux.

 

The Half Life series is one of the most successful gaming franchises of all time. Steam has become THE defacto content delivery system on PC's for gaming enthusiasts with millions of users. Do people not feel that they've not got prior form, or the resources and talent to make a real push here? Why are people so quick to criticise? If you want to carry on using Steam on Windows, what does it matter to you? Carry right on. 

 

Exciting times for the games industry - surely ANY potential change in the dynamics of an industry is interesting, and is usually only a catalyst for improvement. It's only when people sit back and rest on their established products and business practices that things become stagnant. 



#37 HawkMan

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:37

Are you a programmer? Because while I do have programmed not full time in OpenGL, I'm very aware of its current limitations on linux. would you be so kind to tell me your knowledge background?


Professionally no, after majoring in it for stupid reasons, it decided it wasn't what I wanted to do, professionally/primarily. And yes we covered both windows programming and peculiarities of Linux programming.

Either way the majority of the game code exists outside of DX/OGL.

#38 Menge

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:40

I can already imagine Valve having an SDL-like library (for managing windowing and input) which eases the transition from Windows to Linux (SteamOS) and OS X. Other than that, OpenGL and OpenAL will help.

 

They have a lot of influence with hardware manufacturers. It's quite easy to think they'd help some of them build specialized graphics drivers for a few sanctioned video cards to get the ball rolling.

 

Getting developers to ditch DirectX is gonna be a toughie. Unless Valve builds a DirectValveX library of some sorts.



#39 giantpotato

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:52

So why use SteamOs and not just Steam on Windows that can already do that?

Because windows costs $100.

 

This lowers the cost of setting up a secondary gaming box. You can set up a  cheap secondary PC to function like a Vita TV.



#40 +Chicane-UK

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:54

I can already imagine Valve having an SDL-like library (for managing windowing and input) which eases the transition from Windows to Linux (SteamOS) and OS X. Other than that, OpenGL and OpenAL will help.

 

They have a lot of influence with hardware manufacturers. It's quite easy to think they'd help some of them build specialized graphics drivers for a few sanctioned video cards to get the ball rolling.

 

Getting developers to ditch DirectX is gonna be a toughie. Unless Valve builds a DirectValveX library of some sorts.

 

I'd be highly surprised if Valve hasn't already spent considerable time talking with developers to see what their requirements would be for putting games on their platform. 



#41 Athernar

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 20:56

I can already imagine Valve having an SDL-like library (for managing windowing and input) which eases the transition from Windows to Linux (SteamOS) and OS X. Other than that, OpenGL and OpenAL will help.

 

They have a lot of influence with hardware manufacturers. It's quite easy to think they'd help some of them build specialized graphics drivers for a few sanctioned video cards to get the ball rolling.

 

Getting developers to ditch DirectX is gonna be a toughie. Unless Valve builds a DirectValveX library of some sorts.

 

Valve use SDL 2.0, infact the author of said library works at Valve in the Linux cabal.



#42 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 21:26

So, who's the target audience ?

Gamers play on their computers, they also want to use them for other things. So not them
Console gamers, to expensive, not standardized and the vast majority would build/buy a system to install an OS on to save their lives. Leaving the steambox OEM possibility for them, 800 dollar steambox or less than 500 dollar Xbox one that also has access to Xbox music and movies, spotify music while playing games, kinect and so on...


Not saying it'll fail, but I don't see it being a success.

 

The way I see, I think it will be aimed at people in the market for a console who are already heavily invested in PC gaming, and not looking to spend £50 a time one games. The OS itself has the advantage of being separate from the hardware, meaning that one could repurpose an older PC, or optionally build their own. It also allows the possibility that 3rd party Steam boxes could be created. Like I said before, it's also got 200 launch titles (that we know of), so there's that too. Apps-wise, SteamOS could be lacking, but then we've not been told much on that front so it could change.

 

Gaming OS? It will most likely only play Steam games. That means any game from Origin or games you have to install outside of Steam WILL NOT work. You won't be playing BF3, BF4 or Titanfall (when it ships) on SteamOS or SteamBox. 

 

I don't think you're going to see the Steambox with ps4 or xboxone quality of hardware. For that thing to be successful the price will have to be 100-299 dollars. 

 

The reason why a lot of people are dumping on it is because it's pointless when you have linux distros (and windows) that already have Steam and play just fine. 

 

So by that logic, the Xbox One isn't a "gaming console" because I can't play ARMA III on it. I agree that there won't be as many AAA titles for Steam OS as for the consoles, but then again, let's wait and see :).

 

Hardware-wise, we know nothing but guesses, so we'll have to wait for another 43 hours to see what they announce next.

 

I disagree that having a separate Steam OS is pointless. One of the things that drives games development away from Linux (aside the small market share) is the abundance of different distros. Giving everyone a single, well supported and specialized distro to get behind will be beneficial to Linux as a whole, especially if Valve pump their changes upstream when possible. My only hope is that SteamOS won't be TOO specialized and end up making it so that games written for SteamOS won't work on other distros.

 

Like I said, we have exactly a third of a picture, and we'll likely be waiting until the end of the week before we know the full story. That was my point!



#43 Lord Method Man

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 21:29

 

 

I disagree that having a separate Steam OS is pointless. One of the things that drives games development away from Linux (aside the small market share) is the abundance of different distros. Giving everyone a single, well supported and specialized distro to get behind will be beneficial to Linux as a whole, especially if Valve pump their changes upstream when possible. My only hope is that SteamOS won't be TOO specialized and end up making it so that games written for SteamOS won't work on other distros.

 

 

So yet another distro will somehow fix that? People spent years trying to prop up Ubuntu as the single "main" Linux distro and now here comes a walking hunk of cholesterol saying he's going to cut that off at the knees with a SteamOS.



#44 Snake89

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 21:29

How many of these Crybabies here remember "WineX", the directx 9.0 API made for Linux. Today it's known as Cider from http://transgaming.com/ Without it many of todays Mac games wouldn't be possible. So valve and other game devs could just use this to make games available on Linux.



#45 Gerowen

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 21:40

So this was their big announcement for the living room...Linux? When it comes to gaming that's hardly the first thing I think of.

It wouldn't make business sense to use an OS that would require you to pay royalty fees.  Better to take some free open source code and have your way with it without having to worry about licensing fees and bugs in proprietary software you don't have the source code for.