Jump to content



Photo

My Experience With Linux


  • Please log in to reply
87 replies to this topic

#1 Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 09 October 2013 - 00:02

A year ago today (give or take a few days) I started running Linux 100%. Never looked back to Windows. I tried to help my Mom with her Windows 7 machine from time to time, and I was like, bleh... As soon as I got up to Linux 100%, my dad was interested in it, and I installed Mint 14 Cinnamon on his system.

 

I can tell you, it's been a ride. But I think I broke through most of it. For those I couldn't, I just discarded and found an alternate.

 

I started with Ubuntu 12.10, went between Debian Squeeze, #!Crunchbang, Fedora, Arch, Gentoo, maybe a few others that I can't remember. I am now settled with Debian Wheezy 7. Using XFCE 4.8.3.

 

The reason I went to Linux, was because 90% of what I ran was open source. And I didn't like Windows 8 for a desktop. I tested it before then, but didn't use it as a mainstream OS. Also because I wanted more choice.

 

I liked Unity, but after awhile, it really hurt my system, hogging down the video card. So, then I went to GNOME, and used that for maybe 5 months, then I was looking into Openbox, but I found that a bit... odd. So now for the last 3 months, I've been on XFCE. Gives me a lot of options on my panel. Whisker Menu Bar was a godsend. :laugh:

 

Now, I look Windows as... meh. As more games are now coming to Linux, it's a better time to switch. Yeah, I know not all, but most. All I play is Minecraft these days, but who knows... Could get into more games, or just go with consoles, like the SteamBox or PS4.




#2 Barney T.

Barney T.

    Debian Linux: I'm Loving It!

  • Tech Issues Solved: 3
  • Joined: 30-August 03
  • Location: Williamsburg, Virginia

Posted 09 October 2013 - 00:27

Congrats! I started with Red Hat 9 and love many flavors of Linux too. I must have had almost all of the major distros on my box at one point or another, including a BSD or two at one point.  Debian especially rocks. Enjoy :punk:



#3 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:20

Yeah, thanks, Barney. :)

 

I used to mess with Linux back in the days, with RedHat, Ubuntu, Xubuntu, Puppy, DSL, etc. But I would have that on my VM, but the next day, I dis it.



#4 Brian M.

Brian M.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 07-January 05
  • Location: London, UK

Posted 09 October 2013 - 09:14

Debian is my favourite distro by far - I use it on all of my boxes. Stable for servers, testing for desktops.



#5 SuperKid

SuperKid

    Im no superman

  • Joined: 21-April 08
  • Location: Birmingham, England, UK
  • OS: OS X 10.8, iOS 7
  • Phone: iPhone 4S

Posted 09 October 2013 - 11:38

I love Debian for servers, great distro! Never tried it for desktop, only Linux I really ever used for desktop is Ubuntu. May give some others a try sometime.



#6 Jack Unterweger

Jack Unterweger

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 19-January 03
  • OS: Kubuntu 14.04.1 x64
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy S3

Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:19

congratulations to your successfull migration. i understand perfectly your words and reasons, its been basically the very same for me since i went fully to linux 4 years ago. most software is free/open source, and the customization is even better than under windows. also you learn quite a bit about computers/software in general when using linux, (even if you go for an easy distro like ubuntu). i bet basically every linux user has no issues to install and work with macosx or windows. but for most windows users if you give them a linux distro to install and making work, they need to learn it first



#7 Xahid

Xahid

    Anokha Neowinian

  • Joined: 04-November 01
  • OS: Windows 7 Ultimate

Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:33

Congrats :)

I just use CentOS for my Servers.



#8 tsupersonic

tsupersonic

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 30-September 06
  • Location: USA
  • OS: Win. 8.1 Pro. x64/Mac OS X
  • Phone: iPhone 5S/Nexus 5

Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:39

I like Linux to tinker with, but I still have so many reliability/stability problems that I can't use it on my main system. I do have Ubuntu installed on an extra computer I had lying around. I am a bigger fan of enterprise Unix - AIX specifically. 



#9 Max Norris

Max Norris

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 20-February 11
  • OS: Windows, BSD & Arch, Occasionally OSX
  • Phone: HTC One (Home) Lumia 1020 (Work)

Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:43

Same, really dig it in a server setup (well mostly BSD but there's a few Linux boxes), don't much care for it on the desktop for a number of reasons, but the server side really "meshes" nicely with Windows as a front-end. 



#10 cork1958

cork1958

    Neowinian

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 04-October 02

Posted 09 October 2013 - 13:06

Have played around with several different distros also, but Debian is rockin' my world, as of now, on 2 of my boxes.

 

Have had it installed for around 6-7 months now and that's probably the longest I've ever left a Linux distro left installed.

 

Rock solid, but still can't ditch Windows totally.

 

Good luck and congrats! :)



#11 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 09 October 2013 - 15:41

The reason I went to Linux, was because 90% of what I ran was open source. And I didn't like Windows 8 for a desktop. I tested it before then, but didn't use it as a mainstream OS. Also because I wanted more choice.

 

I've been running Linux since 2007, off and on. When I finally realized earlier this year that almost every piece of software I ran was open source, I said I would be crazy not to switch. I'm so glad I did. What was icing on the cake for me was to learn that some things that I do was much faster and easier on Linux than Windows. 

 

 

Now, I look Windows as... meh. As more games are now coming to Linux, it's a better time to switch. Yeah, I know not all, but most. All I play is Minecraft these days, but who knows... Could get into more games, or just go with consoles, like the SteamBox or PS4.

 

I don't see me ever going back to Windows again. I'm on Linux Mint 15 Cinnamon and it just works, now that I've got it tweaked right. I just can't get into Debian proper, though.



#12 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 09 October 2013 - 18:48

Thanks, all. Linux, just, works. Apt-get is the greatest tool I found. Only thing you need to do is press yes or no. Not do you agree, next, next, next. :p

 

 

My internet was down today until now. :p



#13 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 09 October 2013 - 22:11

I have used Linux exclusively on my personal machines for several years now, but my justification for it is slightly different than yours. It's not about what I can do in GNU/Linux; it's about what I can't do in other operating systems.

 

Let me explain. I once used Windows exclusively. When I built my first computer in junior high school, my dad bough me a copy of the recently-released Windows XP Professional to go with it. He also gave me a copy of Red Hat Linux 9 and the accompanying (paper-back) user manual that he bought at CompUSA, and he encouraged me to dual-boot. Foolishly, I didn't. I didn't see the point of Linux. To be completely honest, although I considered myself a Windows power user at the time, I didn't really understand Windows that well either. I played with various Linux distributions a few times after that, but it was never more than idle curiosity.

 

Fast-forward to my freshman year of college. I had started programming in high school, and had become reasonably proficient at C++. As an indirect result, I had learned more about open-source software and started using a lot of it on my machines (Firefox, VLC, MinGW, Notepad++, etc.). Unrelated to my evolving programming skills, I had also become much more adept at fixing problems with Windows. For that reason I was offered a job at my university's IT help desk, which I accepted. One of my coworkers - a man whom I learned a lot from and still have a great deal of respect for - introduced me to Ubuntu. Not only did he introduce me, but he challenged me. Therefore I quickly moved from virtualizing Ubuntu to dual-booting it with Windows on my desktop.

 

Jump forward another couple years. By the end of my sophomore year of college, I was using Ubuntu far more often than Windows on my desktop. I had reached the point where I only booted into Windows to play games and install security updates. Since I wanted my data available in both operating systems, I still stored the vast majority of it on my primary NTFS partition, which I kept mounted in Ubuntu. I even went so far as to write scripts for programs such as Pidgin and VirtualBox to keep their profiles in sync between the two operating systems. That was a hassle, and there seemed to be no shortage of bugs to be discovered with those scripts. At that point I realized how much of a pain dual-booting really is, so I chose to move all of my important data to Ubuntu and slim down my Windows installation to just games. Since this strategy worked so well on my desktop, I also completely replaced Windows with Ubuntu on my laptop.

 

The narrative above is missing one key factor: why did I decide to go with Ubuntu over Windows as my main OS? After all, Windows had an obvious advantage: it ran all my games. However Ubuntu had a huge advantage too: a powerful command-line. In the end, the command-line won. I felt like I could do more work faster using the terminal than using functionally-equivalent GUI applications most of the time. I really like the UNIX philosophy. The Advanced Package Tool in particular was one of the most compelling factors of my choice. As time went on, I came to favor the command-line even more. I heavily rely on it in my daily workflow today. The lack thereof remains the number one thing that bothers me when I use Windows. Neither Cygwin nor Powershell cut it (although Cygwin is definitely closer).

 

Shortly after my decision to use Ubuntu as my primary OS, my Windows installation fell into disrepair. My programming and hiking habits began to eat the free time I used to use to play games. When I did decide to play video games, I played mostly Minecraft, which was really nice because I didn't have to boot into Windows to play it. Booting Windows became a little discouraging because I used it so infrequently that literally every time I booted into it, I had Windows updates waiting to be installed. Therefore I switched to Debian on my desktop (and later my laptop) and completely removed Windows. Although I do not regret the decision to live without Windows in any way, I felt somewhat vindicated when Valve brought Steam to Linux, along with some of my favorite games. I still don't play video games very often, but the growing trend towards releasing cross-platform games virtually eliminates the singular advantage I once awarded to Windows when I was debating switching to Ubuntu.

 

Although I think that users all-too-often malign the command-line rather than seeking to take full advantage of it, I am far from the only one who sees a good POSIX shell and the traditional UNIX utilities as a huge asset. In fact, Michael Dominick listed it as chief among his reasons for preferring Ubuntu over other operating systems in this week's Coder Radio. As fellow Neowin Linux users, I hope you will agree.



#14 OP Mindovermaster

Mindovermaster

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 9
  • Joined: 25-January 07
  • Location: /USA/Wisconsin/
  • OS: Mint Debian LMDE
  • Phone: HTC ONE V

Posted 09 October 2013 - 22:27

Interesting read, Orange. Where did you transfer from Ubuntu to Debian?



#15 Andre S.

Andre S.

    Asik

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 26-October 05

Posted 09 October 2013 - 22:32

I still see no use for desktop Linux, personally. It seems like a fine system for those willing to tinker and customize their OS; to me the best OS is the one I most rarely notice.

 

Windows runs my favorite IDE (Visual Studio), favorite bittorent client (uTorrent), favorite music player (foobar2000), a variety of excellent video players (MPC-HC, VLC, KMPlayer, all of which I find best in different circumstances), my favorite office suite (MS Office), my favorite screen capture utilities (Fraps, Action!), my favorite video editor (Virtual Dub), it has Internet Explorer which, like it or not, still sometimes is the most compatible browser for certain sites; it has the best drivers for all my hardware, and most open-source software available on Linux is available for it as well.

 

Above all, I don't need to do anything to get it working the way I want to. (well, with Windows 8, I actually have to do 2 things - StartIsBack + uninstall all the metro apps - but still.)