Jump to content



Photo

Secret fix every experienced tech knows

tech support serious glitch windows mac blue screen internal software

  • Please log in to reply
44 replies to this topic

#31 Jack 0Neill

Jack 0Neill

    Neowinian

  • 633 posts
  • Joined: 23-October 05

Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:20


source & more fixes


Note the source. Rofl. Hardly "news" in any way.


#32 +Nik L

Nik L

    Where's my pants?

  • 34,000 posts
  • Joined: 14-January 03

Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:24

It sure is a windows thing. The way windows works, it doesn't ever allow you to fully reset everything unless you either:
1) Reboot
2) Talk the user through something that will take longer than a reboot.

#33 adrynalyne

adrynalyne

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,131 posts
  • Joined: 29-November 09

Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:26

It sure is a windows thing. The way windows works, it doesn't ever allow you to fully reset everything unless you either:
1) Reboot
2) Talk the user through something that will take longer than a reboot.

Depending on the action/update, OS X and GNU/Linux are no different.

 

Windows is a lot better than it used to be.  Remember Windows 98?  If you farted near it, it needed a reboot.



#34 Shiranui

Shiranui

    Iconoclast

  • 3,758 posts
  • Joined: 24-December 03

Posted 29 October 2013 - 04:09

rtfm.png



#35 Aheer.R.S.

Aheer.R.S.

    I cannot Teach Him, the Boy has no Patience!

  • 11,528 posts
  • Joined: 15-October 10

Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:31

Maybe we should point Blizzard server techs to this thread. :p



#36 +Boo Berry

Boo Berry

    Neowinian Ghost

  • 3,474 posts
  • Joined: 26-March 05
  • Location: United States

Posted 29 October 2013 - 21:34



#37 srbeen

srbeen

    Neowinian

  • 1,014 posts
  • Joined: 30-November 11

Posted 03 November 2013 - 13:19

well i've had all sorts of issues, even a failing server that, if rebooted the array *might* die (and the tech that requested the reboot had it's way ignoring that issue that f0cked up the array) so a reboot, while it can resolve some problems, it's not always the end solution; it can resolve but it's not always the original problem. I prefer i thorough troubleshooting, it can take time but at least you know exactly what happened or what it needs to be done (sometimes a reboot :D).

 

But when you reboot you knew 100% that its a failing array, as you have lost all your data and need to rebuild.. It may not fix the issue, but you are sure of the problem now... If you don't know what the probem is, rebooting will answer questions. If you are in a position where you know you shouldn't reboot, you likely already have the problem figured out.



#38 Anibal P

Anibal P

    Neowinian

  • 4,163 posts
  • Joined: 11-June 02
  • Location: Waterbury CT
  • OS: Win 8.1
  • Phone: Android

Posted 03 November 2013 - 13:58

Working support for a VERY large international company it still makes me giggle when getting a user to log off an app or rebooting their systems "fixes" their issue miraculously, it's also hilarious to me when step one of some of the fixes we have to perform are reboot and try again, THEN do x. It's gotten to the point that I will generally insist on a reboot before troubleshooting some issues, since that will usually fix the problem 



#39 pack34

pack34

    Professional Electron Wrangler

  • 1,003 posts
  • Joined: 04-July 11

Posted 03 November 2013 - 14:04

Reboot is a quick fix, but most of the time the problem will return. It's better to find the root of the problem and fix that so it doesn't happen again.

 

 

That depends on how long it would take to diagnose the issue versus how long it takes to reboot. If it takes a minute to reboot and the issue only comes around once every couple months then it is not worth the time to find the root cause of the issue. Unless you find yourself sitting on your thumbs all day with nothing to do. Otherwise it's a cost/benefit analysis on how much time it takes you to complete the task versus how much time you'll save in the future. 



#40 shockz

shockz

    Neowinian Senior

  • 19,604 posts
  • Joined: 09-November 01
  • Location: USA
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: iPhone 5

Posted 03 November 2013 - 20:21

That depends on how long it would take to diagnose the issue versus how long it takes to reboot. If it takes a minute to reboot and the issue only comes around once every couple months then it is not worth the time to find the root cause of the issue. Unless you find yourself sitting on your thumbs all day with nothing to do. Otherwise it's a cost/benefit analysis on how much time it takes you to complete the task versus how much time you'll save in the future. 

Disagree... the amount of time that user will continue to come to you for when the problem returns should also be calculated into the time to troubleshoot vs rebooting. There can also be paperwork or work orders that need to be filled out depending on the problem, which takes time and starts to clutter up your queue. 

 

It's probably also not a good endorsement if they complain about how you haven't fixed their issue for months now.

 

I'd rather take the time to figure out what the deal was then to have them continue to have a problem, especially a disruptive one that prevents them from doing their job.

 

People can't just reboot on the whim whenever we ask them to, especially in the middle of a meeting and their presentation randomly screws up (again) while they're the host of a webinar.

 

The reboot rule is definitely a good rule to go by in a one time pinch, but it for sure shouldn't be the golden rule to a problem where it only comes back one out of twenty times. You're not a good IS admin if you think otherwise, and not only does it make the frustrated user think you don't know how to fix their computer, but their manager and possibly yours as well. I guess I'm fortunate enough to where although I have a busy work load, I'm able to balance issues like this as the user to IS ratio is well proportioned. 



#41 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • 41,508 posts
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 04 November 2013 - 00:42

Windows is a lot better than it used to be.  Remember Windows 98?  If you farted near it, it needed a reboot.

 

Windows 95 would randomly reboot on it's on for me. Those were the days. :)



#42 adrynalyne

adrynalyne

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,131 posts
  • Joined: 29-November 09

Posted 04 November 2013 - 14:35

Windows 95 would randomly reboot on it's on for me. Those were the days. :)

It wasn't random.  It was predicting your needs :D



#43 redvamp128

redvamp128

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,925 posts
  • Joined: 06-October 01

Posted 06 November 2013 - 19:22

For issues with viruses and other things ...Reboot using live Linux Cd... rename .bak files and other files and replace originals... then also use that one to - remove the files that are causing the system to run slow

.



#44 thechronic

thechronic

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,009 posts
  • Joined: 21-July 05
  • Location: UK

Posted 06 November 2013 - 19:36

While reboots are certainly not a be all, end all, it should be the first thing anyone tries.

 

I know if someone refuses to reboot with an OS problem, I will not help them.  I only ask that they try it initially.

 

Actually, if settings, changes have been applied to the operating system that affect system start-up a reboot may effectively lock out a technician - even something as simple as the Password has been changed and since forgotten on an admin account. Just incase it is better to fully understand the issue at hand, the symptoms, the causes and then decide the best course of action not just 'reboot' regardless.



#45 +warwagon

warwagon

    Only you can prevent forest fires.

  • 25,953 posts
  • Joined: 30-November 01
  • Location: Iowa

Posted 07 November 2013 - 19:48

This is specially true for Windows 8/8.1 because of the Hibernation / shutdown hybrid that most people do nightly.