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Lawyers acting for a Libyan politician who accuses MI6 and the CIA of secretly sending him and his pregnant wife to be tortured by Muammar Gaddafi will on Monday fight a British government attempt to prevent those responsible from being brought to justice.

 
Abdel Hakim Belhaj and his wife Fatima, accuse the government, MI6 and the former foreign secretary Jack Straw of false imprisonment, conspiracy to cause injury, abuse of public office and negligence. Belhaj's abduction in 2004 with the help of MI6 came to light when documents were found in Tripoli after Gaddafi's fall two years ago.
 
They revealed that MI6's Sir Mark Allen congratulated the Libyan intelligence chief Moussa Koussa on the safe arrival of the "air cargo", and noted that "the intelligence [on Belhaj] was British".
 
The government is expected to argue that the case should be thrown out because it would damage UK relations with the US. It is also expected to argue that the case is beyond the jurisdiction of British courts given that the alleged unlawful acts took place with the help of other states, notably the US and Libya.
 
Government lawyers have indicated that if necessary they will seek to have the case heard in secret courts set up this year by the Justice and Security Act.

Source: The Guardian

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Just because the intel was British it doesn't; follow that they collected it, or him. The statement could have been a diplomatic "atta boy."

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Just because the intel was British it doesn't; follow that they collected it, or him. The statement could have been a diplomatic "atta boy."

Absolutely, but the implication is that British intelligence was involved and it is well known that the UK supported the flying of prisoners under the CIA's extraordinary rendition programme. It's very dangerous for the government to dismiss accusations of criminality on the basis that it might harm the country's relationship with the United States, especially if that relationship is actively supporting the violation of international law.

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