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SpaceX Dragon 2 - testing & updates


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#1 DocM

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 05:32

With the Dragon 2 drop test, pad abort test and next year's MaxQ abort test I guess it's time for a thread.

Let's start with a real life 3D printed rocket engine firing :)

3D printed SuperDraco launch abort & landing thruster firing on a SpaceX vertical test stand. It is printed using the Inconel super-alloy. Dragon 2 will have 8 SuperDraco's arranged in pairs around its perimeter.

3DprintedSuperDraco(inconel).jpg

concept art of a Dragon landing

dragon-mars-spacex-video-still.jpg


#2 OP DocM

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 00:30

In launch abort mode Dragon will use parachutes and a water landing, the SupetDraco's (SD's) fuel being used up during the abort.

For land touchdowns they will initially test parachutes down to ~10 meters then use the SD's to land, similar to Soyuz. Later they'll test full propulsive landings without a crew first, probably during cargo flights, then after several crewed flights with propulsive.

Because there are 8 SD's in pairs and they're both massively overpowered and deeply throttleable Dragon can lose a couple of SD's and still land propulsively.

Even after full propulsive landings are standard they will retain the parachutes, which will gain a powerful low altitude mortar deployment system for backing up the SD's.

Parachutes & SD's (at the end)


Propulsive


#3 OP DocM

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 20:49

The new Dragon 2 parachute system drop test is immenent. Preps were underway today.

This test article is a refurb of the original 2010 Dragon parachute testbed. Mainly added the new, more powerful parachute system and ballast to simulate the greater mass of Dragon 2.

2013DragonChuteTest.jpg

#4 OP DocM

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 02:25


http://www.ksby.com/...t-in-morro-bay/

As if the skies themselves haven't been spectacular enough the last day or so, anyone looking upward in Morro Bay today saw quite a show: an Erickson Air Crane carrying a spacecraft out over the bay to the Pacific.

As part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, Space X and NASA are working together to modify Space-X's Dragon spacecraft for human space flight. They were hoping to test how the spacecraft's parachutes deploy and how the spacecraft lands today, but ended up bringing the module back to the Dynegy plant for another attempt later in the day or tomorrow. Similar tests were conducted in Morro Bay back in August of 2010.

The Dragon spacecraft being carried over Morro Bay today is currently delivering cargo to and from the International Space Station for NASA. The tests being conducted will help NASA and Space X make any modifications necessary to have the Dragon start fliying astronauts and other crew members as early as 2015.

Space X says Morro Bay is an ideal location for this type of test and the support of the community makes it even better. The testing process is happening out of the Dynegy power plant with the support of the Morro Bay Police Department, Morro Bay Fire, the U.S. Coast Guard, the FAA and the Morro Bay Planning Department.

See video of today's first testing attempt on KSBY at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. To see video from previous test in Morro Bay in 2010, click here.


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#5 Shiranui

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 05:47

The need to send out a whole bunch of landers to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn.

#6 Beittil

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:42

So did this happen yesterday or will it be today?



#7 OP DocM

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 19:48

That attempt was aborted when something (winds?) started the capsule rotating. Not too unusual with helo lifts. Expect another attempt when they get the rigging right. Not long.

#8 SarK0Y

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 03:23

in fact, if you have powered-landing -- capsule becomes heavy & 'chuting will be less efficient. in other words, Musk has made super expensive taxi for ISS + it's internally unreliable. :) by the way, will there be batteries or solar panels?



#9 OP DocM

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 05:57

For ISS taxi missions crew Dragon will use batteries (a much larger pack than cargo Dragon), as will the Boeing CST-100 and Sierra Nevada Dream Chaser. For longer missions, solar arrays.

We do not yet know what the new aeroshell will look like, nor the trunk. There have been statements of more and larger windows, an offset docking adapter to accomodate a forward pilots window, definitely retractable landing gear and fairings for the SuperDraco's.

There are others that I won't mention as they are either embargoed or unconfirmed.

#10 SarK0Y

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 22:42

 

For ISS taxi missions crew Dragon will use batteries (a much larger pack than cargo Dragon)

batteries are very concern for safety issue, such pack can Just not only catch a fire, there is possibility of explosion + pack makes weight penalty for landing & reduce internal space as well.



#11 geertd

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:09

 
For ISS taxi missions crew Dragon will use batteries (a much larger pack than cargo Dragon)

batteries are very concern for safety issue, such pack can Just not only catch a fire, there is possibility of explosion + pack makes weight penalty for landing & reduce internal space as well.

 

but that is thrue for every spacecraft and not only spacex dragons concerns

as doc said

For ISS taxi missions crew Dragon will use batteries (a much larger pack than cargo Dragon), as will the Boeing CST-100 and Sierra Nevada Dream Chaser. For longer missions, solar arrays. 

 

if you quote be sure to quote correctly



#12 SarK0Y

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:53

Geertd, why to use batteries, if solar panels are more safe? seems they want to reduce cost, but such reduction directly affects crew safety.



#13 OP DocM

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:02

Because batteries are used for storage on solar panel satellites and spacecraft too, covering times when they are in Earth's or any other bodies shadow. Same as a solar powered home or business needing power buffering at night. For short crewed flights like to the ISS solar isn't needed because the batteries can be recharged after docking. Larger batteries are also lighter and cheaper than $$ panels for such missions.

You should know this from the other site you were just booted off of. If mods want details I'll provide them & put 'em in contact.

Back from the troll's bridge to the really real world....

Third party, and oddly edited, video-pic mashup of todays parachute drop test. There should be a better one from SpaceX later.



#14 SarK0Y

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:23

 

Because batteries are used for storage on solar panel satellites and spacecraft too, covering times when they are in Earth's or any other bodies shadow. Same as a solar powered home or business needing power buffering at night. For short crewed flights like to the ISS solar isn't needed because the batteries can be recharged after docking. Larger batteries are also lighter and cheaper than $$ panels for such missions.

yes, DocM, it's cheaper. have i ever argued it??? :) but cheapness cannot be very priority for man-rated missions, if cost reduction pounds safety -- crew cannot jump out of capsule like users of tesla motors have liked to do ;)



#15 Brian M.

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 01:09

Thread Cleaned

Keep it on topic guys. Let's not resort to arguing.