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Falcon 9 v1.1 - Dragon SPX-3/CRS-3


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#1 DocM

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 05:39

Currently NET February 11, 2014

ISS payload mass: 1,580kg (3,476lb)

Payloads: 1 GLACIER and 2 MERLIN freezers for experiment samples, Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS), the High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) camera, the KickSat CubeSat - which will deploy 250 (!!) KickSat Sprite picosatellites, plus incidentals and consumables.

This will also be the next Falcon 9 v1.1 to attempt landing the first stage after main engine cut-off (MECO) and stage separation. This is a major step towards manufacturing a reusable launcher, which will drastically lower launch costs.

If landing legs are available they are working with KSC for a place to make a land touchdown and with the FAA for permits.

If no legs are available it'll attempt another touchdown at sea, similar to the CASSIOPE launch.


#2 OP DocM

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 16:12

The KickSat cubesat started out as a Kickstarter project that succeeded. The first gen Sprite satellites are about the size of a cracker and are sold as development kits for ~$200+. Time should apply Moore's Law to their capabilities, and IMO the concept begs to be upscaled.

KickSat (each slot houses a Sprite & deployer)
KickSat.png

KickSat Sprite
Sprite_Labeled.jpg

#3 SarK0Y

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 21:14

 

This will also be the next Falcon 9 v1.1 to attempt landing the first stage after main engine cut-off (MECO) and stage separation. This is a major step towards manufacturing a reusable launcher, which will drastically lower launch costs.

such a mantra :) it'd be great, for 1st times, to increase payload mass up to reasonable numbers + meet the dates to launch w/ no terrific plague of delays.



#4 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:31

NASA TV coverage of Dragons arrival at ISS. All times are EDT.

http://www.nasa.gov/

http://mobile.nasa.gov

April 20, Sunday

5:45 a.m. - Coverage of the Rendezvous and Grapple of the SpaceX/Dragon Cargo Craft at the ISS (Grapple scheduled at 7:14 a.m. ET) - JSC (All Channels)

9:30 a.m. - Coverage of the Installation of the SpaceX/Dragon Cargo Craft on the ISS (Installation scheduled to begin at appx. 9:45 a.m. ET) - JSC (All Channels)

#5 SarK0Y

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 04:19

if no secret, what was the velocity of stage to impact onto water?



#6 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 04:54

0 m/s. Soft landing except for high waves. Avionics and telemetry kept broadcasting until it tipped horizontal.

The USAV General Frank S. Besson (US Army logistics ship) departed Port Canaveral several hours ago heading E-NE at 11 kt, a heading towards the recovery zone. The Besson can only do 12.5 kt light, 11.5 kt heavy.

ISTM they're in a big hurry in the direction of the recovery zone. Too many floating ITAR-sensitive goodies to leave floating once those seas settle, and the smaller ships weren't able to get to it. Or it could be a coincidence.

#7 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 09:05

Dragon is ahead of schedule!

MCC-Houston to ISS: Dragon range 600 meters

ISS: Dragon in sight

:ninja:

#8 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 13:37

GRAPPLE



#9 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 14:11

Berthing complete at 10:06 EDT

#10 cropcircles

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 14:43

That was really amazing to watch the capture. I was wondering how that was done. Is there another capture procedure video that shows a more secure connection between Space X and the space station ?  How do they exchange cargo.  



#11 OP DocM

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 15:09

Dragon has a GNC** bay door on one side that opens and latches. On this door is a grapple post with a knob at the end.

** (Guidance, Navigation, and Control)

On the station side is the robotic arm, which has a grapple fixture at the end. This is essentially a can with 3 cables in it, wrapped around its inside perimiter.

The grapple fixture is placed over the GNC door post, then the cables are wrapped & tightened around the post making the hard connection. Because of how the cables are wrapped it's self-centering,

GNC door & post
dragon-gnc-bay.jpg

Grapple fixture cable motions
OV%20RMS%2004.jpg

Grapple fixture photo
OV%20RMS%20effecteur.jpg

After the Dragon is berthed to ISS, essentially they're screwed together using electrically driven bolts, a 50 inch / 127 cm hatch is opened and pressurized cargo transferred.

Unpressurized cargo in the external trunk is removed by the robotic arm, again using the grapple adapter and posts on each item.

Koichi Wakata ‏@Astro_Wakata
Space-X Dragon spacecraft arrived on the ISS. Congratulations to the entire team on the successful operation.



#12 flyingskippy

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 20:56

Last I heard, the first stage was reported floating partly submerged about 200 miles off shore Savannah, GA. Size reported was 150 ft long by 12 ft wide. The Coast Guard has been issuing Marine Information Broadcasts for it since yesterday morning. I checked the marinetraffic.com site, but maybe the USAV has encrypted AIS.

#13 OP DocM

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 22:33

Where'd you hear that? PM if necessary.

#14 OP DocM

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 00:44

Dunno if she's talking part of the pics or part of the Falcon 9. After the sea landing it spent at least a day in 20 foot seas.

http://www.spaceflig...tting-ceremony/

Space Exploration Technologies’ (SpaceX) President and Chief Executive Officer Gwynne Shotwell answered the question that is on many a space enthusiasts minds this week – what happened in terms of the company’s efforts to recover the first stage of the Falcon 9 v1.1 booster that launched on Friday April 18 at 3:25 p.m. EDT (1825 GMT).
>
>
Johnson: Have you found it yet?

Shotwell: “Yes, we’ve found it.”

Johnson: Can you tell us what you found?

Shotwell: Not at this time, I haven’t seen all the photos. We’ve seen parts (laughs)!”

Johnson: Is there going to be video or photos released?

Shotwell: “I think we have some video. We didn’t have any real-time telemetry and video, so I haven’t seen it yet, I haven’t been back in the office.”



#15 OP DocM

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 21:53

NAVAREA IV 274/14 [1 of 1][[WWNWSFOLDER]]

WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
1. 150 FOOT LONG ROCKET BOOSTER ADRIFT VICINITY
31-00N 076-00W. REPORTS TO U.S. COAST GUARD MIAMI

The US Army logistics ship Besson (LSV1) left port steaming at 11 knots. Its only capable of 11.5 kt heavy, 12.5 kt light, so it's in a hurry.

http://www.marinetra.../mmsi:368766000

Track
ane2ynet.jpg