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Posted

TItle Updated, I wonder when MS will actually allow Modern UI stuff to run without UAC enabled


Never. You can't even disable UAC in Windows 8.

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Posted

snip

No problem. I should have mentioned Bluestacks from the beginning. The reason I used Halo 2 was because it's an actual case where MS didn't support an older OS to (very likely) push sales of the new one.

 

Anyway, I think this conversation has run its course.

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Posted

Hello,
Its not for security reasons. Its problably because it can be exploited some way that Microsoft doesnt want.

If there is no workaround. then its back to Windows 7 for me :)

 

Actually no. It just wasn't technically possible to run modern apps on the legacy admin account. The built-in Administrator account is basically deprecated. No one should ever use it for any reason, ever. It isn't tested or maintained. It isn't capable of creating an AppContainer, and thus it was not possible to run modern apps as the entire apparatus around them is built upon the assumption that they run in one.

 

There is absolutely no reason for anyone to use that account on a modern version of Windows.

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Posted

Actually, it's MS restricting the store to W8.

 

The inability to run modern apps there was not a policy decision in any way. It was a technical limitation. Supporting it would have been expensive for absolutely no benefit. It was actually an unfortunate expense of resources just to implement that dialog explaining why they don't work (for all of three people to see).

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Posted

Actually no. It just wasn't technically possible to run modern apps on the legacy admin account. The built-in Administrator account is basically deprecated. No one should ever use it for any reason, ever. It isn't tested or maintained. It isn't capable of creating an AppContainer, and thus it was not possible to run modern apps as the entire apparatus around them is built upon the assumption that they run in one.

There is absolutely no reason for anyone to use that account on a modern version of Windows.


How is it deprecated and not maintained? Windows server 2012 boots into the built-in admin account, no?

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Posted

Hello,

This thread can be closed. Like I mentioned, I found a fix for it on that page:

You might have encountered with this strange and annoying error. This app can

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Posted

Hello,

This thread can be closed. Like I mentioned, I found a fix for it on that page:
 

 

You realize that's just changing the Administrator account so that it functions like any other account... right? And doing it in a totally unsupported and probably somehow broken way? Wouldn't it be far easier (and safer + supported) to just make a regular admin account? (and name it Admin if you want?)

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Posted

How is it deprecated and not maintained? Windows server 2012 boots into the built-in admin account, no?

 

I don't think so, but then I haven't used Server in a while. I was talking about client, though I'd be very surprised if that were the case.

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Posted

I don't think so, but then I haven't used Server in a while. I was talking about client, though I'd be very surprised if that were the case.


I own and use Windows Server 2012. By default, it boots to a built-in admin account. (I don't know if it is THAT admin account.) But I DO notice one thing. On the default Windows server account, I CANNOT launch metro apps. I have to create a new account and log in to that to run metro apps. Most people don't notice it because no metro apps are enabled by default. You have to manually install Windows store and enable PC settings app. But when you do, they won't open on the default account.

I will also mention one more thing. When you first install WS2012, you are first asked to change you password. You never create an account. It is labeled as "Administrator" and you are forced to "Change" you password. This implies that the account already exists, meaning it must be a built in account call Administrator (spelled exactly).

Here's a picture of the WS2012 logon screen: http://www.networkedminds.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Windows-Server-2012-Logon-Screen.png

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