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Debian static IP in router log

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#16 OP cork1958

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 14:22

OK, here's what I'm seeing/talking about.

 

The first image is immediately after starting computer and the second is after disconnecting network using wicd, then connecting back up in wicd, and then rebooting router.

 

No more 192.168.1.148 and then it shows the static IP I have set for 192.168.1.109. That 192.168.1.15 is my Vonage adapter.

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#17 The_Decryptor

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:27

Where does your router show this IP? Is it listed under the ARP table or somewhere else?

#18 OP cork1958

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:33

This is under the Device/Status page using Tomato firmware in my router.



#19 +BudMan

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 14:45

"disconnecting network using wicd, then connecting back up in wicd, and then rebooting router."

 

So why would you reboot the router?  And why are you disconnecting and reconnecting?

 

You mentioned "I installed wicd so I could add static IP's to my network configuration on a couple desktops"

 

So when your box boot it grabs a dhcp address I hae to assume - then you use some gui to setup a static on the box.

 

Why don't you just edit your /etc/network/interfaces file?

 

Let us see that file

 

example - here is mine

 

budman@ubuntu:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.7
netmask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.253
 

 

You notice mine is static..  And where exactly is that on your router - dhcp leases?  Arp Table?  Connected devices?  Where?



#20 OP cork1958

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 01:09

"disconnecting network using wicd, then connecting back up in wicd, and then rebooting router."

 

So why would you reboot the router? And why are you disconnecting and reconnecting?

 

1. I am disconnecting and then reconnecting so I can get the static IP address I have assigned to my nic, to be the one I'm actually connecting to. I am then rebooting the router solely to get rid of that "extra" IP address. Simply don't like the looks of it there!

 

You mentioned "I installed wicd so I could add static IP's to my network configuration on a couple desktops"

 

So when your box boot it grabs a dhcp address I hae to assume - then you use some gui to setup a static on the box.

 

Why don't you just edit your /etc/network/interfaces file?

 

2. Simply because I don't know how and haven't looked that up. As I mentioned, I'm no where near a Linux guru and some what despise using the command line.

 

Not on a Linux box now so can't show you my /etc/network/interfaces



#21 OP cork1958

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:46

"And where exactly is that on your router - dhcp leases? Arp Table? Connected devices? Where? "

 

As I already stated, it's under the Status/Devices (had that part turned around previously) page in Tomato firmware in my router.

 

No,

I'm not on a Linux box now.

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#22 OP cork1958

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 14:33   Best Answer

"disconnecting network using wicd, then connecting back up in wicd, and then rebooting router."

 

So why would you reboot the router?  And why are you disconnecting and reconnecting?

 

You mentioned "I installed wicd so I could add static IP's to my network configuration on a couple desktops"

 

So when your box boot it grabs a dhcp address I hae to assume - then you use some gui to setup a static on the box.

 

Why don't you just edit your /etc/network/interfaces file?

 

Let us see that file

 

example - here is mine

 

budman@ubuntu:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.7
netmask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.253
 

 

You notice mine is static..  And where exactly is that on your router - dhcp leases?  Arp Table?  Connected devices?  Where?

 

Hey!

 

There is my problem! I didn't know how to edit the interfaces using command line, and in fact didn't think it would/should be necessary, after entering stuff in the default network connections under Applications/Settings/Network Connections and then in wicd also, whether as the only setting or combined with other setting. If that makes any sense!!

 

What's the sense of even having those 2 tools, if they basically do nothing?

 

Definitely all fixed now!! :)

Learn something new everyday, which is ALWAYS cool.

 

Thanks Budman and others!!