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SpaceX Dragon 2 - testing & updates


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#46 malenfant

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 20:01

Colostomies and urostomies for everyone!

Joking aside, in a capsules confines its going to be a pretty squalid business. It is what it is.


#47 OP DocM

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 20:14

That's why for all but taxi missions a larger habitat and core truss including propulsion and taxi/lander docking nodes makes sense.

Artist-rendering-of-a-SpaceX-Dragon-on-a

#48 OP DocM

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 01:37

I find it interesting that recently Musk has gone from 1) dismissing lunar missions as uninteresting, to 2) saying they may do one to prove capability, to 3) emphasizing Dragon V2 is up to them.

Also, Robert T. Bigelow (commercial space stations) was at the Dragon V2 reveal and was gushing all over it. Of interest is that in Bigelow Aerospace's recent report to NASA on space commercialization was an advanced proposal for a moon base using their habitat tech.

This has spaked spculation that another deal is pending.

http://www.spacex.co...nned-spacecraft

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Additional upgrades include a SpaceX-designed and built ISS docking adapter, impact attenuating landing legs, and a more advanced version of the PICA-X (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator-X) heat shield for improved durability and performance. Dragon V2’s robust thermal protection system is capable of lunar missions, in addition to flights to and from Earth orbit.
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#49 malenfant

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 02:04

To the moon! First manned flight. EDIT - removed nonsense.

Actually a lunar flyby seems feasible.

#50 OP DocM

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 02:47

They could do an Apollo 8 style mission using Falcon Heavy. Dragon V2 is good for 7-10 days, so 6-7 days to go and return with a crew of 3-4.

Mount SuperDraco pods inside the trunk and add extra consumables and it may be able to stay a while.

#51 OP DocM

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 14:02

Posting here for documentation

Constrained thrust is what normal ops will be limited to, giving it an upside margin.

For comparison, the Apollo service modules SPS engine had a thrust of 91,000 N (20,500 lbf)

SuperDraco engine

Propellants: NTO/MMH (hypergolic)
Maximum thrust: 72,950.84 N (16,400 lbf)
Constrained thrust: 68,169 N (15,325 lbf)
Total vehicle thrust: 545,352 N (122,600 lbf)
Nozzle Exit Diameter: 20 cm (8 in)
Exhaust velocity: 2,300 m/sec (7,546 ft/s)
Mass Flow: 31 kg/sec

#52 OP DocM

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 05:31

As suspected, Chutes & Rocket landings first. Full propulsive will come later. NASA astronauts on the first crewed flight. That had been uncertain with contradictory statements from all directions.

http://www.spacepoli...nasa-astronauts

First Crewed Dragon Flight to Orbit Will Carry NASA Astronauts

SpaceX Founder and Chief Designer Elon Musk said in an interview this evening that the version of the Dragon spacecraft designed to take humans into space initially will be tested in an automated mode, but the first time it carries people, they will be NASA astronauts.

Dragon was the center of attention at a SpaceX event tonight in Washington, DC. The company unveiled this version of the spacecraft -- Dragon V2 -- on May 29 at an event in California. Now it is D.C.'s turn to see, touch, and sit in the vehicle. It will be on display through tomorrow (June 11) at the Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.

The capsule can accommodate seven people. Though it seems cozy by most standards, the interior is more spacious than Russia's Soyuz spacecraft, which is currently used to transport International Space Station (ISS) crews. When asked about the cost for a Dragon capsule, Musk replied it was about $60 million, and the total cost including launch is $140 million. SpaceX has said for many years that the price to NASA for a Dragon flight is $140 million. When asked if that is the price or the cost, Musk said it was the cost. He pointed out that if NASA uses all seven seats, that calculates out to $20 million a seat, much less than what Russia charges for a seat on Soyuz (in the $60-70 million range). However, NASA is not planning to use all seven seats. The ISS was designed to accommodate only seven crew members in total -- three launched by Russia and four by the United States. Presumably NASA would use any extra volume for cargo.

Musk confirmed that Dragon can remain in orbit for many months and hence could also serve as an ISS "lifeboat." Even when the space shuttle was flying, only Russia's Soyuz spacecraft could remain on orbit for six months at a time and perform the lifeboat function, remaining attached to ISS as an escape route for the crew in case of an emergency. Musk actually said this evening that Dragon can remain on orbit indefinitely whether or not it is attached to the ISS. Soyuz's lifetime is limited by how long its fuel can withstand the cold. Russia decided long ago that six months was as long as Soyuz should stay in orbit and be expected to safely return crews to Earth.

Some of the companies competing for the commercial crew contract have indicated that initial orbital crewed flights may involve one crewperson from the company and another from NASA. Musk said tonight that SpaceX has no astronauts and the first crewed flight would be with NASA astronauts only. When asked when the first crewed flight would take place, therefore, Musk said that was NASA's call since it is the customer. He said little training is needed to fly aboard Dragon since it is entirely automated, including docking.

SpaceX's current version of Dragon, used for cargo flights to the ISS, berths with ISS rather than docks. In berthing, Dragon flies close to the ISS and then the ISS crew uses Canadarm2 to grapple Dragon and maneuver it onto a docking port. The reverse is done at the end of the mission. Berthing therefore requires a crew to be aboard. That is not a desirable situation for crewed flights, which may be sent to the ISS when it is unoccupied or if a crew is evacuating the ISS. Therefore this version of Dragon must be able to dock and undock instead, where no human intervention from the ISS side of the docking ring is required.

Unlike the cargo version of Dragon, which splashes down in the ocean, the Dragon V2 will return to land using parachutes and propulsive landing systems. The goal is to land at Cape Canaveral, FL, but Musk said initial landings may be at White Sands, NM until they are certain of the spacecraft's landing precision.



#53 OP DocM

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 18:38

Pics from the DC Dragon V2 showing....

https://www.dropbox....mmCY9YMctRUhGFa

#54 OP DocM

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 19:27

About the above pics....

Note that it has external connectors other than the Dragon's Claw (trunk connector) in the front, 2 sets of 2. Probably pre-launch power connectors.

Also; this one is going to space, but first its SuperDraco pods will be borrowed for the pad abort tests vehicle. This one has the plumbing, wiring, avionics etc. but has the interior padding removed. The controls are pretty much set but may get a few tweaks.

It has 16 'regular' Draco thrusters, the 4 sets of 3 front & rear plus 4 more arranged laterally between the SuperDraco pods.

The windows are gold covered to filter the sunlight, Luke an astronauts face plate.

The dual knobs on the hatch are being interpreted as emergency pressure releases (partly based on an assumption of inflatable hatch seals.)

#55 OP DocM

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 17:28

If these go well we may well see an unmanned orbital test flight of Dragon V2 next summer, and a crewed flight in mid 2016..

http://www.spacenews...of-crew-capable

SpaceX Sets November, January Dates for Launch Abort Tests of Crew-capable Dragon

SAN DIEGO — Space Exploration Technologies Corp. will perform a pair of crucial launch abort tests beginning later this year for the crewed version of the Dragon space capsule central to the company’s bid to become NASA’s post-shuttle provider of astronaut transportation.

The Hawthorne, California-based company plans to conduct a pad abort test at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, in November, followed by an in-flight abort test from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in January, Garrett Reisman, SpaceX Dragon Rider program manager, said here Aug. 6 at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Space 2014 conference.

In the pad-abort test, Dragon will be mounted to a mocked-up SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and use its hydrazine-fueled SuperDraco thrusters to boost itself up and away from the pad, as it might need to do in the event of a major problem just before or during liftoff. The in-flight test will attempt to repeat the feat at altitude.

If the schedule, announced Aug. 6, holds, SpaceX will complete the abort tests about a year later than it planned when the company signed its Commercial Crew Integrated Capabilities agreement with NASA in 2012. The pact, now worth $440 million, was one of three NASA awarded under the program’s third major phase. As in all previous phases, NASA’s commercial crew partners are paid for completing negotiated milestones. The two abort tests are worth a combined $60 million to SpaceX.

The fourth and final commercial crew award is now expected in late August or early September. The fixed-price deal, known as Commercial Crew Transportation Capability, will cover development and safety certification of at least one commercially designed system. The deal will also cover the selected providers’ first round-trip astronaut flight to the international space station.
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dragon_alone_on_stage_2.jpg

#56 OP DocM

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 05:35

Dragon V2 Operations Critical Design Review scheduled for 2 weeks. Their detailed plans for Launch Complex 39A, the launch pad used for Apollo 11, will be part of what they share with NASA.

Its up to SpaceX to make them public as NASA is in the midst of a formal CCiCap blackout period. Same for the other competitors.