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#16 Luc2k

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 19:56

Dude, you can't even RUN modern apps on Windows 7. You have LESS options in Windoes 7. At least in Windows 8, you can run Windows 7 apps and if you ever need to you have the OPTION of running Windows 8 apps. Windows 7 has no OPTIONS. Windows 7 gives you NO CHOICE.

So you are saying, because Windows 8 is restricting, you will go back to Windows 7 which is even MORE limited? That doesn't make much sense. :s

Actually, it's MS restricting the store to W8. Then again, what kind of enthusiast would run "modern apps" when you can use full-fledged programs on anything that doesn't use touch-input.




#17 Nazmus Shakib Khandaker

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 04:38

Actually, it's MS restricting the store to W8. Then again, what kind of enthusiast would run "modern apps" when you can use full-fledged programs on anything that doesn't use touch-input.


No, it's technologically impossible for win7 to run modern apps. Win 7 has no capabilities to run those apps.

#18 Luc2k

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:04

No, it's technologically impossible for win7 to run modern apps. Win 7 has no capabilities to run those apps.

Sure it is, just like it was impossible to run Halo 2 in XP :rolleyes:.



#19 Nazmus Shakib Khandaker

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 19:51

Sure it is, just like it was impossible to run Halo 2 in XP :rolleyes:.

 

 

No, Halo could have been easily ported to XP. Windows 8 modern apps are nothing like Halo 2. Windows 8 modern apps uses WinRT, which is separate from Win32, which Windows 7 uses. WinRT is a whole new OS that runs alongside Windows 8 desktop. Windows 7 doesn't have WinRT.

It is embarrassing to see that comment because it shows you you are unaware of how the technology works. It is like saying Windows 7 should be able to run android or iOS apps (without visualization). That makes no sense. Windows 7 doesn't have the code to run Android, iOS, or Windows 8 apps. That's technology. That has nothing to do with MS not wanting to bring windows 8 apps to 7.

This is the same reason why IE6 can't run HTML5 apps. It's not because MS doesn't port HTML5 apps to IE6, but it's because IE6 doesn't have what it needs to run HTML5 apps. Windows 8 modern apps are like iOS apps. They can't run on Windows 7 without visualization, which defeats the purpose.



#20 Luc2k

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 23:48

No, Halo could have been easily ported to XP. Windows 8 modern apps are nothing like Halo 2. Windows 8 modern apps uses WinRT, which is separate from Win32, which Windows 7 uses. WinRT is a whole new OS that runs alongside Windows 8 desktop. Windows 7 doesn't have WinRT.

It is embarrassing to see that comment because it shows you you are unaware of how the technology works. It is like saying Windows 7 should be able to run android or iOS apps (without visualization). That makes no sense. Windows 7 doesn't have the code to run Android, iOS, or Windows 8 apps. That's technology. That has nothing to do with MS not wanting to bring windows 8 apps to 7.

This is the same reason why IE6 can't run HTML5 apps. It's not because MS doesn't port HTML5 apps to IE6, but it's because IE6 doesn't have what it needs to run HTML5 apps. Windows 8 modern apps are like iOS apps. They can't run on Windows 7 without visualization, which defeats the purpose.

I suppose you meant to say virtualisation so there goes your comment about my technology knowledge.

 

Do point out where I said this wouldn't need virtualisation, and why would using that would defeat "the purpose"?. It has everything to do with MS wanting to phase out W7 in favour of W8. They desperately want to build an Apple-like ecosystem and W7 is in the way, going the same way as XP did.

 

Hmm, maybe you're right about "the purpose". Then again, nobody wants or needs W8 apps on W7. It's just that the fact of saying it can't be done is retarded.

 

Your comparison of W7 with IE6 is so bad I don't even...



#21 Gotenks98

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:22

How about we get the title of this thread changed to what the OP was really asking. Not having it say games since that's not really the issue but the Metro apps. I was coming to post saying all the games I have work under admin but this thread is about metro. Please change the title.



#22 Richard C.

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 08:00

TItle Updated, I wonder when MS will actually allow Modern UI stuff to run without UAC enabled



#23 Nazmus Shakib Khandaker

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 14:00

I suppose you meant to say virtualisation so there goes your comment about my technology knowledge.

Do point out where I said this wouldn't need virtualisation, and why would using that would defeat "the purpose"?. It has everything to do with MS wanting to phase out W7 in favour of W8. They desperately want to build an Apple-like ecosystem and W7 is in the way, going the same way as XP did.

Hmm, maybe you're right about "the purpose". Then again, nobody wants or needs W8 apps on W7. It's just that the fact of saying it can't be done is retarded.

Your comparison of W7 with IE6 is so bad I don't even...


Let me ask you this: what would need to be done to make windows 8 apps run on windows 7, technologically. You tell me; I want to see if you understand the technology.

#24 Luc2k

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 14:21

Let me ask you this: what would need to be done to make windows 8 apps run on windows 7, technologically. You tell me; I want to see if you understand the technology.

Same thing Bluestacks does with Android apps I'd reckon.



#25 Nazmus Shakib Khandaker

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 00:15

Same thing Bluestacks does with Android apps I'd reckon.


I am sorry I misjudged you. You do understand the technology behind this. Initially I assumed you were saying that Metro apps would simply run by double-clicking an .exe file on the Windows 7 desktop. I didn't realize that you meant virtualization, like bluestacks.

I suspected this because you mentioned halo. For halo 2, you didn't need to virtualize. All Microsoft had to do is tweak the code to work make it run on Windows XP. Halo 2 was a Win32 app like all other XP apps.

Again, I am so sorry for the misunderstanding you. Now that I know what you meant, and because this is technology possible, I see the benefit of bringing Windows 8 apps (especially the XB Live games) to Windows 7 using virtualization.

I will add one thing. Most PCs would run VMs poorly (older hardware, less ram, etc.), and the experience will be slow, especially for games. This would make it seem that Windows 8 is slow.

#26 Dot Matrix

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 00:35

TItle Updated, I wonder when MS will actually allow Modern UI stuff to run without UAC enabled


Never. You can't even disable UAC in Windows 8.

#27 Luc2k

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 06:21

snip

No problem. I should have mentioned Bluestacks from the beginning. The reason I used Halo 2 was because it's an actual case where MS didn't support an older OS to (very likely) push sales of the new one.

 

Anyway, I think this conversation has run its course.



#28 +Brandon Live

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 06:30

Hello,
Its not for security reasons. Its problably because it can be exploited some way that Microsoft doesnt want.

If there is no workaround. then its back to Windows 7 for me :)

 

Actually no. It just wasn't technically possible to run modern apps on the legacy admin account. The built-in Administrator account is basically deprecated. No one should ever use it for any reason, ever. It isn't tested or maintained. It isn't capable of creating an AppContainer, and thus it was not possible to run modern apps as the entire apparatus around them is built upon the assumption that they run in one.

 

There is absolutely no reason for anyone to use that account on a modern version of Windows.



#29 +Brandon Live

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 06:34

Actually, it's MS restricting the store to W8.

 

The inability to run modern apps there was not a policy decision in any way. It was a technical limitation. Supporting it would have been expensive for absolutely no benefit. It was actually an unfortunate expense of resources just to implement that dialog explaining why they don't work (for all of three people to see).



#30 Nazmus Shakib Khandaker

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:10

Actually no. It just wasn't technically possible to run modern apps on the legacy admin account. The built-in Administrator account is basically deprecated. No one should ever use it for any reason, ever. It isn't tested or maintained. It isn't capable of creating an AppContainer, and thus it was not possible to run modern apps as the entire apparatus around them is built upon the assumption that they run in one.

There is absolutely no reason for anyone to use that account on a modern version of Windows.


How is it deprecated and not maintained? Windows server 2012 boots into the built-in admin account, no?