52 posts in this topic

I would say yes, it does matter. Allowing that group into Gettysburg makes a mockery of everything that place stands for.

Maybe they just want to honor their southern brethren.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say yes, it does matter. Allowing that group into Gettysburg makes a mockery of everything that place stands for.

 

I guess I'm looking at it like the KKK is fallout from the Civil War. It's a part of that History. We do Civil War re-enactments and don't say, no one should be confederates, it was treason, murder, etc. etc. You gotta take the good with the bad when revisiting history. Get too bent out of shape about it and you empower them. That's what they want. They feel powerless and insignificant, which they are.

 

You do know that Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forest was the first Grand Wizard of the KKK don't you? Perhaps going to Gettysburg will educate people as to just who these people were and are ... evil losers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now there's something I didn't know about the Confederates and all that but I guess it makes sense considering the war was based around if somewhat unintentionally, the emancipation of the coloured minority.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other bits of history -

1) Klansmen were mostly Democrats, with Republicans mostly being the abolitionists against slavery.

2) the events around the (Virgil & Wyatt) Earp's Cochise County battles with Clanton gang (aka "Cowboys" because many of the 200-300 Cowboys were rustlers) was highly political, the Earp's being Republicans and the Clanton gang former Confederate Democrats. Some were Klansmen.

3) the 1924 Democrat Presidential Convention in New York City was known as the Klanbake because of the large number of Klan delegates. There was huge Klan parade associated with it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1924_Democratic_National_Convention

4) in 1928 there were 4,000,000 Klansmen in the US, and in Sept. of that year ~50,000 marched on Washington DC.

5) One prominent Klansman was Hugo Black, later appointed to the US Supreme Court by President Franklin Roosevelt. He served until 1971.

Others who were at one time Klan members -

Pres. Harry S. Truman (D-MO) (1945-1953)

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W. Va). Served until 2010.

1928 KKK DC parade

kkk_dcmarch.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other bits of history -

1) Klansmen were mostly Democrats, with Republicans mostly being the abolitionists against slavery.

2) the events around the (Virgil & Wyatt) Earp's Cochise County battles with Clanton gang (aka "Cowboys" because many of the 200-300 Cowboys were rustlers) was highly political, the Earp's being Republicans and the Clanton gang former Confederate Democrats. Some were Klansmen.

3) the 1924 Democrat Presidential Convention in New York City was known as the Klanbake because of the large number of Klan delegates. There was huge Klan parade associated with it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1924_Democratic_National_Convention

4) in 1928 there were 4,000,000 Klansmen in the US, and in Sept. of that year ~50,000 marched on Washington DC.

5) One prominent Klansman was Hugo Black, later appointed to the US Supreme Court by President Franklin Roosevelt. He served until 1971.

Others who were at one time Klan members -

Pres. Harry S. Truman (D-MO) (1945-1953)

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W. Va). Served until 2010.

1928 KKK DC parade

kkk_dcmarch.jpg

 

This is all true. I don't think the parties matter. They have switched many times. Democrats took knives and guns to congress to defend slavery. The parties have splintered several times. It can be traced, but no point. It's the people. Racism and hatred do not come from a party or affiliation, which is why the parties have split several times. Clearly today's republican party is not the same as Lincolns.

 

Really as it relates to this, the only parties that mattered were Union and Confederate. Many Union soldiers didn't really care for blacks. But they knew right from wrong.

 

And that's what it's all about, right vs. wrong. After we revisit America's history, which does help explain why society is the way it is today, we have to visit individuals. Regardless of how much more difficult things may be for minorities based on our history, it's clearly better and opportunity is present, there is no excuse for some of the "wrong" behavior from African Americans. Slaves had much more fortitude and backbone that say, today's punk ass gang bangers victimizing and poisoning their own neighborhoods.

 

Of course, it's meaningless to discuss these things here. Unfortunately, there is no "leader." We've become a melting pot of damaged people. If the Human Race lives long enough, race will not matter one day. But that's a long way away.

 

Edit: One note to keep this from becoming about race, it's actually about hatred. It was white Americans who fought to destroy the Klan at the height of its power. Many were killed and they endangered their lives and families. They had prominent and political positions and still did the right thing. Racism is just one of many vehicles for hatred.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe they just want to honor their southern brethren.

 

I am Southern, born and bred, and to me the KKK is a mockery of everything Southern. Yes, it is a part of history but some parts of history are to be remembered so we don't repeat the sins of the past, not to be celebrated. And btw, not every Southern person owned slaves back in the day. It was the wealthy that did so. The poor white people wasn't any better off than the slaves. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

the whole lmgtfy thing isn't as funny or clever as people think it is.

 

 

Anyway, I was making the point the ACLU would defend the KKK in a matter like this. ACLU defends free speech regardless of who is expressing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh god, I'd hate to go there as a British person they would hate me, but yes they do have a right to their opinion, I just wonder how many non-Americans they'll be shooting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh god, I'd hate to go there as a British person they would hate me, but yes they do have a right to their opinion, I just wonder how many non-Americans they'll be shooting.

kkk is harmless anymore. last i heard out of them is that one group of kkk protested another for being too bigoted. black people kill more of themselves in 6 months and than the klan did in it's whole history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wonder how many non-Americans they'll be shooting.

 

:s  :s  :s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I just wonder how many non-Americans they'll be shooting.

 

None hopefully. If they do something like that no one would ever issue them another permit to march again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest estimates put their official national numbers at about 3-5,000, but I'd say closer to 100,000 when you consider cross-pollination with the neo-NAZI's. They do tend to cluster though.

I remember years ago my then college g/f and I getting invited to a wedding in a very small village some distance north of Ann Arbor MI (we were students at the U of M.) When we arrived we turned right around and split - it was a Klan wedding and everyone was dressed up in Klan garb. Uh-no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have very colorful robes, so sleek and shiny  :|

 

adCxUVH.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i didn't know that the KKK was still active. :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have very colorful robes, so sleek and shiny  :|

 

adCxUVH.jpg

 

 

Bigot pajama party

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they were real men they would show their faces. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am Southern, born and bred, and to me the KKK is a mockery of everything Southern. Yes, it is a part of history but some parts of history are to be remembered so we don't repeat the sins of the past, not to be celebrated. And btw, not every Southern person owned slaves back in the day. It was the wealthy that did so. The poor white people wasn't any better off than the slaves. 

Interesting and true. Post-reconstruction, as we moved more towards a class-based society, the poor became the most vehement racists. Definitely and interesting sociological study. Way too deep for Neowin, but interesting.

 

On this subject in general, I think it best to give these types some form of outlet that doesn't necessarily harm others, and allows the civilized to know where they are and what they are thinking. Would you rather have them invisible, conspiring violence in hate incognito? Best to let them exercise their rights within the law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Would you rather have them invisible, conspiring violence in hate incognito? Best to let them exercise their rights within the law.

 

I think we can allow them to exercise their rights without giving them national exposure. I don't believe the federal government should allow them to march on any federal property, same as with any other group. There is a whole nation of little backwater towns they can exercise their rights in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we can allow them to exercise their rights without giving them national exposure. I don't believe the federal government should allow them to march on any federal property, same as with any other group. There is a whole nation of little backwater towns they can exercise their rights in.

 

Federal property is public land and the right to assemble there is protected by the First Amendment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Federal property is public land and the right to assemble there is protected by the First Amendment.

 

I shall post the First Amendment to make a point:

 

 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

 

It says nothing about parks.

 

http://news.findlaw.com/features/protester-rights.html

 

 

The right is not absolute, however. State, local and federal governments can regulate how people express themselves, provided that they adhere to certain principles laid down by the United States Supreme Court.

 

Notice it says by the Supreme Court. If the court decides something, they can later undecide if they want. The right is not absolute. Schools are public places too, but protests aren't allowed there, for obvious reasons.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as I agree with their right to he there and say their piece, good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as long as there is not a lynching then let them be...everyone has rights to their ideas and ideals even if they are so 1800s...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries now. :laugh:

 

I was so looking forward to it ....

 

KKK Rally At Gettysburg Canceled Because Of Government Shutdown

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/01/kkk-rally-canceled_n_4024192.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

LMAO! How long until Fox News states that the government shutdown was Obama's attempt to stop the KKK from exercising its First Amendment rights?  :laugh:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.