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3D printing live: Guess the royal baby christening gift

3d printing live royal baby christening gift

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#16 68k

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:49

If I were three and receiving that gift, the first thing I would think would be "plastic?". What a waste of time.




#17 DocM

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 13:39

3D printing has existed for 20-30 years.

it has gotten better but for quality manufacturing it's still to slow and costly,
>

I guess that's why China is printing LARGE bulkheads and other parts for their new front line fighters?

Medical implant companies are beginning to use them instead of machining?

SpaceX is printing parts including valves bodies, and even rocket engines (the SuperDraco abort/landing thruster for DragonRider)?

One of the big hits of the recent Maker's Faire was a liquid metal jet deposition printer that only used 400w for $10k that can print with 20u quality?

China says laser additive manufacturing saves 90% of raw material, and the end cost is a fraction of the traditional methods. Ex: the cost of a J-15 part made with traditional technology is $4 million, but using laser additive manufacturing the cost is only $210k.

Fighters today, passenger cars and jets tomorrow, everything else before you can blink.

#18 HawkMan

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 13:55

Fighters and medical equipment is not even close to what you're talking about earlier though.

 

as I said, 3D printing has been used for over 20 years, especially in precision and specialist manufacturing like fighters and medical equipments where the price of an individual part and the time to make it is't a factor. 

 

Also these parts are not made with extrusion and deposit type machines, that's generally for prototyping with a few rare exceptions. 

 

Parts are made with 5 axis(+) CnC milling machines, which are also 3D printers. 



#19 DocM

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 14:02

By specifying additive manufacturing they are excluding computerized CnC etc. which are subtractive.

#20 HawkMan

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 14:09

Additive 3D printed parts may be cheaper on raw materials(if you selectively forget that the materials can be re-used and that structurally the additive parts aren't as solid yet today. though they may be solid enough, though they'll probably have a shorter life before replacement on such things as a fighter) that subtractive, BUT traditional non 3D printed parts are still cheaper and more solid and use just as little materials as additive though. 

 

using a laser to structurally bind metal powder in a printing process, or pouring it liquid into a mould use the same amount of raw material. 



#21 DocM

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 15:16

A huge part of casting is making the mold, and huge numbers of those are now being printed.

As to sintered metals strength, be it laser or plasma or electron beam, it's durable enough to be approved for surgical implants and it can do something CnC or casting can't do: create microstructure metal foams. This is huge for implants because it allows bone to grow into them, and is huge for batteries & fuel cells. Printing organic structures is taking off, and microchips & other electronics is taxiing to the runway.

No matter if you use additive to build the structure itself or the mold to do the casting, this train has left the station.

#22 HawkMan

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 15:40

Yes, but none of that means that it will take over for major parts of mass manufacturing in the next 10years as was the claim. These are all specialist applications.

#23 DocM

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 15:46

We'll see. IMO we're at the verge of a Moore's Law of Manufacturing, driven by an explosion in printers making printers and the rapid evolution of same.

#24 Ian William

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 04:47

"Can you guess what it is?"

Is it a big, fat, polyester dinosaur who's the color of an International House of Pancakes, with a paper plate over his face?