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riahc3

Developing in Linux for Linux....

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Hello,

Im currently developing in Windows for a Linux OS (all 32 bit) but Ive thought to myself: Why not develop in Linux itself?

Im going to make a virtual machine (VirtualBox) but use a Shared Folder so I dont have to move/copy folders/files. Ill problably just share all of C:

Anyways, thats another topic. What I want to do is know development side what walls Im going to hit.

I use MyEclipse for Spring, Sublime Text 2, Notepad++, Photoshop, all web browsers, Java, TomCat, MySQL, PuTTY, FileZilla, and OpenVPN for development related purposes.

I believe that is all. First, what distro should I use? Besides easy to manage, has to be lightweight as this will run on a virtual machine.

Thank you

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I'd go with debian 7/.2

I thought the same as you, however the development tools on windows won out, and I had to do a lot more hacks and such to get the code to work on Windows than linux.  So what I do now is write all code on Windows, and just port it and recompile on linux.

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Hello,

I'd go with debian 7/.2

I thought the same as you, however the development tools on windows won out, and I had to do a lot more hacks and such to get the code to work on Windows than linux.  So what I do now is write all code on Windows, and just port it and recompile on linux.

What was your target? Windows or Linux? My target is Linux but its actually Java so........doesnt really matter much.

Its to get used to deving in Linux as well...

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Hello,

What was your target? Windows or Linux? My target is Linux but its actually Java so........doesnt really matter much.

Its to get used to deving in Linux as well...

 

Target is multi platform.  Using C++/SDL.  I did all C++ using Gedit and had command open to be able to run make and it worked well.. but I found it tedious to find issues.. whereas Visual Studio would tell me straight up.  And things that would compile 100% with gcc would fail on windows.

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Hello,

Target is multi platform.  Using C++/SDL.  I did all C++ using Gedit and had command open to be able to run make and it worked well.. but I found it tedious to find issues.. whereas Visual Studio would tell me straight up.  And things that would compile 100% with gcc would fail on windows.

C++ and VS?

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Hello,

C++ and VS?

I know it's different than Java, however that may have a nice ide on Linux.  Plus if you need to get to know the file system.   However as Java is platform independant (will have the same sets of libraries) the code should be pretty close to 1:1 windows/linux

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Hello,

I know it's different than Java, however that may have a nice ide on Linux.  Plus if you need to get to know the file system.   However as Java is platform independant (will have the same sets of libraries) the code should be pretty close to 1:1 windows/linux

What I ment is developing C++ with Visual Studio I havent heard in years!

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Hello,

What I ment is developing C++ with Visual Studio I havent heard in years!

Really? I dunno Visual Studio 2010 makes C++/C# development a breeze.   The intellisense is better for C# (as are the error messages) but it's a great environment.

Though as I say.. Debian 7 is what I use linux wise.

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Hello,

What I ment is developing C++ with Visual Studio I havent heard in years!

C++ on VS is actually back in a big way now that people are wanting to write multiplatform apps, errr or games :D

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I use MyEclipse for Spring, Sublime Text 2, Notepad++, Photoshop, all web browsers, Java, TomCat, MySQL, PuTTY, FileZilla, and OpenVPN for development related purposes.

Other than Notepad++, Photoshop and IE, everything else on your list are available in Linux.

Oh and Putty = ssh from terminal.

 

And I vote for Debian as well. Some of its packages may not be the bleeding edge version, but it's stable as hell.

If you pick the stable release, of course. There's also testing (which is somewhat stable, I've never had any issues) and unstable :)

http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/

http://www.debian.org/releases/testing/

http://www.debian.org/releases/unstable/

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Hello,

Really? I dunno Visual Studio 2010 makes C++/C# development a breeze.   The intellisense is better for C# (as are the error messages) but it's a great environment.

Though as I say.. Debian 7 is what I use linux wise.

But AFAIK, its not standard C++. MS's version right?

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Hello,

Other than Notepad++, Photoshop and IE, everything else on your list are available in Linux.

Oh and Putty = ssh from terminal.

 

And I vote for Debian as well. Some of its packages may not be the bleeding edge version, but it's stable as hell.

If you pick the stable release, of course. There's also testing (which is somewhat stable, I've never had any issues) and unstable :)

http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/

http://www.debian.org/releases/testing/

http://www.debian.org/releases/unstable/

I accept WINE. I know Notepad++ can run on WINE.

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There are more than enough native editors for Linux. No need to use Notepad++ in WINE.

As for your original question: what are you coding - command line programs? GUI programs? If the latter, which toolkit are they using? There are various possible dev environments you can use depending on your needs.

Also Fedora > Debian. :shifty:

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Hello,

There are more than enough native editors for Linux. No need to use Notepad++ in WINE.

Such as?

As for your original question: what are you coding - command line programs? GUI programs? If the latter, which toolkit are they using? There are various possible dev environments you can use depending on your needs.

Also Fedora > Debian. :shifty:

Im coding Tomcat's web services, basically. Command line. Nothing huge.

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Good editors on Linux: gedit (part of GNOME), kate (part of KDE), hell, even emacs.

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Hello,

Good editors on Linux: gedit (part of GNOME), kate (part of KDE), hell, even emacs.

Why would I use those editors instead of editors Im used to thru WINE?

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WINE only adds more bloat. Unnecessary bloat in this case. If I were you I'd rather configure one of the native Linux editors to my liking.

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Hello,

Why would I use those editors instead of editors Im used to thru WINE?

 

Out of interest, what do you do in Notepad++ that you can't do in Sublime Text which has a native Linux build?

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Hello,

WINE only adds more bloat. Unnecessary bloat in this case. If I were you I'd rather configure one of the native Linux editors to my liking.

Bloat? Wine visually simply adds a menu AFAIK. There are no visible changes. Has Wine changed a lot or something?

Out of interest, what do you do in Notepad++ that you can't do in Sublime Text which has a native Linux build?

Nowadays, I just Sublime Text 2 instead of Notepad++ but sometimes I use Notepad++ for some text editing that I dont like in Sublime Text 2 for some reason.

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Hello,

But AFAIK, its not standard C++. MS's version right?

Visual Studio can compile C++ (the regular standards defined one), C++/CLI (Managed C++ running on .NET) and C++/CX (The new metro one).

 

Hello,

Such as?

 

I just use Sublime when I'm on a linux system.

 

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Just tossing this out there as an option since you're working with Java, JetBrain's IntelliJ is a pretty nice IDE to work with too.  Commercial but there's a free community version as well (watered down of course), it supports a bunch of things besides Java (Python, Ruby, all the major JVM languages, etc), has Windows, OSX and *Nix builds, etc. Just my own opinion but preferred it to Eclipse, just seemed more stable for me, never mind "smoother" to use and overall more productive.

http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/features/index.html

 

Would sorely love to see Notepad++ ported over to *Nix one of these days though for an all purpose editor.

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Hello,

Bloat? Wine visually simply adds a menu AFAIK. There are no visible changes. Has Wine changed a lot or something?

WINE is another software layer - it provides an emulation of the Windows API. How else would Windows apps work on Linux?

 

The additional layer uses additional resources you don't really need to waste just for an editor.

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WINE is another software layer - it provides an emulation of the Windows API. How else would Windows apps work on Linux?

It's not an emulator.  It's even in the name.  (Linux sure loves those recursive acronyms.)  It just brings in the various libraries like any other dependency.

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Hello,

Just tossing this out there as an option since you're working with Java, JetBrain's IntelliJ is a pretty nice IDE to work with too.

I dislike Java as a whole :p and IntelliJ and Netbeans really just appear horrible to me.

 

 

WINE is another software layer - it provides an emulation of the Windows API. How else would Windows apps work on Linux?

 

The additional layer uses additional resources you don't really need to waste just for an editor.

AFAIK, Wine doesnt run in the background or anything. Just uses compatible libraries for Windows programs. It doesnt take resources up.

Also, the ammount of resources it takes up is so small it is not noticable.

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I dislike Java as a whole :p and IntelliJ and Netbeans really just appear horrible to me.

Not a fan myself (Scala is growing on me though), just going by your first post (Tomcat, Java, etc), although the portability is quite appealing.  That said the IDE itself is actually pretty solid, I use their fork-of-sorts PyCharm (based on IntelliJ) for Python stuff, for that at least it's miles ahead of Eclipse's PyDev.  And ugh not a fan of NetBeans either.

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