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Teen punished for giving drunken friend a ride home

massachusetts classmate zero tolerance sobriety lawsuit

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#16 rippleman

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:13

i gave my buddy a ride home from the bank once. He was drunk, high, and just robbed the place. But why should I be punished? All i did was drive him.... /s




#17 Raze

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:26

i gave my buddy a ride home from the bank once. He was drunk, high, and just robbed the place. But why should I be punished? All i did was drive him.... /s

 

Is this your buddy, maybe he won't mention his get-away driver - http://www.calgaryhe...1690/story.html                           /s



#18 zhangm

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:46

i gave my buddy a ride home from the bank once. He was drunk, high, and just robbed the place. But why should I be punished? All i did was drive him.... /s


I was a taxi driver and drove some drunk people home when they called me, so that they wouldn't kill themselves or others that they encountered on the road while intoxicated. Why haven't the police arrested me yet?

#19 rippleman

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:40

I was a taxi driver and drove some drunk people home when they called me, so that they wouldn't kill themselves or others that they encountered on the road while intoxicated. Why haven't the police arrested me yet?

the story was written like the way you just did too, but behind the scenes she was being an accessory by sneaking him out to avoid punishment, effectively becoming part of the publishable action.



#20 mudslag

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:52

the story was written like the way you just did too, but behind the scenes she was being an accessory by sneaking him out to avoid punishment, effectively becoming part of the publishable action.

 

 

The kid asked for a ride home, not a ride to the party. I know you put the sarcasm mark down on the previous post but that's still silly to make the comparison and assumption that she is some how an accessory so some other kid wouldn't get in trouble. 



#21 zhangm

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:57

the story was written like the way you just did too, but behind the scenes she was being an accessory by sneaking him out to avoid punishment, effectively becoming part of the publishable action.


Under the law, the driver in this case is absolved of any responsibility. Quite frankly, legally it is irrelevant what you've deemed the situation to be. If you're somehow uncertain, maybe you should like to defer to the police opinion, which "recognized her sobriety". The school is implementing punishment above and beyond the law here like a bunch of god damned idiots because somehow the rules have gone and scooped out their brains.

#22 Thrackerzod

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:58

i gave my buddy a ride home from the bank once. He was drunk, high, and just robbed the place. But why should I be punished? All i did was drive him.... /s

 

In that situation you would be aiding in committing a felony. The girl in the article wasn't aiding in getting her friend drunk, she just drove her home. 



#23 rippleman

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:05

The kid asked for a ride home, not a ride to the party. I know you put the sarcasm mark down on the previous post but that's still silly to make the comparison and assumption that she is some how an accessory so some other kid wouldn't get in trouble. 

she aided her friend to escape detection/punishment

 

Under the law, the driver in this case is absolved of any responsibility. Quite frankly, legally it is irrelevant what you've deemed the situation to be. If you're somehow uncertain, maybe you should like to defer to the police opinion, which "recognized her sobriety". The school is implementing punishment above and beyond the law here like a bunch of god damned idiots because somehow the rules have gone and scooped out their brains.

its not a legal thing, its about sneaking her friend out to avoid police detection

 

In that situation you would be aiding in committing a felony. The girl in the article wasn't aiding in getting her friend drunk, she just drove her home. 

you're right, it wasn't a felony, she just got caught helping her friend to avoid suspension.



#24 articuno1au

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:05

More to the point, being high and robbing a place are both criminal offences.

 

The drunk girl in this story didn't commit an offence that has accessory implications, she merely breached guidelines that weren't even related to her (the sport team handbook), which resulted in the friend picking her up getting done for it.

i gave my buddy a ride home from the bank once. He was drunk, high, and just robbed the place. But why should I be punished? All i did was drive him.... /s

^ This, is ****ing stupid, and completely unrelated..



#25 zhangm

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:07

its not a legal thing, its about sneaking her friend out to avoid police detection


Under the law, the driver in this case is absolved of any responsibility. Quite frankly, legally it is irrelevant what you've deemed the situation to be. If you're somehow uncertain, maybe you should like to defer to the police opinion, which "recognized her sobriety".

#26 Thrackerzod

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:09

you're right, it wasn't a felony, she just got caught helping her friend to avoid suspension.

 

Nonsense, did you miss the part where she arrived at the same time as the police? She didn't go there to sneak her friend home, she went to give a friend who had been drinking a ride. Ever hear of "friends don't let friends drive drunk"? They only detained her because they thought she was part of the party attendees who had been drinking, and they let her go because she'd done nothing wrong. The school should be commending her instead of punishing her.



#27 rippleman

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:42

More to the point, being high and robbing a place are both criminal offences.

 

The drunk girl in this story didn't commit an offence that has accessory implications, she merely breached guidelines that weren't even related to her (the sport team handbook), which resulted in the friend picking her up getting done for it.

^ This, is ****ing stupid, and completely unrelated..

i was saying it so people could see the parallels of action/consequence... some don't seem to see them very easily.

 

Nonsense, did you miss the part where she arrived at the same time as the police? She didn't go there to sneak her friend home, she went to give a friend who had been drinking a ride. Ever hear of "friends don't let friends drive drunk"? They only detained her because they thought she was part of the party attendees who had been drinking, and they let her go because she'd done nothing wrong. The school should be commending her instead of punishing her.

i did see that part, and more. she arrived same time but left with the friend before police could identify the underage drunk person (her friend). The girl did do the right thing by not letting her freind drive drunk, but that's just a smoke screen for the real reason and why the school is punishing her.



#28 Gio Takahashi

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:32

While it sucks that the school was stupid she should get over it.  In the real world no one is going to give to ****s whether you were captain of a high school volleyball team or not.

 

You also have to consider things like this look GOOD on college applications, especially if she's going for a major college. Having a record that she was suspended from Captain and games looks REALLY bad, especially if it's related to drug/alcohol, despite the fact that she was sober, and only doing the right thing.



#29 +zhiVago

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:38

She ended up in the wrong place, at the wrong time. And no good deed goes unpunished.



#30 mudslag

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:46

she aided her friend to escape detection/punishment

 

 

 

 

Cox, an honor student and volleyball star, received a cell phone message from an intoxicated friend asking for a ride home from a party earlier this month, according to the Boston Herald. However, Cox arrived at the party at the same time as the police, who were arresting a slew of students for underage drinking.

 

 

Unless you have some additional info, the article makes it seem as if she got the call before police got there and got there at the same time as the police. So from her perspective it would seem ALL she was doing was helping a friend get home. Not the whole "she's playing the getaway driver mentality" as you are trying to make it seem. You can play the assumption game but that's all you're doing.