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Nostalgia question: Cyrix processors


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#16 +Phouchg

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:44

Is it, though? I mean, a used phone could be hacked to be about as useful, and probably smaller.

I think it is. One doesn't have even to hack it, it runs x86-64 and with it most desktop OS (including Windows, which is important) with no limitations and supports SSDs with their insane speed. If it was going for $100-$150 or so, it probably would have been a big deal and would be standing side by side with Intel's NUC and Gigabyte's Brix.




#17 n_K

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:01

Yeah they're now VIA low power chips, which are x86 instruction set compatible. Performance wise they're nothing compared to intel but they're much more power efficient for their performance than the intel lineup and are intended for the embedded market, some VIA chips don't need heatsinks or fans for instance.



#18 +Phouchg

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:09

Performance-wise I often wonder where exactly is the border area of where processing speed becomes a problem and I/O speed gives up. I've been putting together G-series Celerons and with any SSD they're still flying. Same goes for absolutely crappy plastic low-end laptops. Upgraded with any SSD (60 GB is real cheap, especially if you can trade in that 500 GB HDD that comes originally). For simple home and office use I actually see why the usual desktop just doesn't seem a good option. Mechanical HDDs are holding us back.



#19 HawkMan

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:09

Yeah they're now VIA low power chips, which are x86 instruction set compatible. Performance wise they're nothing compared to intel but they're much more power efficient for their performance than the intel lineup and are intended for the embedded market, some VIA chips don't need heatsinks or fans for instance.

 

cough atom cough



#20 threetonesun

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 13:56

I think it is. One doesn't have even to hack it, it runs x86-64 and with it most desktop OS (including Windows, which is important) with no limitations and supports SSDs with their insane speed. If it was going for $100-$150 or so, it probably would have been a big deal and would be standing side by side with Intel's NUC and Gigabyte's Brix.

 

I suppose. I think the bigger issue is at what point do you really need a system that small and are willing to compromise. I mean, you could fit a Mac Mini in a car and use it as a car PC, it's not much bigger and it's a fully functioning PC. Smaller than that, you probably really want a chip that is disposable, or you want something all in one. Or you just split the usage, with something like a home server and then really small, really low power devices that receive the data (ala the apple TV or similar devices).

 

Don't get me wrong, I think it's cool that we can have fully functioning PCs at that size and price, but I'm not sure that they're a best solution for anything yet.



#21 Arceles

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 14:05

It actually gets better... http://www.viaembedd.../EPIA-P910.html epia-p910-1.jpg



#22 Xerino

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 21:00

I think back in the late 90's AMD used VIa chipsets. I did catch hell at times because of this.

Everyone who used the VIA chipset back in the day got a lecture.. whether it was an intel or AMD cpu, if you used it in a VIA motherboard, prepare to recieve hell!!!

 

I had a Cyrix 686 166mhz back in the day



#23 n_K

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 21:05

cough atom cough

There is atom, but embedded devices tend to go for VIA chips over intel if they use low power and speed, not really sure why.



#24 spudtrooper

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 21:09

There is atom, but embedded devices tend to go for VIA chips over intel if they use low power and speed, not really sure why.

 

Via will engineer for specific configurations, Intel engineers for mass production. 



#25 Aergan

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 21:19

My first non-486 CPU based PC was Cyrix with a VIA based motherboard. I believe it just about ran Windows 95... in 16 colours. Was not fond memories - thankfully AMD's K5 came to the rescue.



#26 +warwagon

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 21:25

@ Warwagon, you could've gone out for a burger and some fries and come back with time to spare (was that you in the video?)

 

That was not me in the video .You should go watch some of my videos, then you would know what I sound like :)

 

http://www.youtube.c...countrycomputer



#27 leesmithg

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 06:11

Did you ever come across issues trying to get systems to work with Windows 98SE and dare I mention WinME?tomato.gif

 

@ Warwagon, you could've gone out for a burger and some fries and come back with time to spare (was that you in the video?)

 

I first used a cyrix on Windows 95, not a problem, then Win98 then I had the Win98 SE upgrade disk, so when Win98SE, not a problem.

 

I did use WindowsME the day it was released, but don't remember if I had any problems.

 

Next operating system I used was XP and I had built a new PC; this time I used an intel.

 

So not really had any problems with Cyrix on operating systems you mentioned.

 

I have a buddy that works on the VIA x86 cpus, they're still alive and well making chips with x86 instructions for specific markets. It's done by CenTaur technology here in Austin and its a great bunch of guys.

 

Even with all the quirks of the Cyrix/Via CPU's, they did achieve their goal of helping break the price barrier of PC's and showed what smaller 3rd party companies could achieve by licensing IP.

 

Exactly, they helped make PC's more affordable for poorer people.



#28 HawkMan

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 06:44

Exactly, they helped make PC's more affordable for poorer people.


While this is partly true, it's very exaggparated and potentially misleading or even wrong. It completely ignores that there was a second player in the intel compatible market working to reduce prices. This second player was much bigger than Cyrix, much more successfull, had far better performance, and generally better reliability(provided the mono didn't have a chip that said VIA on it anyway) and this second player is still around today in the market.

This is of course AMD. Cyrix with its minuscule market and low performance didn't offer much in the way of threat to intel. And intels prices didn't really reduce compared to the market until after Cyrix was pushed out and AMD offered their talon CPUs with better performance than Intel at lower prices and we started getting more chipset makers and AMDs own chipsets started being released for the general public with far better stability as well.

#29 Torolol

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:02

i really dislike intel when Cyrix was around,

simply because intel was trying to chase Cyrix out of market using legal suits.

 

Though Cyrix won most of the court battles, those however depleted their resources too much.



#30 Tralalak

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 22:43

History

 

In 1999, VIA acquired most of Cyrix (CPUID: "CyrixInstead"), then a division of National Semiconductor and also Integrated Device Technology from Centaur Technology (CPUID: "CentaurHauls"), marking its entry into the x86 microprocessor market.

 

 

 

Present

 

 

Embedded Vertical Markets

 

 

via_epia_m920.jpg

My VIA EPIA M920-12Q Mini-ITX

 

 

via_epia_m920_-_porty.jpg

My VIA EPIA M920-12Q - I/O ports

 

 

via_qc_l4700_hwinfo64.jpg
 

 

 

 

With VIA QuadCore you can play many games

 

 

source: http://www.youtube.c...k?feature=watch

source: http://diit.cz/clane...nebench-pov-ray

source: http://diit.cz/clane...via-vx11h-vx900

 

 

 

Consumer horizontal market SOHO (Small office/home office)

 

 

 

 

 

Future Centaur/VIA "(Cyrix)" team 

 

Maybe this year yet: native and monolithic (single-die) VIA QuadCore CN-R with new 2MB L3 cache, SIMD up to AVX2 and 28nm lithography.

 

source: http://www.h-online....ts-1742927.html

Hypothetical - maybe next year: "VIA 8-Core CN-R processor" models comprise may be two dies, each containing quad cores (VIA QuadCore CN-R), packaged in a multi-chip module (MCM)...