Jump to content



Photo

Laptop Question


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 02 October 2013 - 21:05

I should really post this in hardware, but everyone would be pointing me at Windows laptops. I want something that works OOTB.

 

I've had my eye on this: https://www.system76...ops/model/galu1

 

The real thing that opened my eyes was "4th Generation Intel Core i7-4750HQ". I'm like, wow, and that's under $1,000? I looked up the CPU benchmarks on notebookcheck, that's really up there...

 

Lowest memory it comes with is 4GB. I can just flip out the RAM I currently updated in my Acer laptop (8GB). It has a max of 16GB, so I can always upgrade.

 

Integrated video, but I'm not the biggest gamer, and can just game on my desktop.

 

HDD is no issue, I have a spare SSD that I can use on there.

 

Plus it is a ultrabook, what I was previously looked into.

 

I looked on several Linux-like laptop shops, none of them were close to this. All of them were like $1,500+ for that kind of CPU.

 

What you guys think? I might get this in a few months. Right now I have no money, but a friend of mine is going to hire me in his hosting company. (in my sig) In a few months, as soon as he gets buyers, I shall have enough money. :D

 

Edit: Oh, I might just wipe Ubuntu off there and install Debian Wheezy. I'm more into that ;)




#2 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 02 October 2013 - 22:59

I am a huge fan of System76. Their hardware and support is top-notch. Although they ship all of their computers with Ubuntu, I know people with their hardware who have Debian and Arch working on it flawlessly. Officially System76 will only offer you software support if you are running a version of Ubuntu they officially support, but they have been known to give "unofficial advice" for other distributions as well. The Galago UltraPro is indeed a slick computer. System76 is the only company that has managed to make me consider switching brands when I am ready to replace my ThinkPad T410. I say go for it!



#3 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 03 October 2013 - 02:36

Cheers, Orange! At least I can be certain that this isn't a mirage or anything. :laugh:

 

Any more takers on this?



#4 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 03 October 2013 - 19:07

My next computer is going to be System76 for sure. That one you linked to is a really nice device. I could see myself using it quite nicely.

 

Would you be putting Debian on it? 



#5 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 03 October 2013 - 19:13

As I said in my first post, yes, Debian all the way!

 

I would be putting my other SSD in there, so I can leave the initial drive untouched, should I run into problems. I envision not, but just keep it unscathed for a few weeks. ;)



#6 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 04 October 2013 - 00:15

As I said in my first post, yes, Debian all the way!

 

 

I didn't make myself clear, and that's my fault. Sorry. What I meant was will Debian even run on that? I've heard it has problems with some of the newer hardware.



#7 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 04 October 2013 - 00:37

I didn't make myself clear, and that's my fault. Sorry. What I meant was will Debian even run on that? I've heard it has problems with some of the newer hardware.

 

If you are referring to Linux 3.2's support for the 4th generatation Core-I series processors (or more specifically the lack thereof), you are correct. Using the stock Wheezy kernel on the System76 Galago UltraPro will likely result in X locking up constantly. However, there are a couple of "Debian" solutions to this problem. If you wish to run the current stable release, installing the Linux kernel from backports will give you support for the latest hardware. If you would also like to take advantage of the performance improvements Intel has commited to Mesa for their new 5000 series GPUs, the best option is probably to run Debian Testing. Personally if I had the Galago UltraPro, I would opt for the second choice.



#8 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 04 October 2013 - 02:16

Debian in testing is currently Jessie, right?



#9 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 04 October 2013 - 02:23

Correct. Jessie is currently Testing, and will be for the next three or so years. You can install it (1) by installing Wheezy and upgrading, (2) using one of the daily Debian Installer snapshots, or (3) through debootstrap. I recommend option #2 for your new machine.



#10 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 04 October 2013 - 02:34

Are there any downsides to running Testing?



#11 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 04 October 2013 - 03:13

Are there any downsides to running Testing?

 

Absolutely! There are more likely to be bugs in Testing than Stable because the software it contains is much closer to upstream stable versions and has not been tested as thoroughly, hence the name. However each package has had at least some testing when it was in Unstable that should catch any catastrophic problems, therefore there is very little chance that a bug in Testing will result in any major issues. As a result of the ongoing effort to develop the infrastructure to run automated regression tests on the Debian archive (particularly Unstable), the number of bugs reported in Testing has dropped dramatically (at least for packages that have enabled these tests). Due to the fairly rapid rate of change in the archive (at least when it is not in release freeze), bugs reported in Testing are likely to be fixed fairly quickly. This testing will also help to improve the quality of the next stable release.

 

In my opinion, the benefits of running Testing far outweigh the drawbacks for typical desktop users. My youngest sister - who has no development experience and clearly fits into the category of "typical" user - has had no problems running Testing almost exclusively for years. Testing is generally stable enough that I would not hesitate to run it on my desktop, although I would still strongly recommend using Stable exclusively on production servers. I am far from the only one who takes this position. The current Debian Project Leader (DPL) has reiterated a similar sentiment numerous time. He has also publicly stated that he runs Debian Testing exclusively on his primary personal computer.



#12 Brian M.

Brian M.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 07-January 05
  • Location: London, UK

Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:16

I also run testing on workstations, and stable on servers.

I couldn't care less if the software on my server is a couple of minor revisions behind the latest and greatest. I'd rather have something that's tried and tested running my network!

#13 jaylittle

jaylittle

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 07-December 01

Posted 10 October 2013 - 10:56

As somebody who owns three System 76 machines (Pangolin Performance 9, Bonobo Extreme 6 and Gazelle Professional 9) I can certainly attest to their quality hardware.  However as my Gazelle Professional 9 has Haswell hardware in it, let me be the first to warn you:  Linux support for the latest Intel processor platform is coming along well, but it still has it's quirks.  Especially if you are running a distribution that isn't so bleeding edge.  The current 13.04 release of Ubuntu has issues with Haswell hardware that in theory will be almost totally resolved when the 13.10 release hits sometime later this month (since I'm running Arch I'm pretty familiar with the Haswell related improvements in the cutting edge kernels/xorg drivers).

As for the Galago Pro itself, I've seen mixed feedback on this model in the System76 support forum.  I would advise you to do the research before buying.  The complaints seem to largely revolve around the keyboard.  Some of the problems related to it have been solved by current models adding some sort of backing plate to the chassis.  Beyond those general details, I don't know a whole lot as I don't own this particular model.

Best of luck!



#14 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:40

Yeah, as I said before, I plan to put in my spare SSD and put Debian on it. As Orange explained, Debian Jessie has support for Haswell CPUs.

 

I'm not getting it any time soon, so I can research it to my content. Dunno whats the issue with the keyboard, though. Have to research on that issue.





Click here to login or here to register to remove this ad, it's free!