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Setting up a 3G failover on a router.


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#1 riahc3

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 14:08

Hello,

This is going to be one of those topics where I hope doesnt get complicated but problably will....

I have a ZyWall 50 USG (which was hell to configure for WAN in the first place) and now I want to configure it for a 3G fallover. We were given a 3G USB which isnt compatible so I was given another router which was compatible. This router is currently in bridge mode (192.168.0.1) so hooking it up to a PC and setting I:192.168.0.2 S: 255.255.255.0 GW: 192.168.0.1 is enough.

I wanna hook this router into the USG 50 and distribute WAN access thru my network.

Please state information missing as Ive probably forgotten something (sorry Budman)

Thank you


#2 OP riahc3

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 14:10

Hello,

My network is 192.168.100.x 255.255.255.0 192.168.100.100 (this is the usg 50 router)

Sorry

#3 OP riahc3

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 11:41

Hello,

I went ahead and set up this cheesy diagram in case noone understands (All public IPs are all false):

vzqt.png

As you can see at the top we have a router (confirming it is a NuCom NU-GAN5) with a 3G USB dongle (confirming it is a NuCom WU-260) attached to it. With this it gives a IP address with no further configuration.

Below it, is our "current" setup which is a router (ZyWALL USG 50) with establishes the PPPoE connectiong with the modem that is attached to it (this modem is also in bridge mode). This works perfectly.

What I want to do is connect the NuCom NU-GAN5 to the ZyWALL USG 50 and use the 3G connection of it, completely ignoring the PPPoE. The USG 50 has two WAN ports so if I disconnect WAN1, it should fallover to WAN2 which would be the 3G connection.

#4 +BudMan

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 13:34

"This router is currently in bridge mode (192.168.0.1) so hooking it up to a PC and setting I:192.168.0.2 S: 255.255.255.0 GW: 192.168.0.1 is enough."

What -- how is 192.168.0.2 bridge mode?? That is not bridge mode, that is a rfc1918 address, so natted from public address space if you have internet access using a 192.168.0.2 address with .0.1 as your gateway.

"(this modem is also in bridge mode)."

But then you list a 192.168.1.1 address next to it?? I am thinking you not understanding the term bridge mode ;)

So from your drawing seems like you have 2 natting routers in front of your router that hand out 192.168.0.0/24 and 192.168.1.0/24 address space - I assume the /24 since this is so common.

So your router should be able to get just dhcp from either of those for its wan addresses, and whatever that is nat it to your 192.168.100.0/?? What is the mask on your network /24 as well? If /16 you would be stepping on your 2 wan networks in your drawing.

What are you not understanding about setting up dual wan on your router? Can we see your wan configuration, do you not want to trunk them and use load balancing? If you just want failover, then one should be active and the other passive I wold think in the mode.

But I think we need to clear up either how you are stating your connections, or your actual understanding of what bridge mode means ;)

Bridge mode is when your modem/gateway does not do NAT, and provides a public IP address to what is connected to it. RFC1918 are not involved in such a setup.. So if your usg50 is getting rfc1918 on its wan, your devices in front of it are not in bridge mode.

#5 OP riahc3

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 17:43

Hello,

"This router is currently in bridge mode (192.168.0.1) so hooking it up to a PC and setting I:192.168.0.2 S: 255.255.255.0 GW: 192.168.0.1 is enough."

What -- how is 192.168.0.2 bridge mode?? That is not bridge mode, that is a rfc1918 address, so natted from public address space if you have internet access using a 192.168.0.2 address with .0.1 as your gateway.

Well the ******* guy that handed me this router basically told me its in bridge mode and left. What I understood is that the router has a private interface of 192.168.0.2 and a public of 234.145.34.23 so yes, NAT would be enabled. A good start would be to then disable NAT?
 

"(this modem is also in bridge mode)."

But then you list a 192.168.1.1 address next to it?? I am thinking you not understanding the term bridge mode ;)

Same thing. Its public interface is 110.23.45.23 but its private is 192.168.1.1

The USG 50 is connected to that modem with this configuration (its connected to WAN1) (I want to clarify that LAN2 and DMZ are not used and are not connected to anything):

cez9.png

The USG 50 also passes its PPPoE configuration.

Maybe I do not indeed understand the exact meaning of bridge mode. AFAIK, it just should pass its public IP thru.


 

So from your drawing seems like you have 2 natting routers in front of your router that hand out 192.168.0.0/24 and 192.168.1.0/24 address space - I assume the /24 since this is so common.

Both are /24 (255.255.255.0)

None of these routers are the DHCP server and have it turned off. (Its handled by another machine)

 

So your router should be able to get just dhcp from either of those for its wan addresses, and whatever that is nat it to your 192.168.100.0/?? What is the mask on your network /24 as well? If /16 you would be stepping on your 2 wan networks in your drawing.

The mask on my network is /24 There is no other
 

What are you not understanding about setting up dual wan on your router?

Well, for starters, it tooks me a while to set up ONE WAN on my router, much less two when one is PPPoE and another is 3G....
 

Can we see your wan configuration, do you not want to trunk them and use load balancing? If you just want failover, then one should be active and the other passive I wold think in the mode.

I just want failover. No load balancing :)

 

But I think we need to clear up either how you are stating your connections, or your actual understanding of what bridge mode means ;)

Any questions, go ahead and ask. Ill also give you screenshots :)
 

Bridge mode is when your modem/gateway does not do NAT, and provides a public IP address to what is connected to it. RFC1918 are not involved in such a setup.. So if your usg50 is getting rfc1918 on its wan, your devices in front of it are not in bridge mode.

Then how does the modem, with 192.168.1.1, give a public IP adress to the 192.168.100.100 which does do NAT (because if not, only one person would be able to access the internet)?

Thank you BudMan for your help, as always. Its a crime your "Tech Issues Solved" is at 26

#6 +BudMan

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 19:21

What is your trunk tab show. I believe this is where you setup active and passive connection. If the connection is set to passive then it would not be used in the load balancing mode you have setup. This is my understanding from the limited info I could find in their ###### UG ;)

You mention you have PPPoE setup in the USG, this would be how its getting a public maybe. Can you show your PPPoE tab - assuming thats what you meant by "The USG 50 also passes its PPPoE configuration."

Maybe that is your problem if you have PPPoE setup on the USG.. If your pppoe router is doing the pppoe then normally it nats. You would need something like a half bridge, where the router handles the pppoe session but hands the public IP to the device connected to it.

PPPoE can make a bit more confusing. You might want to just let your double nat happen with your pppoe device and then the device that is putting a public IP on your wan interface is working correctly.. Unless that is your PPPoE you have setup on your usg50?

In an ideal setup the 2 device in front of your usg50 would hand or statically allow you to put public IPs on your usg50 wan interfaces. Then in your trunk setup you would have one interface active and the other passive. This way if your active connection goes down your passive would become active and it would be used for your connection for all your devices natted behind your usg50.

Post up your PPPoE tab and and your trunk tab and we will try and get it straightened out.

As to crime -- hmmm, I got into a bit of conversation about reporting my posts as answer posts to some threads, so I surely am not going to go back and find all the old threads and get my posts as the answer, or yeah would prob be in the 1ks of tech issues solved vs only 26 hehehe

#7 OP riahc3

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:38

Hello,

What is your trunk tab show. I believe this is where you setup active and passive connection. If the connection is set to passive then it would not be used in the load balancing mode you have setup. This is my understanding from the limited info I could find in their ****ty UG ;)

Here is the trunk tab. I have never touched this so I have NO idea what it does:

0rdg.png


You mention you have PPPoE setup in the USG, this would be how its getting a public maybe. Can you show your PPPoE tab - assuming thats what you meant by "The USG 50 also passes its PPPoE configuration."

Maybe that is your problem if you have PPPoE setup on the USG.. If your pppoe router is doing the pppoe then normally it nats. You would need something like a half bridge, where the router handles the pppoe session but hands the public IP to the device connected to it.

PPPoE can make a bit more confusing. You might want to just let your double nat happen with your pppoe device and then the device that is putting a public IP on your wan interface is working correctly.. Unless that is your PPPoE you have setup on your usg50?

Here is my PPPoE setup:

qzx4.png

xy6h.png


In an ideal setup the 2 device in front of your usg50 would hand or statically allow you to put public IPs on your usg50 wan interfaces. Then in your trunk setup you would have one interface active and the other passive. This way if your active connection goes down your passive would become active and it would be used for your connection for all your devices natted behind your usg50.

Understood but I have never used that trunk tab so dont know really well how it works.

Thanks as always BudMan