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Repairing an Old Sabertooth X58 Motherboard


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#1 Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 16:00

The motherboard I bought as a replacement to the old Sabertooth X58 motherboard recently bit the dust. It does not beep, post and there is no video output; clearing the cmos did not fix this, both the cpu and dram led stays lit. In order to use my system I transferred the cpu and ram to the old motherboard. Problem is this motherboard is plagued by power issues; my system will constantly shut down, there is trouble powering external usb hard drives. Sometimes power draw causes a shut down such as when I go to listen to music, watch a video or play a game stored on my computer. Sometimes the cmos settings, date and time will reset when power is disconnected even if only briefly. Most times the system will power cycle at least twice before finally posting and booting into an operating system. I would like to be able to locate and fix the problem myself as I do not have the money to replace the motherboard but I am not sure what to look for. This Sabertooth X58 does not use standard capacitors so there is no bulging capacitors. My guess is if I am lucky it may be a loose or broken solder joint. What should I be looking for; is it possible for me to fix on my own? I am not sure if Asus will honor the warranty on the other board because I accidentally scraped/scratched the back of the board trying to remove jammed motherboard standoffs. Thanks for any assistance so I can resolve this issue.




#2 +Mindovermaster

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 16:53

Ever try swapping the PSU? Might not be the board that kicked the bucket. See any broken capacitors?



#3 OP Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 18:12

When I last used this board it was the board that was bad. When I had enough to replace the old board with a new board my system ran flawlessly for over a year until it kicked the bucket last week. I already rma'd the psu then when the issue persisted I bought a new motherboard which resolved the issue I was experiencing. Since I don't have any money to replace the board again I am looking to repair whatever is wrong with the old board. As I said the Sabertooth X58 doesn't use standard capacitors so there would be no bulging to determine a bad capacitor as the cause if the capacitors on this thing can even fail.



#4 OP Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 20:51

Does anyone have any suggestions regarding how to fix this board? I don't have enough money to buy a new board especially since I just moved, am now completely independant and have bills to worry about.



#5 +goretsky

goretsky

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:35

Hello,

 

I'd suggest trying to RMA the motherboard with ASUS--even if it is out of warranty, they might still repair it for free, or at least a nominal fee.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

 

 

 



#6 OP Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 17:27

According to what I read somewhere last nigt Asus RMA is subpar. If it isn't covered under warranty (warranty voided) I would need to pay over $100 for them to repair the board. I just bought a soldering iron and solder to fix my other Sabertooth X58 and have a few questions before I proceed. I presume the issue to be a broken or loose solder joint, the way the board is acting suggests that may be the culprit. I am wondering about the following:

 

- How to locate a broken solder joint, what to look for?

- Do I need to melt new solder onto the circuit or melt the existing solder to secure the connection?

 

I haven't really had much practice outside of soldering practice circuits in an electronics class years back. Any tips and suggestions are appreciated to minimize any chances of something going wrong.



#7 OP Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 19:52

I think I know why my board failed a month back. A while ago I accidentally got a tiny bit of thermal paste on the cpu pins. Since it wasn't a lot an for fear of bending or breaking the pins I put the system back together. For a while it worked fine, then it recently failed a month back.

 

I may be able to get the board working again but something else is concerning me. When I was trying to loosen the heatsink from the cpu as well as some jammed standoffs I scraped the back of the pcb exposing some copper. I read somewhere to cover it up with nail polish so it don't corrode but it should still work fine so long as the copper traces weren't broken. I found some nail polish to cover the traces with, however at first I didn't realize the nail polish had specs of glitter in it. Now I am trying to find out if the glitter in the nail polish is conductive so I can get everything back together to see if it works. So far I haven't been able to find any information regarding conductivity of glitter in nail polish.



#8 este

este

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 19:58

Asus RMA is not that bad. I deal with them all of the time. Like the other poster said, I would give that a shot and find out what they can do for you.
Also how do you know it is not a power supply issue?
 



#9 OP Xtreme2damax

Xtreme2damax

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 20:04

I'm back to trying to fix the old board. Power supply was replaced before and issues with the old board persisted, replaced the board and the issues went away until now. I had put the computer into sleep mode, went to visit my parents for a few minutes and when I returned the system was dead. All that is does when I power it on is well nothing at all, both the cpu and dram led's are lit, no beeps or post.

 

What I am trying to find out is if nail polish with glitter is conductive or not. If I can get the board working I don't have to worry about rma'ing it, I'll be able to use the system and put money aside to purchase a Haswell cpu and new motherboard.



#10 Astra.Xtreme

Astra.Xtreme

    Electrical Engineer

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 20:20

Typically the reflective bits in glitter are some sort of metallic material (aluminum, iron, gold, silver, titanium, etc), but I can't say for certain that's what they put in nail polish.  It could very well be tiny bits of plastic.

 

To be safe, you might as well remove the stuff you put on using nail polish remover or paint thinner and reapply some non-glittery stuff.



#11 +goretsky

goretsky

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 07:36

Hello,

One thing to keep in mind is that if you do alter the motherboard to try and repair it yourself, ASUS will either return it to you saying they won't repair it, or charge you to repair what is (to them) clearly customer-inflicted damage.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

#12 +LogicalApex

LogicalApex

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 17:37

I understand I am resurrecting an old thread, but why didn't you just RMA the X58 with Asus? The Sabertooth has a 5 year warranty so it should still be under warranty...





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